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Photographer Captures Shanghai's Disappearing Streets

04:00 - 3 July, 2019
© Cody Ellingham
© Cody Ellingham

Between Shanghai’s crowded meat markets, bundles of wires, vivid neon lights, and dense smogs, lie the historic ‘Shikumen’ lane houses. Built between the end of the 19th century and World War II, these houses were inspired by French and British Colonial and Art Deco styles and the Chinese ‘Hutong’ housing style. But time for these aged ornate structures is running out, as all the Shikumen lane houses across Shanghai are being torn down.

As part of his Shanghai Streets series, photographer Cody Ellingham has set out on a mission to freeze time and capture these historic streets before they are completely demolished and forgotten.

© Cody Ellingham © Cody Ellingham © Cody Ellingham © Cody Ellingham + 20

3 Trends Inspiring New Architectural Surfaces

03:30 - 2 July, 2019
3 Trends Inspiring New Architectural Surfaces, This checkout experience gets playful and functional with a colorful combination of Wilsonart® Commercial Laminate and fingerprint-resistant Traceless™ Laminate.
This checkout experience gets playful and functional with a colorful combination of Wilsonart® Commercial Laminate and fingerprint-resistant Traceless™ Laminate.

World leading engineered surfaces manufacturer shares three trends influencing next-generation decorative surfaces

For years, interior surface designers have drawn inspiration from their environments in order to create delightful and innovative engineered surfacing materials specified in architectural spaces. From familiar and traditional to futuristic and contemporary, design inspiration can be found all around structures, elements, and styles that surround us every day.

Urban Refuges and Interspecies Seeing / Sarah Mineko Ichioka for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

08:30 - 1 July, 2019
Urban Refuges and Interspecies Seeing / Sarah Mineko Ichioka for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, Tree with QR code © Sarah Mineko Ichioka
Tree with QR code © Sarah Mineko Ichioka

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

First, let me declare my unambiguous aversion to the envisioned future in which “any room, street or shop in our city can recognize you, and autonomously respond to your presence.” Despite this, can I see any positive potentials in pervasive systems of urban surveillance and response?

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Why a Career in UX Design is Perfect for Dissatisfied Architects

05:30 - 1 July, 2019
Why a Career in UX Design is Perfect for Dissatisfied Architects, © Sentavio via Shutterstock
© Sentavio via Shutterstock

This article by Gavin Johns was originally published on Medium as "Architects, stop everything and pursue a career in UX."

As an architect turned user experience (UX) designer I have many strong opinions about both my former and my current profession. But in short, I am now enjoying greener pastures, getting the fulfillment I expected while studying architecture but the profession didn’t provide.

Many like-minded architects ask me when and why I decided to transition into software. This puts me in the unusual position of praising the initial skill-set achieved by studying architecture, while promoting departure from it. That said, I have a very abstract definition of architecture, and believe if you have the interest to pursue any other design discipline, you’ll be successful. This guide is intended for those driven and curious architects who are looking for a change.

NextOffice Blur the Boundaries of Chartaqi-Inspired Project

10:00 - 30 June, 2019
NextOffice Blur the Boundaries of Chartaqi-Inspired Project, © NextOffice
© NextOffice

Many references to historic architecture are still being used in contemporary projects. Whether it is ancient building techniques, use of material, or the relationship between architecture and nature, the past remains prominent.

Iranian architecture firm NextOffice blurred the boundaries between indoors and outdoors, and used historic Iranian architecture elements to create the contemporary Guyim Vault House.

© NextOffice © NextOffice © NextOffice © NextOffice + 16

SAGA Space Architects Design Simulated Mars Habitat in Israeli Desert

06:00 - 30 June, 2019

In the Negev Desert of Israel, SAGA Space Architects are collaborating with D-MARS to build a Mars Lab Habitat that will simulate the conditions of living in a confined space on the hazardous surface of the red planet. The laboratory structure they’ve designed is an addition to D-MARS' existing Mars simulation habitat and will be part of a larger experiment. This habitat will serve as a prototype for a longer mission scheduled for 2020.

Exterior. Image © Edi Cliff Ent Interior. Image © Edi Cliff Ent Structure. Image © Edi Cliff Ent Algae ceiling. Image © Edi Cliff Ent + 21

Ian McHarg's Legacy Spurs "Design With Nature Now" Initiative 50 Years Later

10:00 - 29 June, 2019
Ian McHarg's Legacy Spurs "Design With Nature Now" Initiative 50 Years Later, McHarg promoting his book in 1969. Image Courtesy of the Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania
McHarg promoting his book in 1969. Image Courtesy of the Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania

Fifty years have passed since the publication of influential landscape architect Ian McHarg’s book, Design With Nature in 1969. Throughout the United States, an environmental movement was taking place, into the center of which McHarg’s book was thrust. The 1970s and ‘80s were a time of much landmark legislation surrounding ecological concerns, and McHarg argued that landscape architecture alone was able to integrate all the disparate fields involved.

