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Win a Free Ticket to the 2018 World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam

03:30 - 31 October, 2018
Win a Free Ticket to the 2018 World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam, King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre by Zaha Hadid Architects shortlisted for "Higher Education and Research - Completed Buildings"
King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre by Zaha Hadid Architects shortlisted for "Higher Education and Research - Completed Buildings"

The World Architecture Festival is regarded as one of the most wide-ranging and influential architectural events. This year's event will take place in Amsterdam at the RAI Exhibition and Convention Centre from November 28-30. Bringing global voices in architecture, this year's speakers include keynote presenter Rem Koolhaas, Jeanne Gang, David Adjaye, and Li Xiaodong. This year, five lucky ArchDaily readers can win a standard pass to the World Architecture Festival 2018 (worth €1525). Enter the prize draw here.

10 Years of WAF's World Building of the Year

09:00 - 30 October, 2018
Courtesy of Grafton Architects. ImageUniversita Luigi Bocconi / Grafton Architects  Save this picture! via Grafton Architects via Grafton Architects
Courtesy of Grafton Architects. ImageUniversita Luigi Bocconi / Grafton Architects Save this picture! via Grafton Architects via Grafton Architects

 

To Design for the Elderly, Don't Look to the Past

07:00 - 30 October, 2018
To Design for the Elderly, Don't Look to the Past, Dominique Coulon & associés. Image © Eugeni Pons
Dominique Coulon & associés. Image © Eugeni Pons

When the world undergoes major changes (be it social, economic, technological, or political), the world of architecture needs to adapt alongside. Changes in government policy, for example, can bring about new opportunities for design to thrive, such as the influx of high-quality social housing currently being designed throughout London. Technological advances are easier to notice, but societal changes have just as much impact upon the architecture industry and the buildings we design.

Dominique Coulon & associés. Image © Eugeni Pons The Architect / LEVS architecten. Image © Marcel van der Burg, via Matthew Usher  Senior Center of Guangxi / Atelier Alter. Image Courtesy of Atelier Alter, via Matthew Usher Pilgrim Gardens / PRP . Image © Tim Crocker, via Matthew Usher + 33

Architecture in Black: A Selection of The Best Dark Interiors

04:00 - 30 October, 2018
Architecture in Black: A Selection of The Best Dark Interiors   , © Daici Ano
© Daici Ano

The use of light and shadow in architecture can have several nuances. The traditional Japanese culture stands out for working with spaces of dim light, kind of dull. On the other hand, modern architecture and minimalism work along with illuminating spaces through the use of white spaces and reflection of light as a recurring resource.

Even so, black, dark spaces and minimalism also converse in the same language that provides new possibilities for lighting design and use of new materials. We now present you a selection of the best contemporary interior spaces that use black as the protagonist element, generating introspective but dramatic environments at the same time.

Spotlight: SANAA

15:00 - 29 October, 2018
Spotlight: SANAA, Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman
Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman

Founded in 1995 by architects Kazuyo Sejima (born 29 October 1956) and Ryue Nishizawa (born 7 February 1966), SANAA is world-renowned for its white, light buildings grounded in the architects’ Japanese cultural origins. Despite the white exteriors, their architecture is far from modernist; the constant incorporation of ambiguity and doubt in SANAA’s buildings is refreshing and playful, taking the reflective properties of glass and brightness of white to a new level.

Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman Louvre Lens / SANAA. Image © Julien Lanoo Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art / SANAA. Image © Iwan Baan New Museum / SANAA. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 12

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The Unlikely Life, Death and Rebirth of the Hastings Pier

09:30 - 29 October, 2018
The Unlikely Life, Death and Rebirth of the Hastings Pier, Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou
Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou

The story of the Hastings Pier is an improbable one. Located in Hastings - a stone's throw away from the battlefield that defined English history - the pier was first opened to the promenading public in 1872. For decades the structure, an exuberant array of Victorian-era decoration, entertained seaside crowds but by the new millennium had fallen out of disrepair. In 2008 the pier was closed - a closure that became seemingly irreversible when, two years later, it burnt down.

Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou Hastings Pier / dRMM. Image © Laurian Ghinitiou + 21

Fiber Cement Facades in Architecture: 9 Notable Examples

05:00 - 29 October, 2018
Fiber Cement Facades in Architecture: 9 Notable Examples, Lighthouse / Room11 Architects. Image © Benjamin Hosking
Lighthouse / Room11 Architects. Image © Benjamin Hosking

Interested in building light and modular facades with a rustic and monolithic appearance?

