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The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture

09:30 - 26 November, 2018
The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Nestled in the steep gorges and river valleys of Japan’s Tokushima prefecture is Kamikatsu - a small town seemingly like any other. But Kamikatsu, unlike its neighbors (or indeed, most towns in the world), is nearly entirely waste-free.

Since 2003 - years before the movement gained widespread popularity - the town has committed to a zero-waste policy. The requirements are demanding: waste must be sorted in more than 30 categories, broken or obsolete items are donated or stripped for parts, unwanted items are left in a store for community exchange. But the residents’ efforts over the years have paid off- nearly 80% of all the village’s waste is recycled.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 20

What Should Architects Be Good At?

04:00 - 26 November, 2018
What Should Architects Be Good At?, © Nicolás Valencia
© Nicolás Valencia

There's a certain rare feeling that all architects share once they leave school: they don't know what they know. Design? Not really. Technical details? You'll need a specialist for that. Can you build this from scratch? I still need some practice. So, what do you really know?

In this article, we'll share six skills that you learned as an architect that you probably aren't even aware of.

Rammed Earth Construction: 15 Exemplary Projects

12:00 - 25 November, 2018
© Nic Lehoux Photography
© Nic Lehoux Photography

© Iwan Baan © Stefan Müller © Norman Müller © Filip Dujardin + 19

This week, we're highlighting a selection of the best images of projects built using rammed earth. These 15 works show the attractive aesthetic finish created by the superposition of multiple layers of compressed soil. Despite having been neglected as a construction technique for years, this type of construction is now experiencing a renaissance in architecture. Read on for a selection of images from prominent photographers such as Filip Dujardin, João Morgado, and Nic Lehoux.

Urban Sketchers Bogotá Pay Tribute to Architect Rogelio Salmona

08:00 - 25 November, 2018
Urban Sketchers Bogotá Pay Tribute to Architect Rogelio Salmona , Cortesía de Mayerlly Cuta
Cortesía de Mayerlly Cuta

Architect Mayerlly Cuta along with the architect and visual artist Carlos Alberto Hernández founded Urban Sketchers Bogotá," a worldwide movement of drawing that promotes the practice of drawing in Bogota streets, capturing real-time life in the city.

From October 24 to November 9, an exhibition was held in homage to architect Rogelio Salmona. According to Cuta, they sought to commemorate the architect 11 years after his death by drawing his present works in the city of Bogotá. "As managers, we began to draw and promote his works. Later converting them into an exhibition. The Colombian Society of Architects and the Rogelio Salmona Foundation joined the project, leading to the Drawing to Salmona Call. This call brought together more than 100 people and collected more than 300 drawings that came from different cities in the country and the world."

How To Improve Acoustic Comfort with Perforated Cardboard Plasterboards

06:00 - 25 November, 2018
How To Improve Acoustic Comfort with Perforated Cardboard Plasterboards, Cortesía de Romeral
Cortesía de Romeral

There are many ways to solve the acoustic comfort of the interior spaces we design, using materials and solutions of different prices and appearances. Perforated cardboard gypsum boards are an economical and efficient option to incorporate into projects, absorbing the sound and reducing the noise level generated by the reverberation through different patterns and shapes.

Applied mainly in schools, offices, shopping centers, restaurants, lobbies, and hospitals, gypsum boards are easy to install and can deliver high-quality aesthetic results in ceilings and coatings.

Universidad Andrés Bello. Image Cortesía de Romeral Universidad Andrés Bello. Image Cortesía de Romeral Cortesía de Romeral Cortesía de Romeral + 15

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This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink

08:00 - 24 November, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink, © Leonardo Finotti
© Leonardo Finotti

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by the massive production of architecture today. Scroll through ArchDaily for more than a minute and even we'd forgive you for losing track of it all. But what seems like an endless scroll of architectural production doesn't quite fit with the popular movements surrounding resource sharing and community. 