The Importance of Communication and Context in Enrique Sobejano's Work

08:30 - 28 June, 2019
The Importance of Communication and Context in Enrique Sobejano's Work, Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe
Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

Konigshof rendering. Image Courtesy of Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Montblanc exterior view. Image Courtesy of Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe Arvo Part Centre. Image © Roland Halbe + 41

What is Graphene and How Can It Revolutionize Architecture?

07:30 - 28 June, 2019
What is Graphene and How Can It Revolutionize Architecture?, Cortesia de The University of Manchester
Cortesia de The University of Manchester

Ever since Manchester University first isolated Graphene in 2004, it has been widely referred to by its properties as a promising material through diverse research that focuses on reaching a range of uses in the most varied industries. Graphene is known to be one of the strongest materials known to science due to its composition of a single carbon atomic layer in a hexagonal mesh. It is also one of the finest materials known to mankind, 200 times stronger than steel yet 6 times lighter. Plus, it is an excellent heat and electricity conductor, aside from its interesting light absorption qualities. When combined with other elements, including gases and metals, it can produce different new materials with highly superior properties.

Airports: Examples in Plan & Section

07:00 - 28 June, 2019
Airports: Examples in Plan & Section, © Fabián Dejtiar
© Fabián Dejtiar

Airports require architectural solutions that not only respond to the efficiency of their spaces and circulations - both operational and passenger - but also to their connection with other transport systems and terminals.

Take a look at 10 airports/terminals and their plans and section below.

Opinion: In Architecture, Silence Is Anything But Golden

05:30 - 28 June, 2019
Opinion: In Architecture, Silence Is Anything But Golden, © Weebly
© Weebly

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Architects compete, and the internet provides unlimited opportunities for competition among all who wish to offer up something for consideration. None of this is news. But there’s been a change in both the expectations and the etiquette around all of those offerings.

Earlier this month, I was asked to submit to two small competitions. I had completed successful projects that matched each competition’s focus, so I dove in. We confirmed that our entries met the criteria and deadlines; we knew the day of jury deliberations and the release date of their decision. As usual, we lost (success only comes for those willing to accept failure); also, as usual, the verdict for us and for all other runners up was silence.

New Plan Aims to Revamp Midtown Detroit, the City’s Cultural Hub

04:00 - 28 June, 2019
New Plan Aims to Revamp Midtown Detroit, the City’s Cultural Hub, © Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne
© Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne

© Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne © Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne © Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne © Agence Ter, Akoaki, rootoftwo, and Harley Etienne + 12

A team composed of international and local studios and individuals—Agence Ter, rootoftwo, Akoaki, and Harley Etienne—was recently chosen to revitalize the 83-acre area.

Over the course of the 20th century, across a series of administrations and economic contexts, Midtown Detroit grew into one of America’s largest (or densest) cultural districts, with over 12 major institutions, such as the Detroit Institute for the Arts (DIA) and the College for Creative Studies. But you wouldn’t know it, even if you were there—the nine-block, 83-acre area is a mish-mash of styles spanning Beaux Arts, Modernism, and Brutalism, and has a certain sense of placelessness. The area feels architecturally disjointed, illegible, and fails to translate the vibrancy of each institution into the broader public space.

Dong-Ping Wong on +Pool and Rendering Styles

07:00 - 27 June, 2019
© The Midnight Charette
© The Midnight Charette

The Midnight Charette is an explicit podcast about design, architecture, and the everyday. Hosted by architectural designers David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, it features a variety of creative professionals in unscripted and long-format conversations that allow for thoughtful takes and more personal discussions. Honesty and humor are used to cover a wide array of subjects: some episodes provide useful tips for designers, while others are project reviews, interviews, or simply explorations of everyday life and design. The Midnight Charette is available for free on iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, and all other podcast directories.

On this episode of The Midnight Charette podcast, hosts David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet are joined by Dong-Ping Wong, Founding Partner of FOOD to discuss the architecture design process, structuring a collaborative work environment, communicating with non-architects, starting +POOL (the world's first water-filtering floating pool), black tie personas and architectural education, rendering styles and more.

