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A Complementary Architectural Dialogue of Past and Present in the Refurbishment of Hotel Fouquet Barrière

07:00 - 26 April, 2019
A Complementary Architectural Dialogue of Past and Present in the Refurbishment of Hotel Fouquet Barrière, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Although ancient buildings carry compelling architectural presence, demolition or radical change is often their fate. While some architects prefer to introduce thoroughly new structures, others choose to honor the works of historic architects, who built the basis and foundations of structures that helped shape up cities today.

For the refurbishment of ParisHotel Fouquet Barrière, located one block facing Avenue des Champs Elysées, Edouard François was selected to renovate the entire property, including offices, spa services, façade, and courtyards. François’ design strategy was rather unambiguous, using only two keywords as reference: “COPY-EDIT”; a reinterpretation of the “old” through contemporary technologies and modified material.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 19

Spotlight: Peter Zumthor

06:30 - 26 April, 2019
The Therme Vals. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG
The Therme Vals. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Known for his sensuous materiality and attention to place, 2009 Pritzker Laureate Peter Zumthor (born April 26, 1943) is one the most revered architects of the 21st century. Shooting to fame on the back of The Therme Vals and Kunsthaus Bregenz, completed just a year apart in 1996 and 1997, his work privileges the experiential qualities of individual buildings over the technological, cultural and theoretical focus often favored by his contemporaries.

Bruder Klaus Field Chapel. Image © Samuel Ludwig Steilneset Memorial. Image © Andrew Meredith Saint Benedict Chapel. Image © Felipe Camus Kunsthaus Bregenz. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/heyitschili/4163419615'>Flickr user heyitschili</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> + 16

Spotlight: Gert Wingårdh

04:00 - 26 April, 2019
Spotlight: Gert Wingårdh, Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström
Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström

One of Sweden’s most esteemed living architects, Gert Wingårdh (born 26 April 1951) brought Swedish architecture out of the tradition of the International Style and into contemporary times with his playful design spirit and love of eye-catching materials. With his use of bright colors and geometric motifs, his recent buildings have been described as "Maximalist" or "Modern Baroque."

Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Kuggen. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Facts Emporia. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Quality Hotel Friends / Karolina Keyzer + Wingårdhs. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström + 15

What is Co-Living?

04:30 - 25 April, 2019
What is Co-Living?, Cortesia de WeWork
Cortesia de WeWork

Many of us have already lived, are living, or will live in a shared student house - a good mix of cheap housing and intense socializing with friends and school mates. For a reasonable price, it is possible to have a single private room and share common spaces. In fact, not only university students are living this way nowadays. The concept of co-living is becoming more and more an attractive and effective solution.

Watch Daniel Libeskind's Advice for Young Architects

08:30 - 24 April, 2019

Louisiana Channel has released a video interview conducted with world-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, where he advises young architects to follow their dreams, take risks, and expose themselves to the possibilities of short term sacrifice for long term gain. Reflecting on the pace of change, Libeskind says “the world is always changing, but not very slowly. It changes just suddenly. It doesn’t change by evolution, it changes suddenly. If a young architect realizes this, it is a big help. It took me a while to realize that.”

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Top Tips for BIM Beginners

06:30 - 24 April, 2019
Top Tips for BIM Beginners, Cortesía de Academia BIM
Cortesía de Academia BIM

When you start to consider implementing the BIM (Building Information Modeling) methodology, whether as an independent professional or as a construction firm, it's necessary to take into account three key aspects: the technology, the process, and the people who bring it all together. In this article, we will address the key points in every one of these three aspects in order to give you insight into how to best start using BIM.