Composed of cement, cellulose, and mineral materials, fiber cement allows us to clad walls in a light, non-combustible, and rain-resistant way, generating facades with different textures, colors, and tones. Its panels are easily manageable, perforable, and can configure ventilated facades when installed with a certain separation between the rear wall. Check after the break for 9 projects that have cleverly used fiber cement as the primary material in facades.

24 Housing Units / Zanon + Bourbon Architects. Image © Olivier Dancy Casa Hoffstad / Knut Hjeltnes. Image © Inger Marie Grini Villa GK / CORE Architects. Image © Alexander Bogorodskiy Casa GZ / Studio Cáceres Lazo. Image © Pablo Casals Aguirre + 25

Common Ruins

Sponsored Article
Common Ruins, YAC
YAC

YAC - Young Architects Competitions and Mothe Chandeniers launched “Common Ruins”, a competition of ideas aiming to breath a new life into an astonishing castle in France. A cash prize of € 20,000 will be awarded to winners selected by a well-renowned jury made of, among the others, Anish Kapoor, Rudy Ricciotti, Edoardo Tresoldi, Dagur Eggertsson, Alfonso Femia, Aldo Cibic, Marco Amosso (Lombardini 22), Luca Dolmetta (LD+SR architetti).

A Selection of the World’s Best Architects

04:00 - 29 October, 2018
A Selection of the World’s Best Architects, © Ossip Van Duivenbode. ImageTianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute
© Ossip Van Duivenbode. ImageTianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute

To rank architects, or to even pretend that any list or selection would be exhaustive and/or apply to the individual tastes of every architecture lover, seems, on the surface, a pointless task. However, as we move away from looking for inspiration from merely the great masters or the handful of contemporary firms studied in academic programs, it is important to shine a light on the works that we, as ArchDaily editors, have found particularly valuable. Of the thousands of architects whose projects have been selected to be published on our site, we occasionally notice firms whose work stands out. Whether we’re drawn to their innovative approach to practice, the role they play in contributing to their local communities, or their generosity, we are eager to display their work as an example, so that others may be inspired to challenge the status quo.

The Faded Pastel Facades of Russia

12:00 - 28 October, 2018
© Maria Gonzalez
© Maria Gonzalez

© Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez + 21

During our past trips to Russia - in cities such as Moscow, Kaliningrad, Belgorod and even Grozny, the capital of the Chechen Republic - we documented the subtle pastel exteriors found in several cities around the world’s largest country. From neoclassical, to modernist and brutalist buildings, to public spaces and urban intra-structures such as metros, bridges and squares, pastel colors stand out as an essential, cohesive part of Russian identity. See a small selection of pastel-colored urban images below.

Guide for the Ultimate Mid-Century Modern Architecture Road Trip

08:00 - 28 October, 2018
Guide for the Ultimate Mid-Century Modern Architecture Road Trip, Greater Refuge Temple, Costas Machlouzarides, 1968, New York, New York, USA. Image © Darren Bradley
Greater Refuge Temple, Costas Machlouzarides, 1968, New York, New York, USA. Image © Darren Bradley

The following excerpt from Sam Lubell's Mid-Century Modern Architecture Travel Guide: East Coast USA—with excellent photos by Darren Bradley—provides an introduction to the revelatory and inspiring charm of the East Coast's Mid-Century Modern masterpieces. The book includes over 250 unique projects and serves as record of one of the USA’s most important architectural movements.

Few experiences are as wedged into our psyches as the Great American Road Trip—a rite of passage chronicled by luminaries from Alexis de Tocqueville to Jack Kerouac. The Great American Mid-Century Modern Architecture Road Trip? Not famous. But that’s one of the many reasons it’s so appealing. Discovery, in this global, digital age, when few corners are mysterious, has become a rare commodity. And discovery on the East Coast of America—in the context of one of the finest collections of Modern design in the world—is that much sweeter.

Reclaiming Polish Brutalism: Discover the Emblems of Communism

07:00 - 28 October, 2018
Reclaiming Polish Brutalism: Discover the Emblems of Communism, Falowiec / Gdańsk. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia
Falowiec / Gdańsk. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia

To strip a city of its architecture is to erase its history altogether. Despite a widespread public distaste for Brutalism, the brutalist era in architecture often went hand in hand with political movements promising an egalitarian vision in post-Stalinist Poland. What may now be considered austere and overbearing was originally intended to be anything but; the buildings today carry both an appreciation for their legacy and the burden of unwanted memories.

