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What's the Difference Between a B.Arch and M.Arch Degree?

09:30 - 20 July, 2018
What's the Difference Between a B.Arch and M.Arch Degree? , <a href="https://www.archdaily.com/179854/milstein-hall-at-cornell-university-oma-2">Milstein Hall, at Cornell University's College of Architecture, designed by OMA</a>. Image © Matthew Carbone
Milstein Hall, at Cornell University's College of Architecture, designed by OMA. Image © Matthew Carbone

The process of becoming an architect can be as confusing as it is extensive. In this article, we'll demystify a crucial component of the path to a career in architecture: what degree you should get. Specifically, we’ll lay out the difference between two common, somewhat comparable degrees: the B.Arch and the M.Arch.

The Best Universities in Latin America That Have Architecture Programs

16:00 - 19 July, 2018
The Best Universities in Latin America That Have Architecture Programs, © <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:The_Photographer">The Photographer</a>, used under <a href="http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en">CC0</a>. Image Teatro Municipal in São Paulo, the city with the most universities featured in the regional ranking of the Times Higher Universities
© The Photographer, used under CC0. Image Teatro Municipal in São Paulo, the city with the most universities featured in the regional ranking of the Times Higher Universities

Times Higher Education (THE) revealed its ranking of the best universities in Latin America and the Caribean. The list is based on the same 13 indicators used in their global ranking, but with modifications that "better reflect the characteristics of Latin American universities," explains the organization. 

The 2018 edition of this regional ranking includes 129 universities from 10 countries rated in the following categories: teaching, research, citations, international outlook, industry income. It should be noted that this measurement is global at the university level and does not measure each academic concentration separately, as QS does in its annual ranking.

Dominated by universities in Brazil, we present the 10 best Latin American universities for architecture, according to Times Higher Education (THE).

Design Accessible Bathrooms for All With This ADA Restroom Guide

15:15 - 19 July, 2018
Design Accessible Bathrooms for All With This ADA Restroom Guide, ADA Design Guide / Washrooms & Showers. Image Courtesy of Bradley Corporation USA
ADA Design Guide / Washrooms & Showers. Image Courtesy of Bradley Corporation USA

In this article, we provide you with the tools to design more inclusive architecture. Although each region and country has its own accessibility guidelines which you should review in depth before starting a project, the material presented below, based on the ADA and ANSI standards, will help you design comfortable and efficient spaces for all its users.

Read on for detailed diagrams with the recommended measures to design an accessible bathroom.

100 Years of Mass Housing in Russia

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100 Years of Mass Housing in Russia, Gorky street (Tverskaya st.), Moscow, 1978. Image Courtesy of Vasily Egorov, TASS
Gorky street (Tverskaya st.), Moscow, 1978. Image Courtesy of Vasily Egorov, TASS

Russia’s history of mass housing development can be divided into several distinct periods, each manifested by its own specific type of residential building. These houses reveal what lifestyle, comfort level, construction cost and distinctive traits were considered preferable in any given decade. Every new stage saw its own experiments and had its achievements, which together can be regarded as a line of lessons, discoveries, and experiences, helping to understand a specific character of Russian standard housing.

What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments?

16:30 - 18 July, 2018
What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments? , © Yves Bachmann
© Yves Bachmann

As I left the streets of Zurich after attending a conference about the quality of life in urban environments, I came across a living example of the lecture I had just attended. I turned the corner and felt that I was inside an architectural rendering: the trees were pruned and green, there were no hanging electrical wires, cyclists drove elegantly along bike lanes, the tram moved quietly and punctually while bathers enjoyed their summer in rivers and lakes. To my surprise, I walked under an overpass and realized that even urban cities could be skilled and safe. After my stroll, I stopped for a cup of coffee and knew that the person that attended me received a fair salary and did not have to work three jobs to pay the bills (of course the coffee did not come cheap). However, these small, almost mundane observations for some, do provide a well-being and quality of life that may be difficult to measure. 