5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit

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5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit, Courtesy of Workshop Architects, Cooper Carry, OLIN, and Gilbane
Courtesy of Workshop Architects, Cooper Carry, OLIN, and Gilbane

Today in the United States, buildings account for nearly 40% of carbon emissions (EESI) and 78% of electricity usage. The most sustainability-focused firms run energy simulations for less than 50% of their projects (10% for a typical firm) and only doing so late in the process when design changes are limited and insufficient to combat red flags found in the performance report (AIA 2030 report). We can make building performance widespread once we help the entire community discuss the subject in terms of investment and return. Especially during a project pursuit, since having the buy in from the whole team helps ensure the key project metrics are met. Owners are seeking out teams who are using actual metrics and data driven processes that affect their bottom line. This new approach to practice is what makes the younger teams’ standout and will benefit both the climate and the bottom-line. Here are 5 ways to talk about building performance in your project pursuits: 

We Are Looking Back! / Yung Ho Chang's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennial 2019

05:20 - 23 April, 2019
Installation Looking for Malevich. Image © FCJZ
Installation Looking for Malevich. Image © FCJZ

Archdaily is working with the "Eyes of the City" curatorial team, to publish a series of articles by international architects, designers, writers and thinkers who will discuss the ways in which new technologies - and Artificial Intelligence in particular - might impact architecture and urban life. After the publication of the curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, Politecnico di Torino and SCUT, we are hosting a text by Chinese architect Yung Ho Chang, curator of the first edition of Shenzhen Biennale in 2005. The open call for proposals for the “Eyes of the City” will run from April 1st to May 31st: www.eyesofthecity.net

The American University in Dubai Celebrates the Work of Students at the Yearly Architecture Senior Showcase

Sponsored Article

The Bachelor of Architecture (B. ARCH) at the American University in Dubai was inaugurated in the fall of 2009 and much like Dubai, is young, dynamic, and has achieved considerable milestones over a short period of which NAAB accreditation is at the top. The architecture department along with the Interior Design and the Visual communication departments make up the School of Architecture, Art, and Design (SAAD), which is the only school outside of the USA to have obtained the three primary accreditations (NAAB, CIDA, and NASAD). These accreditations reflect high education standards and quality assurance of SAAD’s programs.

How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change

09:00 - 22 April, 2019
How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change, © SCAPE/City of Boston
© SCAPE/City of Boston

As the world recognizes Earth Day 2019, the public discourse is increasingly dominated by citizen action across the world manifesting a widespread fear and frustration at a perceived lack of action by governments and officials to confront the issue forthrightly. From the Extinction Rebellion protests that have gripped London, to school student strikes across 125 countries, global cities are increasingly finding themselves on the front line of a battle to limit the effects of global warming.

“We Want to Enjoy the Work, Enjoy the Fight”: In Conversation with Qing Fei and Frank Fu of Renhe Architecture

10:00 - 21 April, 2019
“We Want to Enjoy the Work, Enjoy the Fight”: In Conversation with Qing Fei and Frank Fu of Renhe Architecture, Quake Projects, Minle Houses, Mianzh. Image © Renhe Architecture
Quake Projects, Minle Houses, Mianzh. Image © Renhe Architecture

Last year I was invited to teach design studio for the first time by Tsinghua University in Beijing, home to the top architecture school in China and one of the strongest in the world, according to the latest international ratings. There, I met husband-and-wife teaching practitioners Qing Fei and Frank Fu. As soon as I witnessed their unorthodox way of teaching by challenging students with rigorous questioning, I wanted to interview them. Their innovative approach did not fit my impression of how architecture is tackled in China. Fei and Fu are Tsinghua graduates; they moved to America in the late 1980s where they studied, worked, and researched both art and architecture for almost two decades. They opened their experimental practice after coming back to Beijing in 2005. Since then they produced urban masterplans, design guidelines for public spaces in Beijing’s 798 Art Zone, and exhibited their work in galleries. We met before their class where they oversaw students’ designs for a new architecture school in place of the current one, articulating what works, what doesn’t, and how to make it a more exciting place to explore architectural possibilities. We discussed their teaching, the impossibility of solving a problem without questioning it first, why they see every one of their projects as a fight, and the importance of fun. They said, “Architecture is a game and we want to play it seriously.”

