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OPEN Architecture's Chapel of Sound Reimagines the Concert Hall

04:30 - 19 February, 2019
OPEN Architecture's Chapel of Sound Reimagines the Concert Hall, Cross section
Cross section

Nestled in a valley north of Beijing, a building will soon be completed that may appear to have always been there, or to have emerged from and grown out of the surrounding stony landscape. OPEN Architecture’ Chapel of Sound in Chengde, China was recently recognized in the 66th annual Progressive Architecture (P/A) Awards, chosen as one of ten projects to receive the commendation. The P/A Awards focus on innovative, ongoing work that promotes new ways of thinking about architecture. The Chapel of Sound was noted for its creation of a new, progressive type of environment and its reimagining of an established typology.

Outdoor stage Great wall viewing platform Outdoor concert Exterior view + 14

The Beauty in the Imperfections of Ruins in Architecture

04:00 - 19 February, 2019
The Beauty in the Imperfections of Ruins in Architecture, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

© Erica Overmeer © Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill © Philip Vile © Erich Spahn + 17

If walls could speak, they would have the most stories to tell - stories of antiquity, war, scandal, and reconciliation. Approaches to preservation are as varied as the architects behind them, but many take on the challenge with flair and restraint in equal measure. It is common to see preservation that combines ancient structure with contemporary features, creating beautiful combinations of old and new.

Take a look at some architectures from our projects database that highlight the beauty in the imperfections of ruins and great combinations of used and new materials.

This collection is one of many interesting content groupings made by our registered users. Remember you can save and manage what inspires you on My ArchDaily. Create your account here.

LAGI 2019: Design the Future of Renewable Energy

02:00 - 19 February, 2019
LAGI 2019: Design the Future of Renewable Energy, Light Up, by NH Architecture, Ark Resources, John Bahoric Design, and RMIT architecture students is the winner of the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Melbourne, and generates 2,220 MWh of clean energy.
Light Up, by NH Architecture, Ark Resources, John Bahoric Design, and RMIT architecture students is the winner of the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Melbourne, and generates 2,220 MWh of clean energy.

The LAGI 2019 competition offers designers and creatives the opportunity to re-imagine energy infrastructure and demonstrate the beauty of a 100% renewable world.

SquareOne Proposes Repurposing a Water Tower as Public Spas/Student Housing

13:00 - 18 February, 2019
SquareOne Proposes Repurposing a Water Tower as Public Spas/Student Housing, Public spa. Image Courtesy of SquareOne
Public spa. Image Courtesy of SquareOne

Raise your hand if you’ve ever wanted to go swimming inside a water tower. In reality, it would probably be dark and creepy and not as cool as it sounds, but that’s not the case with Danish firm SquareOne’s design, where the top of an abandoned water tower becomes a public swimming pool and spa. Utilizing the existing structural system of the tower, SquareOne is also proposing adding 40+ student housing units suspended around the tower. This dual-purpose scheme addresses Copenhagen’s desperate housing shortage while also giving new life to an old building.

 

Interior beam structure of Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Existing Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Proposed Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Courtesy of SquareOne + 10

The Possibilities of Pigmented Concrete: 18 Buildings Infused With Color

04:00 - 18 February, 2019
The Possibilities of Pigmented Concrete: 18 Buildings Infused With Color, Center for Interpretation of The Battle of Atoleiros / Gonçalo Byrne Arquitectos + Oficina Ideias em Linha. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Center for Interpretation of The Battle of Atoleiros / Gonçalo Byrne Arquitectos + Oficina Ideias em Linha. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

When we think of concrete, the color gray generally comes to mind. The traditional mixture of concrete, which comprises cement, gravel, sand, and water may vary in color depending on elements and admixtures but naturally varies from light to dark gray. However, compounds that add pigment to the mixture are becoming increasingly prevalent and popular,  as they infuse the concrete with hues more stable than paint. These shades result from the addition of oxides:  yellow, red and their derivations (eg. brown) are obtained with the addition of iron oxide; chromium and cobalt oxide create the greens and blues, respectively. For black concrete, it is common to use black iron oxide and carbon oxide combined with pozzolanic cement.

