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Rebuilding Nigeria: When Architecture Is About Restoring Culture

06:00 - 25 August, 2019
Rebuilding Nigeria: When Architecture Is About Restoring Culture, © Kaizenify Via Wikimedia Commons licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
© Kaizenify Via Wikimedia Commons licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

For the past decade, Nigeria has lived under the crushing specter of attacks by the terrorist group Boko Haram. From Maiduguri to Abuja, bombs have exploded intermittently, killing hundreds, destroying thousands of homes, and crippling public infrastructure. In recent years, the Nigerian military has liberated several captive communities and begun reconstruction work in a number of them. Sadly, the aftereffects of these violent convulsions have profoundly reshaped our cities. The attacks utterly upended lives: shattering basic civic amenities, disrupting livelihoods, and forcing residents to rebuild from scratch while still grieving for family and friends.

Unique Silhouettes of the Berlin Philharmonic Through the Lens of Bahaa Ghoussainy

04:00 - 25 August, 2019
Unique Silhouettes of the Berlin Philharmonic Through the Lens of Bahaa Ghoussainy , © Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

The Berlin Philharmonic by Hans Scharoun is one of the most prominent mid-20th century structures in the German city. The expressionist-style building with its bright-colored facade is the first of its kind by the German architect, as well as his most famous project to date. Scharoun’s design interprets rhythm and music as architecture, both conceptually and physically.

Architectural photographer Bahaa Ghoussainy unfolds Scharoun’s unique architecture by highlighting the concert hall’s dramatic angular geometry, vibrant yellow-hued facade, and play of lines and forms.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 19

Concrete Architecture: 20 Outstanding Projects in Mexico

08:00 - 24 August, 2019
Concrete Architecture: 20 Outstanding Projects in Mexico, SFER IK Museion en Francisco Uh May / Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel. Image Cortesía de Azulik
SFER IK Museion en Francisco Uh May / Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel. Image Cortesía de Azulik

Foro Boca / Rojkind Arquitectos. Image © Jaime Navarro Casa Lomas / Oficio Taller. Image © Adrián Llaguno / Documentación Arquitectónica y The Raws Club de Niños y Niñas / CCA Centro de Colaboración Arquitectónica. Image © Arturo Arrieta Casa Orgánica / Javier Senosiain. Image Cortesía de Javier Senosian + 23

Concrete, a material commonly used in the construction industry, is made of a binder combined with aggregates (or gravels), water, and certain additives. Its origins reach back as far as Ancient Egypt, when the construction of large structures created the need for a new kind of material: one which was liquid, featured properties of natural stones, could be molded, and communicated a sense of nobility and grandeur. 

Progress with Female Ambassadors in Lighting Design

06:00 - 24 August, 2019
Progress with Female Ambassadors in Lighting Design

Light Collective, founders of the project "Women in Lighting", conclude that although female designers seem to make up possibly half of the lighting design profession, their profile appears much lower than men when looking at judges in awards and speakers at major conferences. Sharon Stammers and Martin Lupton started a project with interviews of female lighting designers and contacted conference organizers to enhance their visibility.

Invisible Architecture: the Necessity of Surprise - Eyes and Ears of the City / Ole Bouman for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

07:00 - 23 August, 2019
Invisible Architecture: the Necessity of Surprise - Eyes and Ears of the City / Ole Bouman for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, UABB in Nantou urban village © ZHANG Chao
UABB in Nantou urban village © ZHANG Chao

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

ArchDaily's Ultimate List of Advice for Incoming Architecture Students

09:30 - 22 August, 2019
ArchDaily's Ultimate List of Advice for Incoming Architecture Students, OMA's Milstein Hall at Cornell University shows off the dynamic atmosphere of an architecture school; as students on he ground floor have seminars and crits, other students mill above them. Image © Matthew Carbone
OMA's Milstein Hall at Cornell University shows off the dynamic atmosphere of an architecture school; as students on he ground floor have seminars and crits, other students mill above them. Image © Matthew Carbone

Architecture school. You’ve heard the myths - the legends of all-nighters and innovation, of unmatched workaholism and love for the profession. Perhaps you know what you want – to solve the great urbanization problem, to create the next sustainable wonder-gadget, or maybe just to start your own firm and show the architectural world how it’s done. Maybe you have no idea what you want to do, drawn to architecture by the romance, the larger-than-life scale. Maybe you’re an artist who wants a job when they graduate. A hometown hero, you’re about to be thrown into a classroom of the best, possibly for the first time in your life. You’ll be surrounded by the brightest in engineering, problem solving, writing, drawing and a host of other skills. Anxious and excited, you stand ready at the doors of architectural education, hungry for innovation and ready to share and learn from others. Stepping inside that first day, you prepare yourself for the best - and most difficult times of your life so far.

