All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Articles

Articles

From the "Eyes on the Street" to the "Eyes of the City"/ Antoine Picon's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennial 2019

07:00 - 2 May, 2019
From the "Eyes on the Street" to the "Eyes of the City"/ Antoine Picon's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennial 2019, The evil protagonist of © Fritz Lang's The Thousand Eyes of Dr. Mabuse
The evil protagonist of © Fritz Lang's The Thousand Eyes of Dr. Mabuse

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at UABB 2019 to set up a discussion on how new technologies - and Artificial Intelligence in particular - might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, Politecnico di Torino, and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” open call until May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

Comparisons, transpositions and metaphors can be misleading if one does not unpack carefully their point of departure. The notion that the digital age introduces us to a new regime of "eyes on the street", an expression famously coined by Jane Jacobs, requires understanding exactly what the author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities implied when she used it. For Jane Jacobs, the active presence of city dwellers in the street, their unconscious or conscious monitoring of what was going on in their immediate surroundings was the best way to ensure public safety. "The public peace — the sidewalk and the street peace— of cities is not kept primarily by the police, necessary as police are. It is kept primarily by an intricate, almost unconscious, network of voluntary controls and standards among the people themselves, and enforced by the people themselves," wrote Jane Jacobs.

11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture)

04:30 - 2 May, 2019
11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture), © Ariana Zilliacus
© Ariana Zilliacus

Architects are often noted for having bad work-life balance, a lot of stress and little free time. How can you take time off while still improving your skills as an architect? Can that time off even give you an extra edge? Compared to other fields, architecture stands out as a field in which you need to “know a little bit about everything." Thus, in order to live up to our name we must also do a little bit of everything, and as they say, a little goes a long way. So with that in mind, here are 11 activities which, while not obviously architectural, just might make you a better architect.

Reaction And Fire Resistance: How Are Materials Classified In The Event Of A Fire?

04:00 - 1 May, 2019
Reaction And Fire Resistance: How Are Materials Classified In The Event Of A Fire?, Conceptual Diagram. Image Cortesía de ArchDaily
Conceptual Diagram. Image Cortesía de ArchDaily

In case of fire, protecting the lives of people is the most important. All occupants of the building should have the opportunity to evacuate on time, and the time available depends largely on the materials chosen and their behavior during fire exposure.

In order to facilitate and optimize this process, the European Union has adopted the Standard EN 13501 [1], introduced in the 2000s, which specifies a series of classes that determines the anti-fire properties of different materials. Their classifications are unified and compared based on the same test methods, and are currently used as a reference in many countries around the world.

Because of the architect’s role in choosing materials for projects, we have compiled the most important nomenclature to better understand the level of security of our built environment.

A Chance to Win Exclusive Mola Structural Kits with their Accessories

08:30 - 30 April, 2019
A Chance to Win Exclusive Mola Structural Kits with their Accessories, Sydney Harbour Bridge made using Mola kit. Image Courtesy of Mola
Sydney Harbour Bridge made using Mola kit. Image Courtesy of Mola

It is often difficult to detect structures' potential deformations and behaviors with the naked eye, which is why interactive education and model-making have proved to be some of the most beneficial methods of learning about structural design.

To help with the learning of structures in a more playful and intuitive way, Brazilian brand Mola, have developed Mola Structural Kits, a selection of interactive physical models that simulate the behavior of architectural structures and create countless design combinations.

Following the success of the Structural Kits 1 and 2, Mola will be launching the Mola Structural Kit 3 in a Kickstarter campaign in a couple of weeks, and to celebrate, the innovative company has once again teamed up with ArchDaily for another exclusive giveaway, offering 10 of our readers the chance to win a complete structural kit, along with additional accessories.

Courtesy of Mola Courtesy of Mola Courtesy of Mola Stansted Airport by Foster + Partners assembled using Mola kit. Image Courtesy of Mola + 7

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C

07:00 - 30 April, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C , © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next couple of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it. 

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters A, B, and C.

Never miss a good story - subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Preserving Overlooked Brutalist Architecture in India

04:00 - 30 April, 2019
Preserving Overlooked Brutalist Architecture in India, NDDB Building . Image © Arhan Vohra
NDDB Building . Image © Arhan Vohra

Brutalism is merely a basic equation of reinforced concrete + geometry, but while the result of this equation is rather minimal, the architecture movement remains as one of the most debatable styles, ranging between “fascinating structures” and “is it even worth preserving”.

