1. ArchDaily
  2. Infrastructures

Infrastructures: The Latest Architecture and News

Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge

Following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Maryland, construction group WeBuild, in collaboration with design office CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati and engineer Michel Virlogeux, has revealed an updated design for a replacement bridge. The new cable-stayed design aims to redefine the entrance to the Baltimore Harbor and offer an improved version of this symbol of the city.

Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge - Imagen 1 de 4Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge - Imagen 2 de 4Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge - Imagen 3 de 4Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge - Imagen 4 de 4Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge - More Images+ 1

MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal

MASSLAB has just won the competition for the new roof of Bragança's Water Treatment Plant in Portugal. Integrating public use of this infrastructure, which until now only serves a functional purpose, the project showcases adding value to existing infrastructure by rethinking them. Blending architecture, landscaping, and urban design to transform this structure into a vibrant public space, MASSLAB seeks to change the perception of water treatment facilities in urban settings. By reimagining the roof as a livable infrastructure, the project transforms the purely functional roof into an engaging and integral part of the urban fabric.

MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal - Imagen 1 de 4MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal - Imagen 2 de 4MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal - Imagen 3 de 4MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal - Imagen 4 de 4MASSLAB Transforms Bragança Water Treatment Plant into Dynamic Public Space in Portugal - More Images+ 3

Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US.

Social infrastructure encompasses the resources and services that allow the creation of communal bonds and social connections. Within the built environment, it manifests through public spaces like parks, libraries, and community centers alongside threshold spaces such as public transportation stops.

These public social spaces play a crucial role in strengthening communities and, in turn, their ability to respond to catastrophic climate-related events. They can provide physical shelter to the populations most vulnerable to these events and foster resilient networks of people who can more quickly recover. Given the escalating frequency of extreme weather events in the United States due to climate change and its social infrastructure inadequacies, examining public spaces as a critical tool for climate resilience becomes vital.

Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US. - Image 1 of 4Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US. - Image 2 of 4Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US. - Image 3 of 4Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US. - Image 4 of 4Public Spaces and Their Key Role in Building Climate Resilience in the US. - More Images

Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University?

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

I am by no means an expert on public-private partnerships. But for about 10 years, as the University of California Berkeley’s campus planner and then campus architect, I watched these developments play out in higher education—sometimes from a front-row seat, sometimes as a participant. During that time, this strategy, promoted with great enthusiasm and optimism, was touted as the answer to whatever problem arose. And yet the definition of a public-private partnership was slippery. The concept itself seemed to be all things for all people, depending on what was needed, who was recommending it, and what equivalents (if any) existed outside the university. The bandwagon continues to play today, making it ever more important to nail down the pros and cons of this development strategy, not only for colleges and universities, but for all public decision-making.

Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University? - Imagen 1 de 4Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University? - Imagen 2 de 4Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University? - Imagen 3 de 4Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University? - Imagen 4 de 4Are For-Profit Developments Consistent With the Values of a Public University? - More Images

The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study

CityMakers, The Global Community of Architects Who Learn from Exemplary Cities and Their Makers, is working with Archdaily to publish a series of articles about Barcelona, Medellin, and Rotterdam. The authors are the architects, urban planners, and/or strategists behind the projects that have transformed these three cities and are studied in the "Schools of Cities" and "Documentary Courses" made by CityMakers. On this occasion, Victor Restrepo, Coordinator of CityMakers in Medellin, presents his article "Medellin: A Case Study".

Medellín stands as an inspiring example for many cities worldwide. It is a city that transitioned from deep collective fear to hopeful enthusiasm for urban and social life characterized by quality and coexistence. The city's crisis has always been associated with violence and drug trafficking. However, this crisis is more structural and profound, it responds to many more factors, some of which are associated with the accelerated growth of its population, as in many Latin American cities.