Hidden among the mass production that has defined architecture in the last century is a germ - one that seems to be marching to the forefront of practice today. More and more designers seem to be taking on locally-focused and/or adaptive reuse works. Award shortlists today highlight not icons by recognizable names, but sensitive international works that are notable for their process as much as their product.

The common image of the architect may be of one obsessed with ego and newness, but practice today doesn't bear that out as much as it used to. This week's news touched on issues of reduction, reuse, and a radical rethink what architecture is in the 21st century. 

Iconic Columns in Modern Brazilian Architecture

06:00 - 24 November, 2018
Iconic Columns in Modern Brazilian Architecture, © Joana França. Image Palácio da Alvorada
© Joana França. Image Palácio da Alvorada

Of Le Corbusier's five points of modern architecture (the ribbon window, free design of the façade and ground plan, a roof garden, and pilotis), pilotis are perhaps the most used element in Brazilian modern architecture.

Prefabricated Public Schools: 7 Brazilian Projects in Plan and Section

05:00 - 22 November, 2018
Telemaco State School Melges / UNA Arquitetos. Image © Nelson Kon
Telemaco State School Melges / UNA Arquitetos. Image © Nelson Kon

Great school design is more than just a good piece of architecture. Particularly in vulnerable areas with poor public infrastructure, schools symbolize the role of the state and education as a transforming agent for social improvement. They can also become areas for community life, sports, courses, among other uses. Unfortunately, these projects do not always receive the attention they deserve. 

Schools require diverse and complex programs and flows, therefore, developing an educational project is one of the greatest challenges for architects. Due to the economy, rationalization, and speed of work, Brazil's largest portion of school projects are designed from prefabricated concrete elements with rigid modulations and, in rare cases, steel. But what may seem to limit at first, can actually become an exercise in structural creativity. 

In an attempt to elucidate the systems used to materialize these projects, we've selected a compilation of seven prefabricated schools in plan and section to create incredible spaces for learning. 

Smart Homes That Use Domotics To Improve Quality of Life

04:00 - 22 November, 2018
© Paul Finkel
© Paul Finkel

Home automation, or Domotics, is a set of technologies applied to a residence to control lighting, climate, entertainment systems, and appliances. Its systems allow for efficient management of energy consumption, security, accessibility, and the general comfort of the building, becoming an important issue to consider when designing, building, and living.

Domotic systems are based on the collection of data by sensors, which are then processed to issue precise orders to the executors, varying the environmental quality of each enclosure according to the needs of the user. The pace of current life and the technological advances we have experienced in recent years have led to new ways of living, motivating the design of homes and more human, multifunctional and flexible buildings. What was once a luxury is now a feasible and effective solution for all types of projects.

In this article, we've compiled a collection of smart homes where domotics have been used.

© Kingkien © Beer Singnoi © Kingkien © Günther Richard Wett + 25

Kengo Kuma and FGMF's Japan House Sao Paulo Through the Lens of FLAGRANTE

05:00 - 21 November, 2018
Kengo Kuma and FGMF's Japan House Sao Paulo Through the Lens of FLAGRANTE, © FLAGRANTE
© FLAGRANTE

Architect and photographer Romullo Fontenelle of FLAGRANTE studio shared with ArchDaily a series of photographs from the recently inaugurated Japan House Sao Paulo, a project by Kengo Kuma in partnership with the local office FGMF Arquitetos.

The global initiative by the Japanese Government aims to "create a vision of contemporary Japan." Opened May 2018, Japan House combines art, technology, and business to offer an escape to present day Japan. 

© FLAGRANTE © FLAGRANTE © FLAGRANTE © FLAGRANTE + 34

Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't

09:30 - 20 November, 2018
Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't, Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image
Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Was Modernism Really International? A New History Says No."