While many perceive Brutalism as “ugly” or “incomplete”, 17 year-old Arhan Vohra found glory in these modernist structures and launched Brutal Delhi, a photography website of New Delhi’s Brutalist buildings, shot through his camera lens.

NDDB Building . Image © Arhan Vohra NDMC Building . Image © Arhan Vohra The Shri Ram Centre for Performing Arts. Image © Arhan Vohra NCDC Building . Image © Arhan Vohra + 11

Notre-Dame and the Questions It Raises About Sacred Space

06:30 - 28 April, 2019
© Flickr user la_bretagne_a_paris licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© Flickr user la_bretagne_a_paris licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Notre-Dame and the Questions It Raises About Sacred Space."

Sharon Zukin on Privately Managed Public Spaces, Gentrification and Urban Authenticity

08:00 - 27 April, 2019
Sharon Zukin on Privately Managed Public Spaces, Gentrification and Urban Authenticity, © The Midnight Charette
© The Midnight Charette

The Midnight Charette is an explicit podcast about design, architecture, and the everyday. Hosted by architectural designers David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, it features a variety of creative professionals in unscripted and long-format conversations that allow for thoughtful takes and more personal discussions. Honesty and humor are used to cover a wide array of subjects: some episodes provide useful tips for designers, while others are project reviews, interviews, or simply explorations of everyday life and design. The Midnight Charette is available for free on iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, and all other podcast directories.

On this episode of The Midnight Charette Podcast, Sharon Zukin discusses the economic and social impact the technology industry has had on cities around the world, the relationship between gentrification and the commodification of modern life, building improvement districts and the increasing securitization of public spaces, and the desire to live in authentic neighborhoods.

10 Examples of Public Spaces from the Beaches to the Cities of Mexico

06:30 - 27 April, 2019

Parque Los Héroes / Francisco Pardo Arquitecto. Image © Jaime Navarro Cancha "La Doce" / All Arquitectura. Image © Zaickz Moz Monumento Emblematico al 150 Aniversario de la Batalla de Puebla / TEN Arquitectos. Image © Luis Gordoa Parque Lineal Ferrocarril de Cuernavaca / Gaeta-Springall arquitectos. Image © Arturo Arrieta + 12

Urban design is a branch of design intimately related to urban planning and landscape architecture; it focuses broadly on interpreting the form and public space with physical-aesthetic-functional criteria. Different experts in the field such as Jane Jacobs, Denise Scott Brown, Robert Venturi, Jaime Lerner, Jan Gehl, Kevin Lynch have devoted themselves to studying the needs of urban societies within the common spaces to give adequate responses to different contexts. These questions are renewed with new generations and the public space is transformed according to technological advances but what always remains is the sense of belonging of these sites that are only successful when users adopt them as own.

A Complementary Architectural Dialogue of Past and Present in the Refurbishment of Hotel Fouquet Barrière

07:00 - 26 April, 2019
A Complementary Architectural Dialogue of Past and Present in the Refurbishment of Hotel Fouquet Barrière, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Although ancient buildings carry compelling architectural presence, demolition or radical change is often their fate. While some architects prefer to introduce thoroughly new structures, others choose to honor the works of historic architects, who built the basis and foundations of structures that helped shape up cities today.

For the refurbishment of ParisHotel Fouquet Barrière, located one block facing Avenue des Champs Elysées, Edouard François was selected to renovate the entire property, including offices, spa services, façade, and courtyards. François’ design strategy was rather unambiguous, using only two keywords as reference: “COPY-EDIT”; a reinterpretation of the “old” through contemporary technologies and modified material.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 18

Spotlight: Peter Zumthor

06:30 - 26 April, 2019
The Therme Vals. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG
The Therme Vals. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Known for his sensuous materiality and attention to place, 2009 Pritzker Laureate Peter Zumthor (born April 26, 1943) is one the most revered architects of the 21st century. Shooting to fame on the back of The Therme Vals and Kunsthaus Bregenz, completed just a year apart in 1996 and 1997, his work privileges the experiential qualities of individual buildings over the technological, cultural and theoretical focus often favored by his contemporaries.