Forget "Post-Digital": Why Technological Innovation in Architecture is Only Just Getting Started

09:30 - 18 July, 2018
Forget "Post-Digital": Why Technological Innovation in Architecture is Only Just Getting Started, Cloud Pergola, the Croatian National Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, is one of the largest robotically extruded 3D-printed structures ever built. The robotic arm was trained to adapt to the unpredictable material behavior, by gleaning real-time feedback from the construction process. The installation was designed by Alisa Andrasek (with Bruno Juricic and Madalin Gheorghe), engineered by Arup London, and fabricated by Ai Build. Image © Luke Hayes
Cloud Pergola, the Croatian National Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, is one of the largest robotically extruded 3D-printed structures ever built. The robotic arm was trained to adapt to the unpredictable material behavior, by gleaning real-time feedback from the construction process. The installation was designed by Alisa Andrasek (with Bruno Juricic and Madalin Gheorghe), engineered by Arup London, and fabricated by Ai Build. Image © Luke Hayes

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Post-Digital Will Be Even More Digital, Says Mario Carpo."

Book presentations, or book launches, are holdovers from ages long past. One could argue that the same applies to books in print themselves; but we still read and write books, never mind in which shape and form, while I do not see many reasons to keep presenting them in brick-and-mortar bookshops, or similar venues. Friends in the publishing industry tell me that a single tweet, or a successful hashtag on Instagram, can sell more copies than a book launch—and at a lesser cost, for sure. Besides, one of the most baffling aspects of book launches is that, traditionally—and I remember this was already the case when I was a student—a significant fraction of the public in attendance tends to be viscerally and vocally hostile to the topic of the book being presented. Why would readers who dislike a book as a plain matter of principle take the time to read it in full then vent their anger at its author, I cannot tell; but this is to say that having published a book last fall titled The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence, I had plenty of opportunities, in the course of the last few months, to glean a vast repertoire of technophobic commonplaces. Chiefly noted among them, due to its sheer outlandishness, was the objection that digital innovation would by now have fully run its course: having adapted to, and adopted, some new tools and technologies, architects would have moved on, free at last to get back to things that really matter to them (whatever they might be).

Explore the Local Wood Work of Chiloé Island, Chile

08:00 - 18 July, 2018

Chiloé is a five-part video series produced by Glaciar Films and directed by Diego Breit and David Guzmán; it explores the architectural identity of the southern island off of Chile. Architects, carpenters, artisans, and inhabitants present the constructive history of the island and explore how it is faced with the imminent changes of modern production and practices.

Glaciar Films has made three of the five episodes available to ArchDaily readers. In these clips, explore the island's architecture along with interviews with principal architects of the region: Jonah Retamal, Edward Rojas, and Macarena Almonacid.

Learning New Design Viz Methods—Is It Worth It?

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Learning New Design Viz Methods—Is It Worth It?, Tower Studio by Pawel Mielnik, rendered in real time with Unreal Engine
Tower Studio by Pawel Mielnik, rendered in real time with Unreal Engine

Design visualization just keeps reaching new heights. While renderings remain a common part of design presentation, advances in technology have made new types of media not only possible but within the reach of even small teams and firms. These newer types of media require a change in workflow. Is it worth it?

Online Revit Courses for Beginners and Experts

08:00 - 17 July, 2018
Online Revit Courses for Beginners and Experts, Course: "Revit 2019: Essential Training for Architecture (Imperial)". Image © Lynda.com
Course: "Revit 2019: Essential Training for Architecture (Imperial)". Image © Lynda.com

As one of the most-used BIM software products around the world, there are a large number of tutorials and online courses that help us to get started in using Revit, or to become an advanced user and take advantage of its many tools. Do you just want to become familiar with its interface so that you can start using it in your projects? Do you need to learn how to link it with AutoCAD or 3ds Max? Don't know how to render or present the results of your models? These courses promise to teach you how.

How Long Does it Take to Become an Architect?

07:00 - 17 July, 2018
How Long Does it Take to Become an Architect?, Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez
Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez

Before deciding on a career in architecture, plenty of questions can cross one’s mind: Which school should I choose? Should I study abroad or choose a local school? Would enrolling in top international universities cost me a fortune? How long will it take for me to finally be able to build my own structure? At the end of the day, the making of an architect is pretty simple: half a decade of architecture studies, and then some.

Whether you are considering studying abroad or staying home, you'll need to know how long it takes to become an architect in your country of choice. Take a look at how long it usually takes to earn that degree in different countries from all over the world, and what you'll need to do (aside from attending school) before becoming a certified architect.