I taught architectural history in two schools of architecture during the 1980s and 1990s. Back then it was common for students to get a full three-semester course that began with Antiquity and ended with Modernism, with a nod to later twentieth-century architecture. My text for the middle section was Spiro Kostof’s magisterial History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals. With many centuries to cover, he spent very little effort in dealing with the twentieth century. In the last third of the course, students read texts such as Towards a New Architecture by Le Corbusier and Reyner Banham’s Theory and Design in the First Machine Age. My colleagues and I felt that we offered students a pluralistic and comprehensive review of key developments in the history of the built environment.

Villa Tugendhat / Mies van der Rohe. Image © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Thomas Lewandovski + 15

The Workplace Paradox: Join the IE School of Architecture and Design's Master Class

03:00 - 19 November, 2018
The Workplace Paradox: Join the IE School of Architecture and Design's Master Class

At IE School of Architecture and Design, we know that the world of work is changing so fast that we cannot always keep up. Industry disruptors, such as emerging technologies, are unsettling the setup of the traditional office. Workforce demands, the ongoing talent war, and the threat of job replacement by AI all contribute to a workforce under tremendous pressure, creating new dynamics at work.

Johnston Marklee's Menil Institute is a Quiet Triumph for a Quiet Art

14:00 - 18 November, 2018
Johnston Marklee's Menil Institute is a Quiet Triumph for a Quiet Art, The Menil Drawing Institute / Johnston Marklee. Image © Courtesy Richard Barnes/ the Menil Collection, Houston
The Menil Drawing Institute / Johnston Marklee. Image © Courtesy Richard Barnes/ the Menil Collection, Houston

Johnston Marklee has rapidly become one of the US’ most exciting practices. After years of completing sensitive and complex domestic-scaled works in Los Angeles, the office vaulted to prominence after being selected to curate Chicago’s 2017 architecture biennial. Since then they’ve completed and embarked on numerous significant projects - none more so than the Menil Drawing Institute.

15 Incredible Architectural Works in the Mountains

12:00 - 18 November, 2018
15 Incredible Architectural Works in the Mountains, © Adolf Bereuter
© Adolf Bereuter

© Felipe Camus © Anze Cokl © inexhibit.com © Thomas Jantscher + 16

The mountains—one of the contexts that almost every architect would like to build in at least once. And yet even though it's an attractive setting, the associated challenges, including, but not limited to the sheer remoteness of mountain regions and their distance from basic services, make building in the mountains particularly demanding.

We've compiled a selection of 15 incredible works of architecture that maximize the breathtaking surroundings found in mountainous areas, featuring photographs from Felipe Camus, Janez Martincic, and Anze Cokl.

Opinion: A Plea for Architectural History

09:30 - 16 November, 2018
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Quibik PD. ImageAn elevation of the entire Acropolis as seen from the west; while the Parthenon dominates the scene, it is nonetheless only part of a greater composition. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user Quibik (Public Domain)
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Quibik PD. ImageAn elevation of the entire Acropolis as seen from the west; while the Parthenon dominates the scene, it is nonetheless only part of a greater composition. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user Quibik (Public Domain)

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Opinion: We Can't Go on Teaching the Same History of Architecture as Before."

Architectural students of my generation—the last of the baby boomers, starting college in Europe or in the Americas in the late 1970s—had many good reasons to cherish architectural history. Everyone seemed to agree at the time that the Modernist project was conspicuously failing. Late Modernist monsters were then wreaking havoc on cities and lands around the world, and the most immediate, knee-jerk reaction against what many then saw as an ongoing catastrophe was to try and bring back all that 20th-century high Modernism had kicked out of design culture: history, for a start. I drew my first Doric capital, circa 1979, in a design studio, not in a history class (and my tutor immediately ordered me to scrape it, which I did).