Bruder Klaus Field Chapel. Image © Samuel Ludwig Steilneset Memorial. Image © Andrew Meredith Saint Benedict Chapel. Image © Felipe Camus Kunsthaus Bregenz. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/heyitschili/4163419615'>Flickr user heyitschili</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> + 16

Spotlight: Gert Wingårdh

04:00 - 26 April, 2019
Spotlight: Gert Wingårdh, Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström
Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström

One of Sweden’s most esteemed living architects, Gert Wingårdh (born 26 April 1951) brought Swedish architecture out of the tradition of the International Style and into contemporary times with his playful design spirit and love of eye-catching materials. With his use of bright colors and geometric motifs, his recent buildings have been described as "Maximalist" or "Modern Baroque."

Aula Medica. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Kuggen. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Facts Emporia. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström Quality Hotel Friends / Karolina Keyzer + Wingårdhs. Image © Tord-Rikard Söderström + 15

What is Co-Living?

04:30 - 25 April, 2019
What is Co-Living?, Cortesia de WeWork
Cortesia de WeWork

Many of us have already lived, are living, or will live in a shared student house - a good mix of cheap housing and intense socializing with friends and school mates. For a reasonable price, it is possible to have a single private room and share common spaces. In fact, not only university students are living this way nowadays. The concept of co-living is becoming more and more an attractive and effective solution.

Watch Daniel Libeskind's Advice for Young Architects

08:30 - 24 April, 2019

Louisiana Channel has released a video interview conducted with world-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, where he advises young architects to follow their dreams, take risks, and expose themselves to the possibilities of short term sacrifice for long term gain. Reflecting on the pace of change, Libeskind says “the world is always changing, but not very slowly. It changes just suddenly. It doesn’t change by evolution, it changes suddenly. If a young architect realizes this, it is a big help. It took me a while to realize that.”

Top Tips for BIM Beginners

06:30 - 24 April, 2019
Top Tips for BIM Beginners, Cortesía de Academia BIM
Cortesía de Academia BIM

When you start to consider implementing the BIM (Building Information Modeling) methodology, whether as an independent professional or as a construction firm, it's necessary to take into account three key aspects: the technology, the process, and the people who bring it all together. In this article, we will address the key points in every one of these three aspects in order to give you insight into how to best start using BIM.

5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit

Sponsored Article
5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit, Courtesy of Workshop Architects, Cooper Carry, OLIN, and Gilbane
Courtesy of Workshop Architects, Cooper Carry, OLIN, and Gilbane

Today in the United States, buildings account for nearly 40% of carbon emissions (EESI) and 78% of electricity usage. The most sustainability-focused firms run energy simulations for less than 50% of their projects (10% for a typical firm) and only doing so late in the process when design changes are limited and insufficient to combat red flags found in the performance report (AIA 2030 report). We can make building performance widespread once we help the entire community discuss the subject in terms of investment and return. Especially during a project pursuit, since having the buy in from the whole team helps ensure the key project metrics are met. Owners are seeking out teams who are using actual metrics and data driven processes that affect their bottom line. This new approach to practice is what makes the younger teams’ standout and will benefit both the climate and the bottom-line. Here are 5 ways to talk about building performance in your project pursuits: 

We Are Looking Back! / Yung Ho Chang's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennial 2019

05:20 - 23 April, 2019
We Are Looking Back! / Yung Ho Chang's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennial 2019, Installation Looking for Palladio. Image© FCJZ
Installation Looking for Palladio. Image© FCJZ

Archdaily is working with the "Eyes of the City" curatorial team, to publish a series of articles by international architects, designers, writers and thinkers who will discuss the ways in which new technologies - and Artificial Intelligence in particular - might impact architecture and urban life. After the publication of the curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, Politecnico di Torino and SCUT, we are hosting a text by Chinese architect Yung Ho Chang, curator of the first edition of Shenzhen Biennale in 2005. The open call for proposals for the “Eyes of the City” will run from April 1st to May 31st: www.eyesofthecity.net

The American University in Dubai Celebrates the Work of Students at the Yearly Architecture Senior Showcase

Sponsored Article

The Bachelor of Architecture (B. ARCH) at the American University in Dubai was inaugurated in the fall of 2009 and much like Dubai, is young, dynamic, and has achieved considerable milestones over a short period of which NAAB accreditation is at the top. The architecture department along with the Interior Design and the Visual communication departments make up the School of Architecture, Art, and Design (SAAD), which is the only school outside of the USA to have obtained the three primary accreditations (NAAB, CIDA, and NASAD). These accreditations reflect high education standards and quality assurance of SAAD’s programs.