45 Construction Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know

09:30 - 16 July, 2018
45 Construction Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know, Dune Art Museum. Image Courtesy of Open Architecture
Dune Art Museum. Image Courtesy of Open Architecture

For most recent graduates, it quickly becomes evident that what you learn in architecture school is not necessarily enough to become a confident architect. Some things can’t be taught in classrooms at all; instead, they're acquired through years of work on site and solving construction problems first-hand. Among the many things you learn on site are the terminologies used by construction workers that can sound like absolute nonsense to architects at first.

An architecture dictionary might seem like a superb idea, but in practice wouldn't be convenient on a construction site—unless you can memorize the useful entries out of the 25,000 terms in Cyril M Harris' Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Alternatively, here’s a more manageable list of 45 construction terms and concepts every architect should know.

Cross Bracing. Image <a href='https://pxhere.com/en/photo/970928'>via pxhere</a> (public domain)  Precast Concrete blocks used in Frank Lloyd Wright's Tonkens House. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Example_of_precast_concrete_blocks_in_the_Tonkens_House._Photo_courtesy_of_Toby_Oliver..jpg'>Wikimedia user Factfile8</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> Virtual Design & Construction. Image <a href='https://pxhere.com/en/photo/547880'>via pxhere</a> (public domain) Diagrid. Image <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/VIrwcwdr2Bc'>via Unsplash</a> (public domain) + 11

Space-Saving Solutions: 33 Creative Storage Ideas

12:00 - 15 July, 2018
Space-Saving Solutions: 33 Creative Storage Ideas, © Federico Villa
© Federico Villa

© Hey! Cheese © Kat Lu © Hey! Cheese © Kai Nakamura + 34

The lack of storage space is a recurrent problem in homes. In most cases, residual spaces or uncomfortable corners are used to solve the lack of shelves, drawers, and closets. To efficiently incorporate these type of spaces into your designs, here are 33 remarkable storage examples.

These Are the 5 Most Colorful Cities in the Americas

08:00 - 13 July, 2018
These Are the 5 Most Colorful Cities in the Americas, Havana. Foto: Bigstock. Image Cortesia de HAUS
Havana. Foto: Bigstock. Image Cortesia de HAUS

The grays of concrete and pollution are not the only representation of cities and towns in the Americas. As perfect postcard material, many cities in the new world express the vibrancy of the people and places through color. HAUS, ArchDaily's partner, has selected five of these cities, which show us how color can bring light to the day-to-day life of cities. 

Learn About Open Floor Plans Via These 6 Iconic Residences

06:00 - 13 July, 2018
Learn About Open Floor Plans Via These 6 Iconic Residences, Villa Tugendhat / Mies van der Rohe. © Alexandra Timpau
Villa Tugendhat / Mies van der Rohe. © Alexandra Timpau

Le Corbusier's "Five Points of Architecture" functioned in the twentieth century as the go-to guide for architectural production; it is also a significant work in understanding the legacy of modern architecture. Horizontal windows, free design of the facade, pilotis, roof gardens, and perhaps the most significant point, free design of the ground plan form the Franco-Swiss architect's manifesto. In terms of design practice, this last point means distinguishing structure and wrapper, which allows the free disposal of dividing walls that no longer fulfill a structural function. 

Residential projects were once characterized by a clear division of environments linked to domestic dynamics, now filtered by modern discourse, the house became flexible and capable of new spatial articulations.

To better understand the modern domestic space, we gathered some of the most emblematic examples of residences and their floor plans.

Tadao Ando’s Liangzhu Village Cultural Art Centre Through the Lens of Zheng Shi

16:30 - 12 July, 2018
Tadao Ando’s Liangzhu Village Cultural Art Centre Through the Lens of Zheng Shi, © Zheng Shi
© Zheng Shi

The historic Liangzhu Village in Hangzhou, China has a new monumental cultural center by the Japanese architect Tadao Ando. Opened in 2016, the building has become another popular cultural site in the village following the opening of David Chipperfield’s Liangzhu Museum a decade ago.

© Zheng Shi © Zheng Shi © Zheng Shi © Zheng Shi + 39

How Luis Barragán Used Light to Make Us See Color

09:30 - 12 July, 2018
How Luis Barragán Used Light to Make Us See Color, © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive
© 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive

In Luis Barragán’s poetic imagination color plays as significant a role as dimension or space. Rough textures and water reflections heighten the impact of bright sunlight in his colorful buildings. But where does such vibrancy come from and how is it heightened by the architecture itself?

