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35 Fireplaces that Spark Architectural Interest

12:00 - 7 October, 2018
35 Fireplaces that Spark Architectural Interest, © Weiqi Jin
© Weiqi Jin

© Ralph Feiner © Adam Gibson © Lars Petter Pettersen © Thomas Heimann + 36

From the beginning of time, human beings have gathered around the fire. The first settlements and huts included in their interior a small bonfire to cook and maintain the heat of its inhabitants. This tradition has continued to the present, and chimneys and fireplaces have developed into the most varied designs and forms, providing possibilities both inside and outside a home.

To give you ideas for materials, structures, and spatial configurations, we present 35 remarkable meeting places around the fire.

Why is CDMX the 2018 World Design Capital?

08:00 - 7 October, 2018
Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez
Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez

Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez + 22

At first sight, when approaching CDMX from the sky, is overwhelming. A sea of buildings indicates an arrival to the fifth most populated capital in the world. The size of the city, makes it difficult to recognize its limits, so it is inevitable to use urban and suburban landmarks such as the Zócalo square (downtown), Tamayo Museum in Chapultepec Park (West), University City, the Frida Kahlo Museum (Coyoacán), and Ciudad Satélite (north exit), to orient yourself.

Located in a strategic geographical position within the traditional routes of design, the city benefits from the connections and close interactions with North America and Europe. Fortunately, these external tendencies are refined within the "local" filter; the vast history and tradition of indigenous Mexican cultures permeate foreign influences making them unique creations, with a marked interest in native materials and working techniques.

Architectural Intervention: Transforming Venice’s Historic Structures to Fit Contemporary Needs

07:00 - 7 October, 2018
Architectural Intervention: Transforming Venice’s Historic Structures to Fit Contemporary Needs, via OMA
via OMA

The history of Venice’s architecture, as seen today, is a semblance of styles centuries old. A destination rich in culture, many of Venice’s existing buildings, from homes alongside the thin interior canals to the grand domed churches of Palladio, have remained stagnant in their overall design and layout since the 16th century. Once a hub of Byzantine and European trade, the city now thrives on a steady stream of tourism and a foundational group of local residents.

The structures that make up the city’s compact matrix, once integral to its function as a commercial empire, have come to take on new functions through architectural intervention; notably, architects such as Carlo Scarpa, OMA, and Tadao Ando have had a large hand in this process.

via OMA © Luca Girardini via OMA © Bruno Vanbesien + 15

Designing for Children: How Adult Decisions Shape Young Minds

06:00 - 7 October, 2018
Designing for Children: How Adult Decisions Shape Young Minds, Courtesy MAD Architects. Image
Courtesy MAD Architects. Image

The tale began with a simple idea - a toy that every child, regardless of age and ability, can play, dream, and learn with. But things turned out less than simple. Fights, lawsuits, and even a death all mark the road it took to make a now-ubiquitous toy a reality. The object in question? Lego.  

It’s tales such as this one that Alexandra Lange explores in her new book, The Design of Childhood: How the Material World Shapes Independent Kids. Some may scoff at the seemingly trivial subject matter. Surely children, with their boundless imaginations and appetite for play, can discover ways to find fun in anything.

This Week in Architecture: Visions from the Future

09:30 - 5 October, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Visions from the Future

Life in Space

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Atelier Deshaus' Transforms Shanghai's Riverfront in 3 Cultural Projects

06:30 - 5 October, 2018
Atelier Deshaus' Transforms Shanghai's Riverfront in 3 Cultural Projects, Long Museum West Bund / Atelier Deshaus. Image © Laurian Ghintiou
Long Museum West Bund / Atelier Deshaus. Image © Laurian Ghintiou

In a creative scene that is already bursting with talent and innovation, Atelier Deshaus' works in China stand out. Their projects, often renovations of existing spaces, do not follow particular rules of style set by others or even themselves. Yet they are united  in their subtle and enigmatic take on the experience of space in the ever-changing urban environments in China. 

© Laurian Ghintiou Long Museum West Bund / Atelier Deshaus. Image © Laurian Ghintiou Shanghai Modern Art Museum / Atelier Deshaus. Image © Laurian Ghintiou Renovation of 80,000-ton silos on Minsheng Wharf / Atelier Deshaus. Image © Laurian Ghintiou + 29

The Sims Lend Aspiring Architects a Hand at World-Building

05:00 - 5 October, 2018
The Sims Lend Aspiring Architects a Hand at World-Building, Some gamers work diligently to recreate historically-accurate structures or design their own renditions.
Some gamers work diligently to recreate historically-accurate structures or design their own renditions.