8 Mexican Projects That Use Bamboo

05:00 - 16 November, 2018
8 Mexican Projects That Use Bamboo, Pórtico Palmeto Building / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual. Image © Leo Espinosa
Pórtico Palmeto Building / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual. Image © Leo Espinosa

In 4 Days, 100 Volunteers Used Mud and Reeds To Build This Community Center in Mexico. Image © Pedro Bravo, Sofía Hernández, Francisco Martínez Cafetería Rural Comunitaria Tosepan Kajfen / Proyecto cafeína + Komoni. Image © Patrick López Rural House in Puebla / Comunal Taller de Arquitectura. Image © Onnis Luque Sport City Oaxaca / Rootstudio + Arquitectos Artesanos. Image © Angel Ivan Valdivia Salazar + 9

Mexico is a country known globally for its traditional and contemporary architectural elements. The construction techniques characteristic of each region and the use of materials according to thermic, economic, or aesthetic needs result in unique spaces.

Bamboo as a constructive or decorative element, coating, facade, or roof has proven its superiority over materials such as plastic and steel.

While it is true that research on this material has advanced significantly in recent years, we know that there is still much to learn. Many architects are seeking knowledge from the past to apply to their current techniques. Below, we've selected a list of 8 Mexican projects that explore the use of bamboo in the hands of architects and artisans.

What Burning Man can Teach Architecture about Participatory Design

09:30 - 15 November, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Architecture as a profession today struggles with questions of relevance, with core questions surrounding the issue of whether it can create cultural vibrancy and meaning for the diverse world it serves. Within our own design community, we tend to give a lot of sway to an “exclusive tier” of architects who provide leadership and vision. While this leadership is critically important to the profession, it only corresponds to 2% of what gets built. Take it from Frank Gehry, whose 2014 comment still rings in our ears: “98% of everything that is built and designed today is pure sh*t. There is no sense of design, no respect for humanity."

If we embrace the importance and unique value of all things built on a wider range, we need to ask ourselves: how have we served and rewarded our peers responsible for creating this other 98%?  Where should we set the bar for the emotional-artistic qualities of mainstream architecture?

How Inverted King Post Trusses Allow for Large, Elegant Open Spaces

04:00 - 15 November, 2018
SEBRAE Headquarters / gruposp + Luciano Margotto. Image © Nelson Kon
SEBRAE Headquarters / gruposp + Luciano Margotto. Image © Nelson Kon

Inverted king post trusses are made of steel bars and cables used to reduce bending, deformation, and a trusses’ height. In other words, they are a collection of continuous beams (steel or wood) and steel cables that are positioned under the beam, supported by an upright king post. Although slender, they are suited for large spans and have small sections.

Grid House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Alexandre Schneider Grid House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Alexandre Schneider SEBRAE Headquarters / gruposp + Luciano Margotto. Image © Nelson Kon Grid House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Alexandre Schneider + 17

10 Years Post-Recession, a Resilient Generation Makes Practice Work for Them

09:30 - 14 November, 2018
10 Years Post-Recession, a Resilient Generation Makes Practice Work for Them, Courtesy of Atelier Cho, via CommonEdge. ImageAtelier Cho Thompson designed the offices for Food Corps, a Portland, Oregon non-profit.
Courtesy of Atelier Cho, via CommonEdge. ImageAtelier Cho Thompson designed the offices for Food Corps, a Portland, Oregon non-profit.

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "The Kids are Alright."

Economics and technology affect every profession. But since World War II perhaps no profession has experienced more technological change than architecture. These shifts occurred, paradoxically, within a well-established professional model of personal development: The guild structure of learning in the academy, then becoming professional via internship leading to licensure, has been the structure of practice for almost two centuries.

Once upon a time manual drafting with graphite or ink was applied by white males, and a single sheet master was reproduced with typed specifications added, and buildings were constructed.

That world no longer exists.  

Take Control of the Stages of Construction: 4 Ways To Ease the Process

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Take Control of Technology in Construction with Trimble Small Contractor Solutions

In the planning and construction of buildings and landscapes, it’s important to recognize the strong correlation between design and construction during the different stages of a project. In fact, these stages can best be viewed as an integrated process where one won’t work without the other.