Centro Cultural Comunitário Teotitlán del Valle / PRODUCTORA. Image © Luis Gallardo - LGM Studio Museu Cais do Sertão / Brasil Arquitetura. Image © Nelson Kon Residência Montagnola / Attilio Panzeri & Partners. Image © Giorgio Marafioti Galería Solar S. Roque / Manuel Maia Gomes. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG + 19

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"Architecture from Someone's Imagination is not Enough": Interview with Junya Ishigami

06:00 - 17 February, 2019
Junya Ishigami's works at the 2008 Venice Biennale. Image © junya.ishigami+associates
Junya Ishigami's works at the 2008 Venice Biennale. Image © junya.ishigami+associates

I think that the conversation with Junya Ishigami at his experimental (and very international) studio in Tokyo was one of the most memorable experiences of my recent trip to Japan. Junya's visions for not just of his own architecture but for the profession were wholeheartedly inspiring. He thinks that architecture today is “not free enough.” He wants to diversify it, liberate it from so many architects’ insistence on following particular building types and, in general, our narrow expectations. He wants his architecture to be soft and loose and finds inspiration in such improbable metaphors as clouds or the surface of water. “We need to introduce more varieties of architecture to better address peoples’ dreams…I want to expand architecture into the future by creating new comfortabilities,” says Ishigami, whose two recent manifesto-like exhibitions in Paris questioned the very nature and purpose of architecture. He is a visionary and essential voice in what is perhaps the most unsettled of all professions.

Cartier Foundation Exhibition / Junya Ishigami. Image © junya.ishigami+associates Cartier Foundation Exhibition / Junya Ishigami. Image © junya.ishigami+associates Junya Ishigami's works at the 2008 Venice Biennale. Image © junya.ishigami+associates Kanagawa Institute of Technology (KAIT) / Junya Ishigami. Image © Giovanni Emilio Galanello + 33

Inspire Imagination and Play With Architecture Toys to Assemble

11:00 - 16 February, 2019
Inspire Imagination and Play With Architecture Toys to Assemble, Cortesia de Bubud
Cortesia de Bubud

Most architects who are parents have thought, at some point, about designing and building toys for their children. Paula Zasnicoff, a partner at Arquitetos Associados, along with designer Andrea Gomes, decided to go for it and created the Bubud brand.

Do You Think About How Your Architecture Project Will Age? We Want to Hear from You!

10:00 - 16 February, 2019
Do You Think About How Your Architecture Project Will Age? We Want to Hear from You!, Historical photo: Courtesy of Retrieve the Ariston, Flickr user: ladyandrux. ImageArador Ariston / Marcel Breuer
Historical photo: Courtesy of Retrieve the Ariston, Flickr user: ladyandrux. ImageArador Ariston / Marcel Breuer

When the work finally comes to an end, the cleaning is done and preparations for the opening are underway, everything looks perfect. Coatings are all in their proper place, shining and with the intended color; wood surfaces are as yet unmarked and there is even a feeling of freshness and new life. Photographs mean that, for many, this vision of perfection is all that will ever be seen. 

But this perfection can be superficial. Failing to consider the damaging power of time during design and specification stages means can hasten the appearance of inevitable imperfections. Small fissures, stains, and scuffs among many other problems (that we have all dealt with at some point) begin to appear. The beautiful wood frame, so lovingly chosen, starts to look greyish. The paint fades where the sun hits the strongest. Boards begin to warp and fall  from the facade.

The Unfamiliar History of an Expressionist, Crafty Bauhaus

08:00 - 16 February, 2019
The Unfamiliar History of an Expressionist, Crafty Bauhaus, The African Chair, designed in 1921 by Gunta Stölzl and Marcel Breuer. Image Courtesy of Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Hartwig Klappert/© 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
The African Chair, designed in 1921 by Gunta Stölzl and Marcel Breuer. Image Courtesy of Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Hartwig Klappert/© 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Every famed design movement has an interesting story of how it managed to influence architecture and design through the years. Despite their impact, not all movements began with the same principles they managed to ultimately lead with, and Bauhaus is no exception. The clean-cut modernist archetype, which has pioneered modern architecture for a century now, was once an experimental design institution of expressionism, unbound creativity, and handcraft, bridging the styles of Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts with Modernist designs.