© 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive + 6

The Architecture Behind a Brave Racoon's Viral Skyscraper Climb

09:30 - 11 July, 2018
The Architecture Behind a Brave Racoon's Viral Skyscraper Climb, © Evan Frost/<a href='https://www.mprnews.org/'>MPR News</a>
© Evan Frost/MPR News

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "SOM Explains Exactly How a Raccoon Scaled Its St. Paul Skyscraper."

After completing Town Square, a mixed-use, double-tower complex in the heart of St. Paul, Minnesota in 1980, the late architect Donald Smith of SOM told Architectural Record magazine, “We must reorient our attention to the center [of] cities to save them.”

Smith’s words were prophetic, it turns out, but not in the way he may have expected.

Last month, Town Square—now known as UBS Plaza—captured the attention of the globe as a scraggly, wayward raccoon climbed up its southern tower’s 25 stories.

The rough, exposed aggregate concrete facade allowed the raccoon to scale the building like a tree. Image © Evan Frost/<a href='https://www.mprnews.org/'>MPR News</a> When completed in 1980, SOM's Town Square project in St. Paul (designed by the firm's Denver office) was a prime example of late-'70s mixed use buildings. Image Courtesy of SOM / © Hedrich Blessing The complex, as late architect Donald Smith told Architectural Record at the time, aimed to foster development in urban centers "in terms of people, not the automobile". Image Courtesy of SOM / © Hedrich Blessing Detail of the building's concrete facade system. Image Courtesy of SOM + 7

Why Stadiums Made of Wood Could Be the Next Big Innovation in Sports Architecture

09:30 - 10 July, 2018
Why Stadiums Made of Wood Could Be the Next Big Innovation in Sports Architecture, A rendering of a stadium constructed with Bear Stadiums and Rubner Holzbau’s modular wood systems. Image Courtesy of Rubner Holzbau
A rendering of a stadium constructed with Bear Stadiums and Rubner Holzbau’s modular wood systems. Image Courtesy of Rubner Holzbau

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Could Modular Wood Stadium Construction Be a Game Changer?"

Imagine a sports stadium that could expand and contract with its fan base and team’s fortunes, one that could pick up and move to greener (and more lucrative) pastures.

Given team owners’ history of playing fans against each other, making stadiums more mobile isn’t likely to give pennant-wavers a sense of security, but the concept is an incredible breakthrough for building technology. Endlessly modular and made of ultralow-impact mass timber, this vision of low-carbon construction, conceived by engineered-wood manufacturer Rubner Holzbau and prefabricated stadium designer Bear Stadiums, could soon materialize at a soccer pitch near you.

This Retractable Bamboo Yurt Can Be Easily Transported and Installed

06:00 - 10 July, 2018
This Retractable Bamboo Yurt Can Be Easily Transported and Installed , © Tommaso Riva
© Tommaso Riva

Tradition and innovation. Those are the two pillars within which Bamboo U's workshop’s creative pendulum strives to swing. Following the practice of ancient Mongolian yurts, participants of Bamboo U, a build and design course in Bali, have created a bamboo yurt which can fold like an umbrella and can be deployed in an instant. Under the guidance of the German master-builder Jörg Stamm, students built the first retractable yurt prototype in Bali during Bamboo U’s last edition in April.

Just Looking at Buildings Can Give People Headaches—Here's How to Minimize the Problem

17:10 - 9 July, 2018
Just Looking at Buildings Can Give People Headaches—Here's How to Minimize the Problem, © Nikola Olic
© Nikola Olic

Architecture can give you a headache. That sentence probably doesn't sound surprising for anyone who has dealt with the stress of practicing or studying architecture but, increasingly, psychologists are beginning to understand that you don't need to work on architectural designs for buildings to cause you pain. In an interesting article published by The Conversation, Arnold J Wilkins, a Professor of Psychology at the University of Essex, discusses how discomfort, headaches, and even migraines can be caused or exacerbated by simply looking at certain visual stimuli—with the straight lines and repetitive patterns of urban environments singled out as the main culprit.