How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change

09:00 - 22 April, 2019
How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change, © SCAPE/City of Boston
© SCAPE/City of Boston

As the world recognizes Earth Day 2019, the public discourse is increasingly dominated by citizen action across the world manifesting a widespread fear and frustration at a perceived lack of action by governments and officials to confront the issue forthrightly. From the Extinction Rebellion protests that have gripped London, to school student strikes across 125 countries, global cities are increasingly finding themselves on the front line of a battle to limit the effects of global warming.

“We Want to Enjoy the Work, Enjoy the Fight”: In Conversation with Qing Fei and Frank Fu of Renhe Architecture

10:00 - 21 April, 2019
“We Want to Enjoy the Work, Enjoy the Fight”: In Conversation with Qing Fei and Frank Fu of Renhe Architecture, Quake Projects, Minle Houses, Mianzh. Image © Renhe Architecture
Quake Projects, Minle Houses, Mianzh. Image © Renhe Architecture

Last year I was invited to teach design studio for the first time by Tsinghua University in Beijing, home to the top architecture school in China and one of the strongest in the world, according to the latest international ratings. There, I met husband-and-wife teaching practitioners Qing Fei and Frank Fu. As soon as I witnessed their unorthodox way of teaching by challenging students with rigorous questioning, I wanted to interview them. Their innovative approach did not fit my impression of how architecture is tackled in China. Fei and Fu are Tsinghua graduates; they moved to America in the late 1980s where they studied, worked, and researched both art and architecture for almost two decades.

Easter Egg Hunt: Architecture Edition

06:30 - 21 April, 2019
Easter Egg Hunt: Architecture Edition , © Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond

Now that it's time for the Easter Holidays, kids (and young-at-heart adults) will be busy searching for colorful eggs hidden here and there. As for you architecture lovers, illustrator Chanel Dehond took egg hunts to the next level and found a way to make the activity a bit more relatable.

Take a look at Dehond's eggceptional collection of illustrations, inspired by some of your favorite structures from all over the world.

© Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond © Chanel Dehond + 22

Capturing the Beauty of Singapore’s Diverse Architecture

04:00 - 21 April, 2019

If you come to think of it, the urban development of the world's largest cities is like playing a game of Tetris; No matter how condensed or crowded, for architects, there is always room for more. However, this act of 'structural stacking' often creates unique architectural compositions.

As a follow-up to his first photo-series, Singaporean photographer and visual artist Kevin Siyuan put together 'Corridors of Diversity', a short montage of communal corridors and HDB (Housing and Development Board) block facades, featuring the dynamic designs and forms of Singapore's densely built environment.

"We Designed an Exhibition that Presents the Bauhaus in all its Dazzling Diversity": Barbara Holzer Explains her Design for the New Bauhaus Museum

10:00 - 20 April, 2019
"We Designed an Exhibition that Presents the Bauhaus in all its Dazzling Diversity": Barbara Holzer Explains her Design for the New Bauhaus Museum, Tomás Saraceno "Sundial for Spatial Echoes“. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture
Tomás Saraceno "Sundial for Spatial Echoes“. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture

On the weekend of the 5th-7th of April, the city of Weimar celebrated the opening of the recently-completed Bauhaus Museum, along with its permanent exhibition of the 100-year history of Bauhaus.

Located near the Neue Museum, the concrete structure was designed by German architect Prof. Heike Hanada. The architect followed the school’s minimalist approach, and developed a 5-storey cubic building, with a clearly defined geometric form and horizontal grooves all around the facade. The museum’s permanent exhibition, which was designed and curated by Barbara Holzer of Holzer Kobler Architekturen, houses the world’s oldest Bauhaus collection, bringing forth debates on contemporary design and showcasing the school’s most notable inventions.

In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily, Holzer explains the creative process of designing the exhibition space, and some of the challenges she faced while exhibiting Bauhaus' distinguished works.

Exhibition Space . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Stage . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Theodor Bogler, Stock Canc, 1923. Image © Vereinigung der Benediktiner to Maria Laach e.V. Mies van der Rohe. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture + 31

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.