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17 Bauhaus Instagram Feeds to Follow

06:00 - 16 February, 2019
17 Bauhaus Instagram Feeds to Follow , Image via Flickr user Frank Schmidtke
Image via Flickr user Frank Schmidtke

Celebrate Bauhaus 100 through the world's number one visual storytelling platform, Instagram. An essential tool for designers, Instagram is a constantly growing digital database of market sharing and stimulation. Social media has changed not only how we gather precedents and market our designs, but also our designs themselves. "Instagram Culture" drives designers to create more shareable moments. As we continue to seek these dynamic encounters, let us not forget our forefathers of user experience design and the Bauhaus school.

SCI-Arc Studio Connects Issues of Disciplinary Relevance with Advanced Technological Developments.

Sponsored Article
SCI-Arc Studio Connects Issues of Disciplinary Relevance with Advanced Technological Developments.

For its second year as part of the EDGE Center for Advanced Studies, the MS in Architectural Technologies program at SCI-Arc continued connecting issues of disciplinary relevance with the most advanced technological developments reshaping society and culture at large.

Taught by Program Coordinator Marcelo Spina and Casey Rehm, the program’s final degree studio “The Future of Experience: Speculations on New Cultural Centers” explored how artificial intelligence (AI) and its various forms of automation allow us to visualize, learn from, and reconfigure the world.

ArchDaily Topics - February: Representation in Architecture

07:30 - 14 February, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - February: Representation in Architecture

Starting this month, ArchDaily will introduce monthly themes. Our editors and curators will align their efforts to go deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse, presenting new articles, projects, collaborations, and submissions by our readers. This month we will begin with Architectural Representation.

What started as a ground cut to represent buildings as a 2D maze or the flat representation of styles on an elevation, later evolved into the axonometric representations of battlefields and fortresses for military use, and since then into a diverse variety of views, formats and techniques that go beyond the mere representation of a volume for its construction.

13 Houses with Pitched Roofs and their Sections

07:00 - 14 February, 2019
13 Houses with Pitched Roofs and their Sections, Section
Section

The roof is one of the most essential structural elements of nearly every construction. It is the element that allows a delineated space to transform into one that feels protected. Strongly related to the climatic conditions of the context, the roof's variations in aesthetic and structural design have allowed architects to indulge their stylistic preoccupations to convert roofs not only into elements of closure and climate protection but into a character-giving feature that lends identity and flair – especially when the roof becomes a wall.

Following this opportunity, we want to highlight great examples of roofs that also become walls: 13 houses in which the roof completes the façade, delineating not only the interior in its vertical sense but also in the horizontal one.

This collection is one of many interesting content groupings made by our registered users. Remember you can save and manage what inspires you on My ArchDaily. Create your account here.

© Kai Nakamura © Kai Nakamura © Masato Kawano © Toshiyuki Yano + 29

The Best Drawing Tutorials for Architects on YouTube

05:00 - 14 February, 2019
The Best Drawing Tutorials for Architects on YouTube, Screenshot do vídeo "Sketch like an Architect (Techniques + Tips from a Real Project)", de 30X40 Design Workshop
Screenshot do vídeo "Sketch like an Architect (Techniques + Tips from a Real Project)", de 30X40 Design Workshop

The slightly trembling linework, the distinctive crossed corners, the parallel hatching, and the uppercase letters: it is undeniable that architects have developed a style of drawing over time. And though free-hand perspectives are no longer the only (or even primary) form of representation for architectural projects, they still have enormous importance during the design process. They are a design tool rather than a form of representation. 

A line that is too thick, an ill-chosen color, a disproportionate scale figure – these are all elements that can draw attention away from the things we actually want to show. Even for an unpretentious and quick sketch, some rules are very important. Some tips help turn an ordinary sketch into something you take pride in and want to show to others. Taking advantage of the huge collection of youtube videos, we have selected some content creators who dedicate themselves to sharing their expertise with the masses. 

Trends in Architectural Visualization 2019: Storytelling with New Media

Sponsored Article
Trends in Architectural Visualization 2019: Storytelling with New Media, Courtesy of Unreal
Courtesy of Unreal

Every year we see new tools and techniques for better, faster architectural visualization. The last few years have been a particularly exciting time because of advances in real-time rendering applications. When coupled with supporting technology like virtual reality headsets, projectors, and graphics cards, real-time photoreal rendering is putting stunning, dynamic visualization media within reach—mixed and augmented reality worlds, interactive configurators, game-like presentations—so architects and designers can truly tell their stories.