History's Most Notorious Unfinished Buildings

09:30 - 9 July, 2018
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

Both today and in centuries past, it is a reality of building that not every project is destined for success. Financial issues or unrealistic timetables can complicate a building’s construction but, while usually the final result eventually meets the initial expectations, other times the worst-case scenario of a building being abandoned during construction becomes a nightmare come true. Unfortunately, these failed projects have an extensive history. Economic factors are the most common cause of unfinished construction, but buildings have also been stranded in limbo by wars, geopolitical shifts, epidemics of disease and other unpredictable obstacles, leaving partial structures as haunting reminders of what might have been.

Whether partially completed and left as ruins or still under construction decades (or centuries) after initial groundbreaking, unfinished buildings offer an alternative history of our built environment, promising long-delayed gratification or examples of design so ambitious that they prove impossible to realize. Initiated by civilizations across the globe, the following list details just a few examples of history’s most interesting and infamous unfinished construction projects.

Image by Ilya Ilusenko <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Palace_Of_Soviets_8.JPG'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/4675714481'>Flickr user hisgett</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © Raphael Olivier © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tourists_posing_at_the_National_Monument_of_Scotland.jpg'>Wikimedia user Colin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 12

Sombra Verde's 3D Printed Bamboo Structure Bridges the Gap Between Tradition and Technology

08:00 - 9 July, 2018
© Carlos Bañón
© Carlos Bañón

Bridging the gap between the old and the new is never easy. Traditional building methods, where you often adjust to the unpredictability of a natural material, seem to contrast with the mechanical precision of modern construction. Sombra Verde - a bamboo gazebo developed by AIRLAB and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) as part of Singapore’s Urban Design Festival 2018 - bridges this gap. The traditional raw bamboo poles, used extensively throughout Southeast Asia, are combined with 3D printed connectors, utilizing a series of new technologies. The result is an iconic, lightweight structure in Singapore’s Duxton Plain Park that promotes the use of public space, sheltering the population from both the intense sun and heavy rain.

© Carlos Bañón © Aurelia Chan © Carlos Bañón © Aurelia Chan + 24

Architecture Photos That Show Good Design Goes with Good Boys

06:00 - 9 July, 2018
Architecture Photos That Show Good Design Goes with Good Boys, Casa Dox / Mjölk architekti. Image © BoysPlayNice
Casa Dox / Mjölk architekti. Image © BoysPlayNice

Casa La Quinta / Pablo Pérez Palacios, Alfonso de la Concha Rojas, Miguel Vargas, Blas Treviño, Jorge Quiroga . Image © Rafael Gamo Casas Catalinas / Agustín Lozada. Image © Gonzalo Viramonte MK5 House / ORTRAUM. Image © Marc Goodwin Unleashed Dog Spa / Square One Interiors. Image © Ihor Pona + 33

Are you a cat or dog lover? At ArchDaily we know that you're as big an animal lover as we are. They inspire us, keep us company, and in the case of architectural photography, give us an idea of a structure's scale. We previously made a collection of photographs starring cats and architecture, and we could never forget our dog-loving readers. We bring you a collection of photographs where dogs take center stage. 

How The Digital Revolution Will Make Cities Produce Everything They Consume… Again

02:30 - 9 July, 2018
How The Digital Revolution Will Make Cities Produce Everything They Consume… Again, The Fab City Summit 2018 will be at Parc de La Villette in Paris © William Beaucardet - "Prairie du Triangle", via LaVilette.com
The Fab City Summit 2018 will be at Parc de La Villette in Paris © William Beaucardet - "Prairie du Triangle", via LaVilette.com

This summer, July 11-13, the annual Fab City Summit will take place in Paris at the Paris City Hall and Parc de La Villette. The yearly event will gather the core team behind the Fab City Global Initiative together with city officials, innovation ecosystems from civic society and industry. Get your tickets with 30% discount using code FABDAILY30.

The rapid urbanization of the 20th century was possible thanks to the Industrial Revolution and the assembly line, which allowed the rapid reproduction and replication of infrastructure, products and repetitive urban patterns in cities around the world. Urban morphology and dynamics produce standard patterns and forms of living. At the same time, and following the linear economy, cities consume most of the world’s resources and generate most of world’s waste (according to the United Nations). However, the exponential growth of digital technologies (computation, communication, fabrication) of the last decades offer the opportunity to enable a transition towards a spiral economy (an open circular economy approach), in which data (and knowledge) flow globally, and materials flow locally: from networks of logistics that move atoms, to networks of information that move bits.