The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study - Image 1 of 4The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study - Image 2 of 4The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study - Image 3 of 4The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study - Image 4 of 4The Urban Transformation of Medellín: A Case Study - More Images+ 7

The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation

CityMakers, The Global Community of Architects Who Learn from Exemplary Cities and Their Makers, is working with Archdaily to publish a series of articles about Barcelona, Medellin, and Rotterdam. The authors are the architects, urban planners, and/or strategists behind the projects that have transformed these three cities and are studied in the "Schools of Cities" and "Documentary Courses" made by CityMakers. On this occasion, Jaume Barnada, coordinator of the award-winning Climate Shelters project in Barcelona schools and speaker at the "Schools of Cities", presents his article "Barcelona, the public place as a synonym for the adaptation of the built city."

Cities are dense, built spaces in which pavements have been efficiently imposed on the natural soil. Cities like Barcelona have almost 75% of the land paved and waterproof. Without a doubt, it is an excess to reverse at a time of climate emergency, where we must reconnect with nature. Oriol Bohigas [1] told us that good urbanization had paved the squares of Mediterranean cities and that no one wanted to live in a mudhole. I'm sure he was right. Also, he taught us that the green and, consequently, the natural soil had to have dimension and especially an urban position. Squares are squares and parks are parks, and each space has a type of project. Today, concepts are too frequently confused when urbanizing public places and consequently, we find projects that blur the model.

The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation - Image 1 of 4The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation - Image 2 of 4The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation - Image 3 of 4The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation - Image 4 of 4The Barcelona Model: Public Space as a Synonym for Urban Adaptation - More Images+ 3

Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Design for Hydrogen Refueling Stations Across the Italian Marina

Zaha Hadid Architects have released images of their design for the world’s first hydrogen refueling infrastructure for recreational boating. Continuing ZHA’s experience in maritime designs, the stations are to be installed in 25 Italian marinas and ports. Launched by NatPower H, the stations will begin to be implemented in the summer of 2024, with plans to expand to over 100 locations throughout the Mediterranean Sea in the next six years.

Confronting the Racist Legacy of Urban Highways

Highways, in their inanimate state, cannot be racist. However, the forces that located them and the consequences of their placement are inextricably connected to race. Deborah Archer, a law professor and civil rights lawyer, captures the central concept: “Highways were built through and around Black communities to entrench racial inequality and protect white spaces and privilege.”

In the new book, Justice and the Interstates: The Racist Truth About Urban Highways, editors Ryan Reft, Amanda Phillips du Lucas, and Rebecca Retzlaff explore racial injustice and the interstate highway system. They collect essays that address the dislocation caused by interstates. The book came out of a series of articles in Metropole, a publication of the Urban History Association.

5 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show "Tale of Two Cities" with Dikshu Kukreja

Cities are the bedrock of civilization. For millennia, they have attracted people with the promise of superior standards of living — from better economic and educational opportunities to easier access to quality public infrastructure such as housing, healthcare, and public transport. Today, however, many cities around the world are finding it challenging to live up to this promise. With urban migration accelerating at a dizzying rate – the United Nations projects that over two-thirds of the world's population will live in cities or urban centers by 2050 – existing resources and services in cities are coming under increasing pressure, rendering them dysfunctional and leading to glaring inequities.

There is no singular way to define or assess liveability; every city has a unique set of characteristics, from its history, culture, geography, and demographics, to how it is governed and what urban issues plague it. Therefore, improving liveability requires concerted efforts from multiple stakeholders including people, governments, and experts, to identify critical problem areas and opportunities, and devise contextual solutions. The TV show Tale of Two Cities, where Indian architect and urbanist Dikshu C. Kukreja sits down with global leaders, brings out great insights into what some major cities in the world are doing to create more liveable environments for their inhabitants. Here we present five examples: from Bogotá, Kolkata, Hannover, Tirana, and Washington, D.C.

5 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show "Tale of Two Cities" with Dikshu Kukreja - Image 1 of 45 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show "Tale of Two Cities" with Dikshu Kukreja - Image 2 of 45 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show "Tale of Two Cities" with Dikshu Kukreja - Image 3 of 45 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show "Tale of Two Cities" with Dikshu Kukreja - Image 4 of 45 Ways to Create More Liveable Cities: Insights from TV Show Tale of Two Cities with Dikshu Kukreja - More Images+ 5

The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus

The Center for Arts and Innovation has just selected Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano to design its new creative campus. The campus is situated in the heart of downtown Boca Raton in Florida and aims to become a global hub for creative excellence. Ultimately, The Center is on a mission to transform Boca Raton into an internationally recognized destination for culture, arts, innovation, and technology.