Months Before Opening Day, the Promised - and Sold - High-Tech Utopia of Hudson Yards is Still Just a Dream

07:00 - 13 February, 2019
Months Before Opening Day, the Promised - and Sold - High-Tech Utopia of Hudson Yards is Still Just a Dream, The Hudson Yards Development. Image © Mark Wickens
The Hudson Yards Development. Image © Mark Wickens

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Hudson Yards Promised a High-Tech Neighborhood — It was a Greater Challenge Than Expected."

There’s something striking about the command center of America’s largest private real estate development, Hudson Yards, in that it’s actually pretty boring. The room—technically known as the Energy Control Center, or ECC for short—contains two long desks crammed with desktop computers, a few TV monitors plastered to the wall, and a corkboard lined with employee badges. The ceiling is paneled; the lighting, fluorescent. However, New York’s Hudson Yards was once billed as the country’s first “quantified community”: A network of sensors would collect data on air quality, noise levels, temperature, and pedestrian traffic. This would create a feedback loop for the developers, helping them monitor and improve quality of life. So where is the NASA-like mission control? Data collection and advanced infrastructure will still drive parts of Hudson Yards’ operations, but not (yet) as first advertised.

The Brutal Majesty of Bratislava's Slovak Radio Tower, Through the Lens of Alexandra Timpau

04:00 - 13 February, 2019
© Alexandra Timpau, Alex Shoots Buildings
© Alexandra Timpau, Alex Shoots Buildings

Opening in the late 1980s after more than ten years of construction, the Slovak Radio Tower is an unmissable feature in the landscape of Bratislava. The building, an inverted pyramid of steel frame construction, was designed by Štefan Svetko, Štefan Ďurkovič, and Barnabáš Kissling during the height of socialist realism.

© Alexandra Timpau, Alex Shoots Buildings © Alexandra Timpau, Alex Shoots Buildings © Alexandra Timpau, Alex Shoots Buildings The Brutal Majesty of Bratislava's Slovak Radio Tower, Through the Lens of Alexandra Timpau + 19

7 International Examples of How the Bauhaus Lived On After 1933

07:00 - 12 February, 2019
7 International Examples of How the Bauhaus Lived On After 1933

After the dissolution of the Bauhaus due to Nazi political pressure in April 1933, the ideas, teachings, and philosophies of the school were flung across the world as former students and faculty dispersed in the face of impending war. Of the numerous creative talents associated with the Bauhaus, many went on to notable careers elsewhere. Some made a living as artists or practitioners, others either continued or began careers as teachers themselves - and many did both throughout the course of their lives.

Main building of the former Black Mountain College. Image via Wikimedia under public domain Gropius House. Imagevia Picryl under public domain Ulm School of Design building by Max Bill . Image © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:HfGUlmbuilding.jpg'>Flickr user alphanumeric</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Barn at Pond Farm. Image © <a href=‘https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pond_Farm_Barn_Exterior.JPG'>Wikimedia user MikeVdP</a> licensed under <a href=‘https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 11

Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know

05:00 - 12 February, 2019
Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know, © Leana Cagnotto
© Leana Cagnotto

In many parts of the world, more women have architectural degrees than men. However, this fact hasn’t translated past university into the working world as women continue to be underrepresented across nearly all levels of practice.

The conversation regarding women in architecture gained tremendous traction back in 2013 with the petition for Denise Scott Brown to be recognized as the 1991 Pritzker Prize winner, alongside her husband and the consequent rejection of that request by Pritzker. The Architectural Review and Architect's Journal have, since 2015, jointly presented awards to the exceptional female practitioners as part of their Women in Architecture Awards program. The swelling of these movements have helped to promote not only the role but also the recognition of women in architecture.

What Urbanism Needs to Learn from Dubai

07:00 - 11 February, 2019
What Urbanism Needs to Learn from Dubai , Photo by Flickr user Lars Plougmann
Photo by Flickr user Lars Plougmann

In the past three decades, Dubai has grown from a dusty desert town to a strategic hub for international business and tourism. As a result, several cities in the developing world have been competing to outdo one another in the race to replicate this development model—an urbanism largely built around the automobile, luxury villas, gleaming skyscrapers, massive shopping malls, and ambitious “smart” cities, designed and built from scratch. Across Africa, these new developments go by different names: Eko Atlantic City Nigeria, Vision City in Rwanda, Ebene Cyber City in Mauritius; Konza Technology City in Kenya; Safari City in Tanzania; Le Cite du Fleuve in DR Congo, and several others. All are mimicries of Dubai.