To prepare you for the strange beast that is architecture school, shed light on what is fact and fiction, and give you some peace of mind, we at ArchDaily have prepared a list of advice for all incoming architecture students. There is no other education in the world quite like an architectural one, and we hope that this list can help prepare you for its unique wonders and challenges. The advice below is meant to ease the transition into school as much as possible – but be warned, nothing can compare to experiencing the real deal. Read them all after the break.

First year review. Image © Steven Lin A lecture in Brooklyn. Image © Ien Boodan © Jeff So The (rare) empty studio. Image © Ien Boodan + 18

What Do The Cracks in Concrete Structures Mean?

07:30 - 22 August, 2019

Cracks, which could be classified according to their thickness as fissures or fractures, are serious problems in the construction industry that can negatively affect aesthetics, durability and, most importantly, the structural characteristics of a project. They can happen anywhere, but occur especially in walls, beams, columns, and slabs, and usually, are caused by strains not considered in the design.

Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?

04:00 - 22 August, 2019
Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?, © Cooper Carry
© Cooper Carry

In a study recently published by AIA, less than 13% of architectural firms have incorporated building performance as part of their practice. With buildings contributing 40% of total carbon emissions leading to climate change, just 25 projects are roughly equivalent to planting 1 million trees each year. In addition to that, teams that are able to showcase data-driven and performance-driven decision-making and feature an energy analysis in every pursuit are able to increase fees and generate more revenue. Although integrating building performance sounds like a no-brainer, it proves to be difficult at many firms, because in addition to the practical changes, it requires a culture shift. That culture shift can only happen if the tools are easy to use, accurate, and mesh well with current workflows. Right now is the perfect time to tackle these culture changes due to a few reasons:

How Do Double-Skin Façades Work?

07:00 - 20 August, 2019
How Do Double-Skin Façades Work? , © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

Double skin façades. Almost a self-explanatory name for façade systems consisting of two layers, usually glass, wherein air flows through the intermediate cavity. This space (which can vary from 20 cm to a few meters) acts as insulation against extreme temperatures, winds, and sound, improving the building's thermal efficiency for both high and low temperatures. Perhaps one of the most famous examples of double-skin facades is Foster+Partners' 30 St Mary Ax Building, "The Gherkin."

The airflow through the intermediate cavity can occur naturally or be mechanically driven, and the two glass layers may include sun protection devices.

© Cemal Emden © Martin Van der Wal © Sergio Grazia © Cemal Emden + 11

Is Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) the Concrete of the Future?

06:30 - 19 August, 2019
Is Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) the Concrete of the Future? , Wood Innovation Design Centre / Michael Green Architecture. Image © Ema Peter
Wood Innovation Design Centre / Michael Green Architecture. Image © Ema Peter

Concrete, an essential building material, has for decades offered us the possibility of shaping our cities quickly and effectively, allowing them to rapidly expand into urban peripheries and reach heights previously unimagined by mankind. Today, new timber technologies are beginning to deliver similar opportunities – and even superior ones – through materials like Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT).

To better understand the properties and benefits of CLT, we talked with Jorge Calderón, Industrial Designer and CRULAMM Manager. He discusses some of the promising opportunities that CLT could provide architecture in the future. 

"KITERASU" Edificio modelo en CLT en la estación Kuse / ofa. Image © Ken'ichi Suzuki MINIMOD Catuçaba / MAPA. Image © Leonardo Finotti Capilla Sacromonte Landscape Hotel / MAPA Arquitetos. Image © Leonardo Finotti Cortesía de Jorge Calderón + 21

The Paris Researcher Pioneering a New Way to Recycle Building Materials

08:00 - 18 August, 2019
The Paris-based designer and researcher Anna Saint Pierre is rethinking architectural preservation through her Granito project, which was awarded the Best Conscious Design prize at this year’s WantedDesign Brooklyn.. Image © Anna Saint Pierre/Rimasùu
The Paris-based designer and researcher Anna Saint Pierre is rethinking architectural preservation through her Granito project, which was awarded the Best Conscious Design prize at this year’s WantedDesign Brooklyn.. Image © Anna Saint Pierre/Rimasùu

Anna Saint Pierre's Granito project is harvesting the ingredients for new architectural building blocks from demolished structures.

Rapid urban change comes and goes without many even noticing it. Entire slices of a city’s history disappear overnight: What was once a wall of hewn stone is now fritted glass and buffed metal. The building site is always, first, a demolition site.

This is the thread that runs through Granito, a project by the young French designer and doctoral researcher Anna Saint Pierre. Developed in response to a late-20th-century Paris office block due for a major retrofit, one involving disassembly, it hinges on a method of material preservation Saint Pierre calls “in situ recycling.” Her proposal posits that harvesting the individual granite panels of the building’s somber gray facade could form the basis of a circular economy. “No longer in fashion,” this glum stone—all 182 tons of it—would be dislodged, pulverized, and sorted on-site, then incorporated into terrazzo flooring in the building update.