Easter Egg Hunt: Architecture Edition

06:30 - 21 April, 2019
Easter Egg Hunt: Architecture Edition , © Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond

Now that it's time for the Easter Holidays, kids (and young-at-heart adults) will be busy searching for colorful eggs hidden here and there. As for you architecture lovers, illustrator Chanel Dehond took egg hunts to the next level and found a way to make the activity a bit more relatable.

Take a look at Dehond's eggceptional collection of illustrations, inspired by some of your favorite structures from all over the world.

© Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond + 22

Capturing the Beauty of Singapore’s Diverse Architecture

04:00 - 21 April, 2019

If you come to think of it, the urban development of the world's largest cities is like playing a game of Tetris; No matter how condensed or crowded, for architects, there is always room for more. However, this act of 'structural stacking' often creates unique architectural compositions.

As a follow-up to his first photo-series, Singaporean photographer and visual artist Kevin Siyuan put together 'Corridors of Diversity', a short montage of communal corridors and HDB (Housing and Development Board) block facades, featuring the dynamic designs and forms of Singapore's densely built environment.

"We Designed an Exhibition that Presents the Bauhaus in all its Dazzling Diversity": Barbara Holzer Explains her Design for the New Bauhaus Museum

10:00 - 20 April, 2019
"We Designed an Exhibition that Presents the Bauhaus in all its Dazzling Diversity": Barbara Holzer Explains her Design for the New Bauhaus Museum, Tomás Saraceno "Sundial for Spatial Echoes“. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture
Tomás Saraceno "Sundial for Spatial Echoes“. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture

On the weekend of the 5th-7th of April, the city of Weimar celebrated the opening of the recently-completed Bauhaus Museum, along with its permanent exhibition of the 100-year history of Bauhaus.

Located near the Neue Museum, the concrete structure was designed by German architect Prof. Heike Hanada. The architect followed the school’s minimalist approach, and developed a 5-storey cubic building, with a clearly defined geometric form and horizontal grooves all around the facade. The museum’s permanent exhibition, which was designed and curated by Barbara Holzer of Holzer Kobler Architekturen, houses the world’s oldest Bauhaus collection, bringing forth debates on contemporary design and showcasing the school’s most notable inventions.

In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily, Holzer explains the creative process of designing the exhibition space, and some of the challenges she faced while exhibiting Bauhaus' distinguished works.

Exhibition Space . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Stage . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Theodor Bogler, Stock Canc, 1923. Image © Vereinigung der Benediktiner to Maria Laach e.V. Mies van der Rohe. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture + 31

A Close Look at UNStudio’s Dynamic Lines Shaping a New District in Hangzhou in a Video by #donotsettle

08:00 - 20 April, 2019

© #donotsettle © #donotsettle © #donotsettle © #donotsettle + 9

#donotsettle is a project about Architecture and Experience. Watch 100+ more videos related to Architecture on their YouTube Channel, or see what we are up to on Instagram and Facebook.

10 Years in the Making

When Raffles City was completed in the second half of 2017, it undoubtedly marked an important moment for UNStudio. This large-scale project (almost 400 000 sqm) formed the first presence of UNStudio in the ‘Middle Kingdom’. And they entered the large market with a bang. The 2 towers rise to 250 meters in height, gently weave, twist and turn to form a dynamic ensemble while incorporating a large-scale mall at its base. The project is located in Hangzhou, a city about 150 km from China’s financial center Shanghai. While Hangzhou isn’t that well known outside China, the city is one of the most prosperous on the mainland. Nowadays perhaps more famous by being the home of technology juggernaut Alibaba than the more idyllic west lake, Hangzhou is rapidly developing with new areas, districts and financial centers. Raffles City is a key point in one of those new districts. Located along the river, Qianjiang New Area is aiming high. Skyscraper after skyscraper rising out of the ground, the one bolder than the other. But no doubt that UNStudio’s dynamic lines shape the new face of Hangzhou.