In a recent article in the New York Times, writer Akash Kapur documents his visit to Poland, bringing readers into his experiences and observations of this complex response to Polish architecture. From sharing its history to short anecdotes from interviews, the piece postulates whether these relics can become alive again.

Osiedle Plac Grunwaldzki "Manhattan" / Wroclaw Falowiec / Gdańsk © Marcin Lachowicz Courtesy of Wikimedia + 10

Brazilian Houses: 15 Steel Projects in Plan and Section

08:00 - 27 October, 2018
Brazilian Houses: 15 Steel Projects in Plan and Section, Casa Claudios / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Pedro Kok
Casa Claudios / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Pedro Kok

Metallic elements have been used in architecture and civil construction for hundreds of years, either as decorative elements, coverings or even to reinforce masonry structures. However, it is only in the second half of the eighteenth century that the first bridges emerge whose structure was entirely made of cast iron. A century later, iron was replaced by a more resistant and malleable alloy, still used today in architecture: steel.

Denser than concrete, the strength of steel subverts its weight and provides greater stiffness with less material - allowing for lighter and thinner structures than those made from other materials, such as wood or concrete. It is by no means the most used material in residential architecture, however, its use has made it possible to construct some interesting - and beautiful - examples of contemporary houses:

This Week in Architecture: What Does Modernism Mean Today?

09:30 - 26 October, 2018
Metropol Parasol / Jürgen Mayer. Image © Nikkol Rot for Holcim
Metropol Parasol / Jürgen Mayer. Image © Nikkol Rot for Holcim

It’s easy to feel jaded about modernism. What started as a radically rational and analytical approach to design - one not beholden to the architectural traditions of place or history - has become a smokescreen behind which designers and developers alike can hide. The language of logic (genuine or not) is a shield against criticism and satisfies questions about the bottom line. The border between minimalism and a value-engineered bare minimum has been blurred to the point of invisibility.

Heatherwick Studio's Massive Coal Drops Yard Project Opens in London

13:00 - 25 October, 2018
Heatherwick Studio's Massive Coal Drops Yard Project Opens in London, Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow
Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow

Heatherwick Studio’s Coal Drops Yard in London’s King's Cross was unveiled today ahead of the new shopping districts public opening on Friday, October 26. The studio reinvented two heritage rail buildings from the 1850s as a new shopping district while opening up the site to the public for the first time. The design extends the inner gabled roofs of Victorian coal drops to link the two viaducts together around shopping and public space.

Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow Coal Drops Yard / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Hufton + Crow + 13

How a Daily Sketch Improves Architecture

09:30 - 25 October, 2018
© Frank Harmon
© Frank Harmon

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "How the Quick Daily Drawing Puts Humanity Back Into Architecture."

Architect Frank Harmon has a discipline: he tries to do a freehand drawing every day. He doesn’t spend much time on them. About five minutes. These short spurts of depiction have the effect of catching lightning in a bottle or, as Virginia Woolf once said about the importance of writing every day, “to clap the net over the butterfly of moment.” To capture these moments you must be fast. The minute moves. Harmon’s drawings feel loose, fuzzy at the edges. You sense their five-minute duration.

Frank Harmon Frank Harmon Frank Harmon © Frank Harmon + 25

Modernist Icon Paul Rudolph's Unbuilt LOMEX Completed in New Renderings

07:40 - 23 October, 2018
Modernist Icon Paul Rudolph's Unbuilt LOMEX Completed in New Renderings, Plaza by the Williamsburg bridge. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen
Plaza by the Williamsburg bridge. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen

Paul Rudolph, despite vaulting to international success in the early 1940s and 50s for his Brutalist structures, saw an abrupt end to the popularity of his signature style as postmodernism gained prominence. As tastes shifted to different fare, so too did Rudolph's approach - leaving a number of  his unbuilt proposals to gather dust. 

No longer. 