The Top 10 Design Cities of 2019

04:00 - 18 August, 2019
The Top 10 Design Cities of 2019, Skanderberg Square / 51N4E, Anri Sala, & Plan en Houtgoed. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin
Skanderberg Square / 51N4E, Anri Sala, & Plan en Houtgoed. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin

Design trends are often the result of foreign cultural influences, avant-garde creations, and innovative solutions for people's ever-evolving needs. Although the design world seems like one big mood board, some cities have managed to outshine the rest with their recent projects.

As part of their annual Design Cities Listing, Metropolis Magazine has highlighted 10 cities across 5 continents with intriguing projects that have harmonized contemporary urbanism with traditional and faraway influences.

How Renderings Can Contribute to Architectural Projects: The Lumion Example

07:30 - 17 August, 2019
How Renderings Can Contribute to Architectural Projects: The Lumion Example, Cortesia de Lumion
Cortesia de Lumion

Over the past two decades, the role of representation and rendering has changed dramatically in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries. New rendering technologies, techniques, and programs, such as Lumion, have been contributing to this change. By including 3D rendering tools, architects and designers can take advantage of easy-to-use, multifunctional visualization technology that serves to strengthen creativity rather than stifle it.

Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State

06:00 - 17 August, 2019
Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State, Church of Our Lady Queen of Poland in Świdnica. Architect: Marian Tunikowski. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image
Church of Our Lady Queen of Poland in Świdnica. Architect: Marian Tunikowski. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image

Church of St Eugene de Mazenod in Kędzierzyn-Koźle. Architect: Alfons Kupka. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of the Holy Spirit in Wrocław. Architects: Waldemar Wawrzyniak, Jerzy Wojnarowicz, Wojciech Święcicki, Tadeusz Zipser. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of Our Lady of Fatima in Kraków. Architects: Przemysław Gawor, Małgorzata Grabacka, Jan Grabacki. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of St Maximilian Kolbe in Kicznia. Architect: Eugeniusz Baziak. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image + 46

In the mid-to-late 20th century, a secular, socialist Poland served as the backdrop for the construction of thousands of Catholic churches. In their book Day-VII Architecture, Izabela Cichonska, Karolina Popera, and Kuba Snopek analyze the paradoxical facets of this architecture born at the intersection of secularity and religion, charting how its development was influenced by liturgical reform, political movements, and the growth of postmodernism. In the excerpted introduction below, the authors unfold this history, touching on the Second Vatican Council, Solidarity, the Iron Curtain, and more in relation to the development of Day-VII Architecture's ultimately unique postmodern style. The publication has collected photographs of 100 Polish churches built after the year 1945, accompanied by interviews with their architects. To read more about the authors' original Day-VII documentation project, which served as the groundwork for this book, be sure to visit the original article "These Churches Are the Unrecognized Architecture of Poland's Anti-Communist 'Solidarity' Movement."

Old Doors and Insulation Foil: 5 Projects that Derive from Russian Culture

04:00 - 17 August, 2019
© Archstoyanie
© Archstoyanie

Russia is an enigmatic country known for its sublime constructivism developed during Soviet times, its greatness and enormous scale. It comes as no shocker — architects, such as Ivan Leonidov and his student Leonid Pavlov, and artists like El Lissitzky, have definitely contributed to the history and image of a strong Russian personality.

Considering the prevalent poverty in Russia, the reason for the fixation on cheap construction is rather clear. However, even local leading architects find something attractive and beautiful in the suburban barns and flimsy dwellings. Creating authentic installations in the shape of houses or changing and enhancing the experience of existing structures with materials at hand, Russian artists and architects express the country's skill of turning the ruined and inhabitable into the lively and cozy.

We Need More Wheelchair Users to Become Architects

04:00 - 16 August, 2019
We Need More Wheelchair Users to Become Architects, © Giordano Aita / Shutterstock
© Giordano Aita / Shutterstock

When famed architect Michael Graves contracted a mysterious virus in 2003, a new chapter in his life began. Paralyzed from the chest down, the pioneer of Postmodernism would be permanently required to use a wheelchair. Graves could have been forgiven for believing that having fought for his life, having been treated in eight hospitals and four rehab clinics, and needing permanent use of a wheelchair, that his most influential days as an architect were behind him. This was not the case. To the contrary, he would use this new circumstance to design trend-setting hospitals, rehab centers, and other typologies right up to his death in 2015, all with a new-found awareness of the everyday realities of those in wheelchairs, and what architects were, and were not doing, to aid their quality of life.

Burning Man's ORB Through the Animated Lens of Another :

07:00 - 15 August, 2019

One of the main attractions of 2018’s Burning Man Festival was the ORB, designed by Bjarke Ingels, Iacob Lange & Laurent de Carniere. The inflated spherical mirror was created as a conceptual representation of Earth and human expression, leaving no trace after its deflation. The project consumed 30 tons of steel, 1,000 welding and sewing hours, and $300,000 of personal funds to make the ORB come to life.

As part of their mini-film series, creative duo another : have collaborated with music composer Yu Miyashita and released a short video that explores the process of creating the ORB in an otherworldly way.

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