Design - The Iconic Lesson Proffered by Vilanova Artigas

06:00 - 20 April, 2019
Design - The Iconic Lesson Proffered by Vilanova Artigas, Master Plan for Brasília - 1956. Image © © Acervo Vilanova Artigas
Master Plan for Brasília - 1956. Image © © Acervo Vilanova Artigas

On March 1, 1967, João Batista Vilanova Artigas, Brazilian modernist architect, proffered at the College of Architecture and Urbanism of Sao Paulo University an inaugural lesson that marks his return to the university after the exile imposed by the Brazilian military coup. This lesson became one of the most influential concept to the next generation of Brazilian architects and we share here the entire speech.

Architecture and Sea: Outstanding Projects on the Beaches of Mexico

04:00 - 20 April, 2019

One of the most important factors when designing is the specific climate of the site, this can represent a difficulty when dealing with extreme climates and it is necessary to use insulating materials that adapt to changing conditions. However, when talking about Mexico and its privileged climate, this becomes an advantage for architects, allowing the creation of microclimates and spaces that fade into the transition of what is the inside and the outside.

Detailed Globe Drawings of Cities Around the World by Amer Ismail

11:00 - 19 April, 2019
Detailed Globe Drawings of Cities Around the World by Amer Ismail, © Amer Ismail
© Amer Ismail

Amer Ismail, architect-turned-artist based in London, has developed a spectacular set of intricate “Globe Drawings” of cities around the world. Beginning in 2016, Ismail developed these 5-point-perspective drawings with heavy inspiration from artist Stephen Wiltshire. Having spent many years drawings architecture, including time at Foster+Partners, Ismail tasked himself with developing a series that encompassed his “interest for architecture, city planning, travel, drawings, and Star Wars.”

© Amer Ismail © Amer Ismail © Amer Ismail © Amer Ismail + 9

7 Houses of the Future - According to the Past

09:00 - 19 April, 2019
7 Houses of the Future - According to the Past, Rolling Houses (1930s). Image © Angie's List
Rolling Houses (1930s). Image © Angie's List

It is often claimed that “there is nothing more outdated than science fiction.” Indeed, history is awash with speculation on future ways of living, as futurists imagine how advancements in technology, trends, and social norms could alter how we live, and what we live in. The period between 1958 and 1963 could be described as “The Golden Age of American Futurism” where technological milestones such as the founding of NASA coincided with cultural icons such as The Jetsons. Some of this era’s wildest ideas centered on how the houses of the future would look.

Space Houses (1960s). Image © Angie's List Glass Houses (1920s). Image © Angie's List Moving Houses (1920s). Image © Angie's List Underwater Houses (1960s). Image © Angie's List + 8

How Are Fiber Cement Panels Created?

07:00 - 19 April, 2019
How Are Fiber Cement Panels Created?, Denver Botanic Gardens / Burkettdesign. Image Courtesy of Swisspearl
Denver Botanic Gardens / Burkettdesign. Image Courtesy of Swisspearl

At the start, train cars stand ready with cement and bales of fibers. A machine processes the mixture layer by layer into panels of the desired size and thickness. However, some specific production knowledge must be considered in the manufacture of the building material. Marco Ziethen, Swisspearl’s head of production technology, explains us the fabrication process of fiber cement.

Bus Station / Guzic Trplan Arhitekti . Image Courtesy of Swisspearl Denver Botanic Gardens / Burkettdesign. Image Courtesy of Swisspearl Bus Station / Guzic Trplan Arhitekti . Image Courtesy of Swisspearl Denver Botanic Gardens / Burkettdesign. Image Courtesy of Swisspearl + 15

21 Ways Architects Can Work Smarter, Not Harder

06:30 - 19 April, 2019
© Rawpixel via Shutterstock
© Rawpixel via Shutterstock

In their day-to-day work, architects face a lot of distractions and challenges: managing clients, collaborators and contractors; keeping up to date with the latest software and technologies; drafting planning applications and paperwork; and if you're lucky, even getting to design some things in between. Originally published by ArchSmarter, this post offers 21 tips on how to maximize your productivity and minimize unnecessary work.