Avid gamers and casual observers alike have probably heard of The Sims, a life simulation video game and one of Electronic Arts' (EA) most popular franchises. The Sims, which has undergone multiple iterations and expanded its virtual universe many times over the past decade, allows players to dream and control elaborate stories for their Sims. This "virtual dollhouse," as The Sims creator Will Wright describes, also lends players the ability to endlessly customize and construct their own houses and cities for their Sims–a feature that has allowed many gamers to interact more closely with the real world of architecture.

Airports: Examples in Plan & Section

04:00 - 5 October, 2018
Airports: Examples in Plan & Section, © Fabián Dejtiar
© Fabián Dejtiar

Airports require architectural solutions that not only respond to the efficiency of their spaces and circulations - both operational and passenger - but also to their connection with other transport systems and terminals.

Take a look at 10 airports/terminals and their plans and section below.

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China's Mega Industrial Regeneration Project has Lessons for the World

03:30 - 5 October, 2018
China's Mega Industrial Regeneration Project has Lessons for the World, Courtesy of CCTN Design
Courtesy of CCTN Design

Across the world, developed cities are rebelling against heavy industry. While some reasons vary depending on local circumstances, a common global drive towards clean energy, and the shifting of developed economies towards financial services, automation, and the gig economy, is leaving a common trace within urban centers. From Beijing to Detroit, vast wastelands of steel and concrete will stand as empty relics to the age of steel and coal.

The question of what to do with these wastelands, with defunct furnaces, railways, chimneys, and lakes, may be one of the major urban questions facing generations of architects to come. What can be done when the impracticality of industrial complexes, and the precious land they needlessly occupy, collides with the embodied energy, memories, and histories which few would wish to lose?

Courtesy of CCTN Design Courtesy of CCTN Design Courtesy of CCTN Design Courtesy of CCTN Design + 20

Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole: How Architecture's Enfant Terrible Changed Design Forever

09:30 - 4 October, 2018
Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole: How Architecture's Enfant Terrible Changed Design Forever

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole."

Robert Venturi (1925-2018) was the most influential American architect of the last century, though not primarily for his built work, or because of his stature as a designer. He will never stand beside Wright, or Kahn, or even Gehry in that regard. Between 1965 and 1985 he and his collaborator, Denise Scott Brown, changed the way all architects look at buildings, cities, and landscapes, much in the way that Marshall McLuhan, Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol changed our view of art, media, and popular culture during the same period.

I worked with Bob Venturi during my apprenticeship in the 1970s; I also grew up with his books, buildings and paternal influence. He and my father were one year apart; Denise is the same age as my mother.

30 Projects Explained Through Architectural Gifs

04:00 - 4 October, 2018

In order to explain projects and design decisions properly, architects must use often rely on creative representation techniques instead of words. It’s part of the job. The quality of drawings - simple, complex, or anything in between - is fundamental for the correct reception of the ideas. Digital media has enabled new ways of representation including animation and adding a new dimension in a single image: processes.

Animated gifs can provide the same amount of information in constructive terms as a section, program distribution as a diagram and main decisions as a master plan,  while at the same time showing the progress and chronology of the project.

The following 30 projects use animated gifs as a tool to represent the design process, construction details, use of layers and interior spatial sequences.

AD Classics: Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery London / Venturi Scott Brown

16:30 - 3 October, 2018
AD Classics: Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery London / Venturi Scott Brown, The Sainsbury Wing as seen from Trafalgar Square. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis
The Sainsbury Wing as seen from Trafalgar Square. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis

Venturi Scott-Brown’s National Gallery Sainsbury Wing extension (1991) was born into a precarious no-man’s land between the warring camps of neo-Modernists and traditionalists who had been tussling over the direction of Britain’s cities for much of the prior decade. The site of the extension had come to be one of the most symbolic battlefields in British architecture since a campaign to halt its redevelopment with a Hi-Tech scheme by Ahrends Burton Koralek had led to that project’s refusal at planning in 1984.

The 'Echo Façade'. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis Ground floor lobby with rustication. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis © Valentino Danilo Matteis Stairway. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis + 17

Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks

09:30 - 3 October, 2018
Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks, Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "SHoP's Chris Sharples on Urban Architecture, Digital Fabrication, and the Public Realm."

Twin brothers Chris and Bill Sharples are two of the founding partners of SHoP Architects, a New York-based firm established 20 years ago to bring together diverse expertise in designing buildings and environments that improve the quality of public life.

The firm’s style is difficult to define, but a connective thread throughout SHoP’s portfolio is a design philosophy rooted in constraints. From digital models to next-generation fabrication and delivery techniques, technology is at the center of the firm’s movement toward an iterative approach that, as Chris Sharples says, “is beginning to blur the line between architecture and manufacturing.”