The Age of Travel is Over

05:30 - 27 June, 2019
The Age of Travel is Over, Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974 / Paul Andreu © Paul Maurer
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974 / Paul Andreu © Paul Maurer

Modernism always wanted to have it both ways: on the one hand, modernist architecture was supposed to be, in theory, the same in all places; that's one reason why modernism in architecture was also called the International Style. If all modernist buildings look the same, when you see one you have seen them all: no need for further travel. Yet throughout the 20th century modernist culture and technology enthusiastically endorsed and favored travel. In the 60s we traveled to the Moon, and civil aviation made the world smaller. In modernist culture, travel was good. It made all travelers better, happier humans. It was good to learn foreign languages and to go see distant places. High modernist travel was not only good; it was also cool. The jet setters of the 60s were the coolest citizens of the world. Even later in the 20th century the general expectation was that borderless, seamless travel would keep getting easier and more frequent. Most Europeans of my generation grew up learning two or more foreign languages, and it was not unusual until recently to be born in one country, to study in another, and find one's first job in a third one. That was seen as an opportunity, not as a deprivation.

A Town within a Town for Sadra's Civic Center

04:00 - 27 June, 2019
A Town within a Town for Sadra's Civic Center , © NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni
© NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni

The recently-formed town of Sadra, Iran, is gradually evolving into a mega-city as a result of its geographical location and architectural potential. To improve the cultural standards of the town, several cultural centers were constructed, transforming the area into a major hub for people of all ages.

Keeping in mind that a newly-built town requires an adaptable space for potential expansions, NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni architecture studio created the “Sadra Civic Center”, a town within a town built from its surrounding urban elements.

© NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni © NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni © NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni © NextOffice - Alireza Taghaboni + 23

Are There Existing Daylight Design Standards? Learn about the First European Standard

Sponsored Article
Are There Existing Daylight Design Standards? Learn about the First European Standard, Atrium Longlight in DSV Office Building
Atrium Longlight in DSV Office Building

Published at the end of 2018, the new European Standard EN 17037 deals with daylight in buildings. It is the first Europe-wide standard to deal exclusively with the design for, and provision of, daylight. EN 17037 replaces a patchwork of standards across different European countries or provides one where no existing standard is present.

Could 3D Printing be the Future of Social Housing?

07:00 - 26 June, 2019
Could 3D Printing be the Future of Social Housing?, Cortesia de ICON e New Story
Cortesia de ICON e New Story

This is all quite recent: less than a year ago, a French family became the first in the world to live in a 3D printed house. Short of 20 years, this seemed like a distant dream, this new technology has developed quickly, and it arises as a possible contribution to the housing crisis around the world.

Cortesia de ICON e New Story © AI-SpaceFactory Cortesia de ICON e New Story Cortesia de ICON e New Story + 8

16 Brick Cladding Constructive Details

05:30 - 26 June, 2019
16 Brick Cladding Constructive Details, Brick Veneer Wall. Image Cortesía de Endicott
Brick Veneer Wall. Image Cortesía de Endicott

Traditionally, bricks have been used in architecture to fulfill a double function: structural and aesthetic. While they act as an effective and resistant modular solution in building structures, their faces can be exposed to constitute their architectural appearance, generating facades rich in texture and color, thanks to the iron present in the clay they are composed of.

At present, there are products that allow the attractive appearance of bricks to be merged with other structural systems, separating their functions and providing the necessary freedom of design so that the facades can adapt creatively in favor of the conditions of each project and the requirements of its users.

La Géode / ADHOC architectes. Image © Adrien Williams Four51 Marlborough / Hacin + Associates. Image © Trent Bell Photography Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building / Mecanoo + Sasaki Associates. Image Cortesía de Mecanoo Moody Center for the Arts / Michael Maltzan Architecture. Image © Nash Baker + 21

Urban Agency Designs a "Student Castle" in Ireland

04:00 - 26 June, 2019
Urban Agency Designs a "Student Castle" in Ireland, © Urban Agency
© Urban Agency

In their new student housing project, Walshe's Yard, Urban Agency has placed incredible importance on blending the building into its context while also providing a high quality of living for students. Located in Carlow, Ireland, the building is situated on the threshold between the looser urban periphery and the denser historic center of the town. The 3800 square meter project will include 125 bedspaces arranged into 32 “student houses” of either 3, 6, or 8 students, plus graduate studios on the top floor.

© Urban Agency © Urban Agency © Urban Agency © Urban Agency + 16

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