Middle path through the lowrises. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen Paul Rudolph's original vision of LOMEX. Image Paul Rudolph's original vision of LOMEX. Image View from terrace in the high-rises. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen + 14

Can Future Cities be Timber Cities? Google’s Sidewalk Labs Asks the Experts

05:00 - 23 October, 2018
Can Future Cities be Timber Cities? Google’s Sidewalk Labs Asks the Experts, Courtesy of MGA. ImageMGA reenvisioned the Empire State Building in mass timber construction
Courtesy of MGA. ImageMGA reenvisioned the Empire State Building in mass timber construction

Steel and concrete facades have dominated contemporary cityscapes for generations, but as pressures from climate change pose new challenges for design and construction industries, some firms are turning to mass timber as the construction material of the future. But could it be used for structures as complex as skyscrapers? 

Why Architects Need to Get Dirty to Save the World

09:30 - 22 October, 2018
Courtesy of the Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller
Courtesy of the Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Why Architects Need to Get Dirty to Save the World."

Of all the terrarium-like experiments included in Lydia Kallipoliti’s The Architecture of Closed Worlds: Or, What Is the Power of Shit? (Lars Müller/Storefront for Art and Architecture), Biosphere 2 is the most infamous. A steel-and-glass structure baking in the Arizona desert, it represents the hope and hubris of re-creating Earth on Earth. The project was launched by an alternative living group with a taste for theater, and tanked by disastrous management by Steve Bannon (yes, him). As such, it illustrates the risky arc that courses through Kallipoliti’s 300-page volume—visions of utopia bending toward ultimate failure.

The Best Materials for Architectural Models

05:00 - 22 October, 2018
The Best Materials for Architectural Models, Casa no Pomar / ŠÉPKA ARCHITEKTI
Casa no Pomar / ŠÉPKA ARCHITEKTI

For centuries, physical modeling has been a staple of architectural education and practice. Allowing the designer and client to explore a scheme in plan, elevation, and perspective all at once, the physical model aims to simulate the spatial relationship between volumes and to understand constructive systems. 

Even in an age of ultra-high quality rendering, and virtual reality, physical material models represent a beloved, tried and tested method of conveying ideas both during the design process and at presentation stage. Whether through a rapid, five-minute volumetric test of paper models, or a carefully sculpted timber construction detail, careful choice of material can greatly assist the modeling process, allowing designers to remain abstract, or test physical properties of structural systems.

The Ruins of Tijuana's Housing Crisis

04:00 - 22 October, 2018
© Mónica Arreola
© Mónica Arreola

© Mónica Arreola © Mónica Arreola © Mónica Arreola © Mónica Arreola + 7

Tijuana is one of the most populated cities in Mexico. In 2000, the construction of collective housing boomed. This phenomenon completely transformed the limits of the city; the periphery exhibited a new appearance: a modernized future, new urban schemes, and a new lifestyle.

Best Small Chapel Architecture & Design

12:00 - 21 October, 2018
© Samuel Ludwig
© Samuel Ludwig

Cortesía de Nicolás Campodónico © Yao Li Cortesía de STUDIO associates © Davide Perbellini + 32

This week we’ve selected the best chapels previously published on our site. They reveal different ways of designing a small and sacred space. For inspiration on how to create these atmospheres, integrate different materials, and make proper use of light, we present 32 remarkable examples.

The Pride and Prejudice of Bogota's Bicentenario Park

11:00 - 21 October, 2018
The Pride and Prejudice of Bogota's Bicentenario Park, © Alejandro Arango
© Alejandro Arango

Medellin’s renaissance is one for architecture’s storybooks. After decades of mundane violence, the city today is not only (comparatively) peaceful but a world-class architectural hub. Indeed, many cite the city’s urban development as a factor in its rebirth. But Medellin’s success sometimes overshadows that of neighbouring (and capital) city, Bogota.

Experimenting with Concrete Models: More Mass Doesn't Mean Less Light

08:00 - 21 October, 2018
Experimenting with Concrete Models: More Mass Doesn't Mean Less Light, Dramatic Art Center_1. Image Courtesy of LLATAS
Dramatic Art Center_1. Image Courtesy of LLATAS

The contact between hands and models should never be lost. Going into this experience provokes silence, forcing us to think about the care that goes into concrete models. Few words are needed, as models often tell us everything we need to know through the beauty and simplicity that goes into their creation and the importance of the manual process in an architect's work. 

3N1_3. Image Courtesy of LLATAS Dramatic Art Center_4. Image Courtesy of LLATAS National Museum_4. Image Courtesy of LLATAS Monumental Venice_7. Image Courtesy of LLATAS + 48

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