Courtesy of SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects and West8 © Bruce Damonte Courtesy of SHoP Architects + 8

The Beauty of Pre-Oxidized Copper Through 8 Facades

04:00 - 3 October, 2018
The Beauty of Pre-Oxidized Copper Through 8 Facades, The Green House / K2LD Architects. Image © Jeremy San
The Green House / K2LD Architects. Image © Jeremy San

Patinated copper, also called oxidized, is a metal coat that "ages well" with excellent weathering resistance. Due to its capacity for transformation over time, when coming into contact with atmospheric conditions, the material does not require major maintenance, giving a unique aspect to the facades.

In addition to orange-colored plates, this material also gives off a blue / green appearance through a controlled chemical oxidation process. Its coloration is defined by the amount of crystals contained in the surface of the material. With the appearance of natural light, the panels display various shades and nuances of color.

"I Want to Build Lighter": Francisco Gonzalez Pulido of FGP Atelier

09:30 - 2 October, 2018
"I Want to Build Lighter": Francisco Gonzalez Pulido of FGP Atelier, Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier
Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier

After graduating from Tecnológico de Monterrey, a leading technical school in Mexico, Francisco Gonzalez Pulido worked on design-build projects for six years before leaving for the US where he earned his Master’s degree from Harvard’s GSD in 1999. The same year the architect started working with Helmut Jahn in Chicago where he stayed for 18 years – from intern to becoming the president of the company in 2012, at which point he renamed the firm into Jahn. By then he developed his own body of work there. Last year Gonzalez Pulido started FGP Atelier in his adopted home city.

Today the studio, counts a dozen of architects and is overseeing the design of a couple of high-rises in China, a baseball stadium in Mexico City, and university buildings in Monterrey, among other projects. The following interview was conducted at FGP Atelier in Chicago, during which the architect was explicit about transmitting his view: “Architecture is too rigid, too formal. It is time to break free…I want to build lighter. I want to build smarter.”

ART. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier Tecnano. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier DIABLOS. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier + 41

Kazuyo Sejima: "The Building is About the Size, But Also About the Details"

05:00 - 2 October, 2018
Kazuyo Sejima: "The Building is About the Size, But Also About the Details", Laszló Baán (left), Kazuyo Sejima, and Martha Thorne in Hay Festival. Image © Nicolás Valencia
Laszló Baán (left), Kazuyo Sejima, and Martha Thorne in Hay Festival. Image © Nicolás Valencia

Kazuyo Sejima, co-founder of the architecture firm SANAA, shared details of their upcoming project the New National Gallery – Ludwig Museum in Budapest at the Hay Festival Segovia in Spain. The 2010 Pritzker Prize winner linked the underlying premise of this project to three iconic museums: the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa (2004), the New Art Museum in New York (2007), and the Louvre Lens in France (2012).

In this conversation, Laszló Baán, General Director of the National Gallery, Budapest and Ministerial Commissioner of the Liget Budapest Project, explained the details of the 100-hectare (247-acre) masterplan at the heart of Hungary's capital city. The Liget Budapest Project will feature ten museums, including Sou Fujimoto's House of Hungarian Music, the expansion of the Budapest Zoo, and SANAA's New National Gallery for Budapest — a museum that will host 19th, 20th century, and contemporary artworks.

Hair Salons and Barbershops: Examples in Plan and Section

04:00 - 2 October, 2018
Hair Salons and Barbershops: Examples in Plan and Section, © Fabián Dejtiar
© Fabián Dejtiar

In recent years hair salons and barbershops have begun to incorporate different activities - a programmatic hybridization almost necessary in today's service economy. 

Several architects have been commissioned to propose alternatives to the standard beauty salon/barbershop to not only address an efficient configuration but stunning interior aesthetics.

Take a look at 10 barbershops and beauty salons with their plan and section.

World Architecture Day 2018: Our Editors Celebrate with their Favorite Stories and Projects

16:15 - 1 October, 2018
World Architecture Day 2018: Our Editors Celebrate with their Favorite Stories and Projects, 100 Classrooms for Refugee Children / Emergency Architecture & Human Rights. Image © Martina Rubino
100 Classrooms for Refugee Children / Emergency Architecture & Human Rights. Image © Martina Rubino

Created by the Union International des Architects (UIA) in 2005, World Architecture Day is celebrated on the first Monday of October, aiming to highlight and remind the world of the architecture's collective responsibility in designing the world's future cities and settlements. To celebrate, ArchDaily's editors have chosen stories from the year so far that have interested, excited, or inspired them. Read on to see the stories.