To fully understand how these stages work together, let’s break it down. Simply put, architecture design is the process of creating the layout of a construction project. It’s usually presented through detailed plans, drawings, and specifications. On the other hand, construction planning is a process of identifying steps and resources required to turn those designs into physical reality.

Take Control of Technology in Construction with Trimble Small Contractor Solutions Contractor WorkZone business tool and mobile app by Trimble Contractor WorkZone simplifies on-site project management for the construction industry Create digital punch lists and complete projects faster with Defects Pro + 8

The Cynical Optimism of Living Architecture

09:30 - 13 November, 2018
Dune House / JVA. Image © Nils Petter Dale
Dune House / JVA. Image © Nils Petter Dale

Alain de Botton’s Living Architecture project - a joyful, democratically-minded concept to share quality architecture in the UK - was borne out of personal crisis. The Swiss-born philosopher and author gained fame in both popular and architectural circles following the release of his book, "The Architecture of Happiness."

The book was immediately successful (movie buffs may recall its brief cameo in the 2009 film 500 Days of Summer), but the response unsettled Botton. “...However pleasing it is two write a book about an issue one feels passionately about," he explained to Assemble Papers, "the truth is that - a few exceptions aside - books don’t change anything. I realized that if I cared so much about architecture, writing was a coward’s way out; the real challenge was to build.”

© Edmund Sumner. ImageBalancing Barn / MVRDV Life House / John Pawson . Image © Gilbert McCarragher A House for Essex / FAT & Grayson Perry. Image © Gilbert McCarragher Secular Retreat / Peter Zumthor. Image Courtesy of Peter Zumthor, Living Architecture + 31

Making Real-Time Rendering Less Daunting: Unreal Engine Online Learning

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When you see new software that can speed up your workflow, it’s fun to imagine what you can do with it. But in reality, many of us don’t want to be among the first to try it out, especially if documentation is lacking. No one wants to spend countless hours fighting with mysterious features only to go back to the old workflow because you just need to get things done.

Maybe you’ve been thinking about trying out photoreal real-time rendering for your workflow, but you’re concerned that that on-ramp is too steep. Real-time rendering requires you to import your CAD scene into a game engine, and anytime you import to a new piece of software, there are going to be issues to solve. If you have to figure it out on your own, it’s going to be a long, hard road.

Natural Light and Ventilation: 17 Remarkable Courtyards

12:00 - 11 November, 2018
Natural Light and Ventilation: 17 Remarkable Courtyards, © Quang Dam
© Quang Dam

© Yoon Joonhwan © Erieta Attali © Nguyen Tien Thanh © Pablo Blanco + 17

This week we present a selection of 17 excellent images of interior courtyards. These spaces bring many advantages to a design such as increased natural light and improved ventilation conditions, while providing occupants with direct access to the outside and to nature. Below is a selection of images from prominent photographers such as Quang Dam, Fran Parente, and Pablo Blanco.

This Week in Architecture: Master's Plans and Masterplans

07:00 - 10 November, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Master's Plans and Masterplans, Rendering of BIG’s Waste-to-Energy Plant. Image Courtesy of BIG.
Rendering of BIG’s Waste-to-Energy Plant. Image Courtesy of BIG.

 

JP Morgan Chase announced this week that they had hired Foster + Partners to design their new global headquarters in New York. The project, located in midtown Manhattan, will replace the existing 1960s SOM design for the US investment bank.

This is not the first time Foster + Partners have been called in to handle a corporate headquarters project: the office is also responsible for the designs of the nearby Hearst Tower, Apple’s Campus in Silicon Valley, and the Stirling Prize-winning Bloomberg HQ in London.

ZHA's Design © Flying Architecture Philip Johnson on the cover of Time Magazine Bloomberg HQ. Image © Nigel Young Courtesy of Habitat Unit. Gruen designated highly specified uses of space in his plan for Tehran. + 7

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