Project schedules are getting shorter and shorter. Building types are getting more complex. We already work hard but there are only so many hours in the day. As architects, we need to work smarter, not harder. How can we maximize our effectiveness and our efficiency? How can we manage the increasing flow of information? How can we design better, faster?

Here are 21 ways you can work smarter, not harder:

By the People, For the People: What is Public Architecture, According to our Readers

05:00 - 19 April, 2019
Aarhus Harbor Bath / BIG. Image: © Rasmus Hjortshøj
Aarhus Harbor Bath / BIG. Image: © Rasmus Hjortshøj

Last week, we asked our social media followers, "What does public architecture mean to you?" These thoughts are intrinsic to the architectural debate and come into play in various types of projects, especially in those related to the planning of common-use spaces in cities.

Siza: Unseen and Unknown

04:00 - 19 April, 2019
 Siza: Unseen and Unknown, Portrait of Álvaro Siza, drawn by his wife: Maria Antónia Siza Ca. 1970-73, India ink on paper (30 × 21 cm). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation
Portrait of Álvaro Siza, drawn by his wife: Maria Antónia Siza Ca. 1970-73, India ink on paper (30 × 21 cm). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation

The Tchoban Foundation - Museum for Architectural Drawing in Berlin shared with us this article about the exhibition Siza: Unseen and Unknown curated by architect António Choupina together with Dr. h. c. Kristin Feireiss. According to them, "this exhibition was conceived as a family show, not in the sense of an architectural dynasty but rather as a lyrical collection of drawings from the architect’s private surroundings". The selected drawings are from the Siza family’s own collection and include sketches from known and less well-known projects, as well as architectural fantasies.

Álvaro Siza was born in 1933, on the same year that the Bauhaus closed its doors. He is perhaps the last living modernist or, at the very least, the most significant voice to carry out the unfinished modernist project all the way into the 21st century.

Siza: Unseen and Unknown showcases this continuity through 100 sketches, as well as its unavoidable contradictions. These drawings are from his most personal archive, in addition to small collections of close friends and family. Hence, they focus not only on the professional legacy but also on the familial one, where Maria Antónia Siza (1940-1973) takes centre stage. His wife will draw him, he will draw her and the loving embrace of the human body will be transversal to architecture, art, life.

When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete

06:30 - 18 April, 2019
When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete, Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant
Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant

Koshino House, Ashiya-shi / Japan. Image © Kazunori Fujimoto Church of the Light, Osaka / Japan. Image © Naoya Fujii Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth / USA. Image © Todd Landry Photography Screenshot of video of Hill of the Buddha at the Makomanai Takino Cemetery, Sapporo / Japan. Image © Hokkaido Fan Magazine + 8

If there is any consistent factor in his work, says Pritzker-winning architect Tadao Ando, then it is the pursuit of light. Ando’s complex choreography of light fascinates most when the viewer experiences the sensitive transitions within his architecture. Sometimes walls wait calmly for the moment to reveal striking shadow patterns, and other times water reflections animate unobtrusively solid surfaces. His combination of traditional Japanese architecture with a vocabulary of modernism has contributed greatly to critical regionalism. While he is concerned with individual solutions that have a respect for local sites and contexts Ando’s famous buildings – such as the Church of the Light, Koshino House or the Water Temple – link the notion of regional identity with a modern imagining of space, material and light. Shoji walls with diffuse light are reinterpreted in the context of another culture, for instance, filtered through the lens of Rome’s ancient Pantheon, where daylight floods through an oculus. Ando’s masterly imagination culminates in planning spatial sequences of light and dark like he envisioned for the Fondation d’Art Contemporain François Pinault in Paris.

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