Words on the Street: Art, Architecture, and the Public Protest

09:30 - 1 October, 2018
Words on the Street: Art, Architecture, and the Public Protest, Barricades in the streets of Bordeaux during the May 1968 protests in France. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia
Barricades in the streets of Bordeaux during the May 1968 protests in France. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia

This article was originally published as "What Marchers Today Can Learn from the May 1968 Protests in Paris" on CommonEdge in May 2018. In the 50 years since the historic and worldwide protests of 1968, much has changed. But today's political climate seems equally volatile, with seismic changes threatening social and political establishments across the globe. Lessons from the past are, to borrow the phrase of the moment, more relevant than ever.

American friends recently sent an email: “What’s going on with the French political system? Why all the strikes? What about the endless protest marches? We’d like to visit you in Paris, but we’re a little wary.”

Architectural Models of Constructive Details: Examples of Representation and Utility

05:00 - 1 October, 2018
Architectural Models of Constructive Details: Examples of Representation and Utility, <a href='https://www.plataformaarquitectura.cl/cl/884151/por-que-las-maquetas-son-fundamentales-para-hacer-realidad-los-proyectos-en-bambu'>The models are fundamental to realize these bamboo projects</a>. Image © Eduardo Souza
The models are fundamental to realize these bamboo projects. Image © Eduardo Souza

It's not easy to find theory in the implementation of architectural models: a practical model that allows you to analyze and showcase the organization of material elements according to a particular process. They also allow you to detect and modify the key elements of a project while also addressing the project's executive procedures. 

Together with architectonic construction details, the development of the constructive facets is pushed to the background up until the ultimate steps of the design process, but this is also when we identify what is appropriate for a certain stage in the process in order to facilitate a seamless execution.

In the search to bring ourselves closer to the presentation and utility of architectural models, we invite you to take a look at a series of examples:

The Tools You Need to Easily Meet BIM Mandates

Sponsored Article
The Tools You Need to Easily Meet BIM Mandates, The Ritterman Building. Image courtesy of bpr architects.
The Ritterman Building. Image courtesy of bpr architects.

For bpr architects, BIM Level 2 is becoming business as usual. This medium-sized, employee-owned firm based in the UK focuses on how good design can add value to a client’s vision. Led by Directors Paul Beaty-Pownall and Steve Cowell, the firm specializes in three core sectors: higher education, rail stations, and regeneration.

Mood Changers: Why Lighting is The Most Important Design Feature

Sponsored Article
Mood Changers: Why Lighting is The Most Important Design Feature, Courtesy of Alcon Lighting
Courtesy of Alcon Lighting

Walk into a room bathed in cozy, inviting light and you’ll feel instantly at ease. Walk into the same room buzzing with harsh fluorescents, and your teeth may start to grind.

Why?

In 2014, a Journal of Consumer Psychology study found that the more intense the lighting, the more affected and intense the participants’ emotions were — both positive and negative.

The study included six experiments that examined the link between emotion and ambient brightness. Feelings of warmth increased when participants were exposed to bright light with hints of reddish hues. A sensation of angst increased when bluer light dominated.

And the brighter the light, the more intense the participants’ emotions became. Both the intensity and the color of the light affected people’s moods. 

How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 16 Notable Examples

12:00 - 30 September, 2018
How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 16 Notable Examples, © Lukas Pelech
© Lukas Pelech

Cortesía de MAP Cortesía de Project.DWG + LOOS.FM Cortesía de Wang Shu, Amateur Architecture Studio © Quang Tran + 33

With the aim of supporting architects to become active agents of sustainable design, this week we present a selection of facades that incorporate different recycled materials. Beyond the typical uses of plastic and glass, in this article, you will find innovative materials such as mattress springs, ice cream containers, plastic chairs, and recycled waste from agricultural and industrial products. A look at 16 remarkable projects using recycled materials to create an attractive facade.

"I Don't Really See AI as A Threat": Imdat As on Artificial Intelligence in Architecture

09:30 - 30 September, 2018
"I Don't Really See AI as A Threat": Imdat As on Artificial Intelligence in Architecture, Joris Laarman for MX3D
Joris Laarman for MX3D

Is Artificial Intelligence (AI) the doom of the architecture profession and design services (as some warn) or a way to improve the overall design quality of the built environment, expanding and extending design services in ways yet to be explored? I sat down with my University of Hartford colleague Imdat As. Dr. As is an architect with an expertise in digital design who is an assistant professor of architecture and the co-founder of Arcbazar.com, a crowd-sourced design site. His current research on AI and its impact on architectural design and practice is funded by the US Department of Defense. Recently we sat down and talked about how this emerging technology might change design and practice as we now know it—and if so, would that be such a bad thing?

This article was originally published as "Doom or Bloom: What Will Artificial Intelligence Mean for Architecture?" on CommonEdge. It has been slightly abridged for publication on this platform; the full interview can be read on CommonEdge here.

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