The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus - Image 1 of 4The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus - Image 2 of 4The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus - Image 3 of 4The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus - Image 4 of 4The Center for Arts and Innovation Selects Renzo Piano to Design Boca Raton's Creative Campus - More Images+ 1

Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal

As the fastest-growing metropolitan city in the Midwest region, Columbus is situated amidst Central Ohio’s exciting blend of infrastructure and natural landscape. Columbus and its surroundings are currently undergoing a significant phase of cultural expansion and anticipate a population surpassing 3 million by 2050. In collaboration with Columbus-based Moody Nolan, Gensler has just revealed their design for the new terminal at John Glenn Columbus International Airport in Ohio, a facility to grow the city and support it in reaching these goals of expansion.

Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal - Image 1 of 4Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal - Image 2 of 4Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal - Image 3 of 4Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal - Image 4 of 4Gensler and Moody Nolan Reveal Ohio's New Airport Terminal - More Images

Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico

Architect Antoine Predock has unveiled his vision for the Albuquerque Rail Trail, a multi-use trail that will connect key destinations in the greater downtown area of New Mexico’s largest city. The project set out to combine the utility of pedestrian and bicycle pathways with the culture and history of the lands, encouraging healthy recreation, cultural expression and economic development. The Rail Trail project is of the Mayor’s Institute on City Design, Just City Mayoral Fellowship.

Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico - Image 1 of 4Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico - Image 2 of 4Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico - Image 3 of 4Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico - Image 4 of 4Antoine Predock Proposes a New Large City Bike Lane Project for Albuquerque, New Mexico - More Images+ 2

Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis?

The 2023 United Nations Conference of the Parties, more frequently referred to as COP28 is a joining of over 160 countries that intrinsically agree to combat harmful human impacts on the climate. The International Climate Summit takes place annually, bringing together heads of state, delegates, and representatives from various countries to negotiate actions and agreements related to climate mitigation. Last year, COP 27 was held between November 6 and November 18, 2022, in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. As the upcoming COP 28 in the United Arab Emirates is around the corner, it is worth looking at the conference’s impact and what to expect.

COP 28 will convene from November 30 to December 12 2023 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. In this year’s COP28, the program will be geared towards responding to the Global Stocktake and “closing the gaps to 2023.” The COP presidency has launched a consultation on thematic areas, encouraging international stakeholders to highlight the most pressing issues that should be prioritized in COP28. The themes for this year are Technology & Innovation, Inclusion, Frontline Communities, and Finance.

Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis? - Image 1 of 4Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis? - Image 2 of 4Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis? - Image 3 of 4Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis? - Image 4 of 4Looking Forward to COP28: Can Decisions About the Built Environment Save Us From the Climate Crisis? - More Images+ 3

Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India

India recently overtook its sub-continental neighbor, China, to become the most populous country in the world with a demography of over 1.4286 billion people. As data from the United Nations also estimates an annual population growth rate of 0.7%, the country’s built environment is set to interact with a new discourse of demography and present its own perspective on how to build for billions. It is set to engage with new challenges of infrastructure, transportation, and adequate housing, which on the surface will force cities to constantly expand as a response to these dynamic needs. However, a critical look at the population distribution within the country reveals that the majority of Indians still live in rural areas as it caters to 65% of the population despite increasing rural-urban migration. This suggests a nudge in a different direction. One where the design and development of the rural areas take precedence over the cities. One that explores architecture in rural areas, its relationship with the cities, and its future as a primary framework to house the exploding population.

Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India - Image 1 of 4Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India - Image 2 of 4Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India - Image 4 of 4Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India - Image 5 of 4Building for a Growing Population: Shifting the Focus to Rural India - More Images+ 6