Basic Principles of Acoustics: Why Architects Shouldn’t Leave It All To Consultants

04:00 - 11 February, 2019
Basic Principles of Acoustics: Why Architects Shouldn’t Leave It All To Consultants, © ELEMENT
© ELEMENT

More than half the world’s population lives in dense urban areas. Uncomfortably loud restaurants, stores, hotels, or offices are enough to keep patrons away. When planning a meeting or even a night out with friends, we are conscious of selecting a location where we can focus and hear one another. The noisier our world gets, the more difficulty we have focusing on the sounds we actually want to hear.

Since the beginning of time, our ears have warned us of approaching danger. While their function remains the same, the dangers of today are different than they were in the past. Unwanted sounds can have serious health effects such as: hearing loss, cardiovascular disease high blood pressure, headaches, hormonal changes, psychosomatic illnesses, sleep disorders, reduction in physical and mental performance, stress reactions, aggression, constant feelings of displeasure and reduction in general well-being. With this laundry list of side effects, it would be foolish to leave the acoustic comfort of our spaces up to consultants alone. When we take acoustic comfort into our own hands, the end result can be quite extraordinary.

© Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elise Géhin © Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elise Géhin © Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elise Géhin © Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elise Géhin + 24

The Week in Architecture: the Long-Awaited Rise of Reuse and the Next Generation of Architects

08:00 - 10 February, 2019
© Jaime Navarro. Cineteca Nacional / Rojkind Arquitectos
© Jaime Navarro. Cineteca Nacional / Rojkind Arquitectos

This past Monday brought with it not just a new week, but the start of the lunar new year. The start of the lunar new year brings with it another chance to review what's past and start afresh - a welcome opportunity for those of us already suffering a bit of new year blues. 

Looking back to move forward seemed to be a bit of a theme this week, with the announcement of a number of memorials and renovations on historic sites. While the spate of new projects this week is certainly a coincidence, the recent proliferation of reuse and memorial projects, in general, shouldn't come as a surprise. As the age of the icon-producing starchitect stutters to a close, the long-gestating movements in reuse and preservation will likely come to the fore as a major movement in contemporary architecture. While major works such as the LocHal Library and the Battersea Arts Centre are banner examples, this is a movement that will celebrate the small-scale and local. 

Boston Startup Spaceus Brings Pop-Up Energy to Vacant Storefronts

07:00 - 9 February, 2019
Boston Startup Spaceus Brings Pop-Up Energy to Vacant Storefronts, Harvard Square storefront. Photo by Carlen Deskin.. Image © Spaceus
Harvard Square storefront. Photo by Carlen Deskin.. Image © Spaceus

As retail moves evermore online, vacant storefronts have become ubiquitous sights in American cities and towns. Often located in formerly prime downtown real estate, the darkened windows have a knock-on effect, sapping urban vibrancy and sometimes falling into disrepair. Discourse surrounding the predicament of dead malls and traditional retail space is ongoing, but a one-size fits-all solution clearly isn't the answer here.

Calligraphy workshop at 11 First Street. Photo by Mustafa Hameed.. Image © Spaceus Storefront performance. Photo by Ellen Shakespear.. Image © Spaceus Harvard Square storefront workspace. Photo by Stephanie Lee.. Image © Spaceus Zine-making marathon at Harvard Square storefront. Photo by Carlen Deskin.. Image © Spaceus + 10

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Awarded 2019 Royal Academy Architecture Prize

14:15 - 8 February, 2019
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Awarded 2019 Royal Academy Architecture Prize, Liz Diller and Ricardo Scofidio; image via the Architects' Journal
Liz Diller and Ricardo Scofidio; image via the Architects' Journal

Diller Scofidio + Renfro has been announced the winner of the 2019 Royal Academy Architecture Prize, an award given annually by the British arts body to recognize firms or individuals who have been "instrumental in shaping the discussion, collection, or production of architecture in the broadest sense."

The Shed / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Hufton + Crow. ImageThe Broad / Diller Scofidio + renfro © Beat Widmer, Courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro. . ImageBlur / Diller Scofidio + Renfro Iwan Baan. ImageThe Highline / James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro + 10

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