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Eduardo Souza

Architect and Urbanist graduated from the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC). Master in Urban Planning, History and Architecture Program, also at UFSC, with research related to the theme of mobility and urban sprawl. Interested in projects of urban requalification, non-motorized transport and public spaces, among many other subjects. Has been collaborating in ArchDaily Brasil since 2012 and is currently Editor of Architecture Classics and Articles.

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Alvaro Siza's Iberê Camargo Foundation Through the Lens of Ronaldo Azambuja

04:00 - 4 December, 2018
Alvaro Siza's Iberê Camargo Foundation Through the Lens of Ronaldo Azambuja, © Ronaldo Azambuja
© Ronaldo Azambuja

Alvaro Siza orchestrates, like no other, the experience of the visitor in his works. By means of compressions and decompression, openings and closings, volumes, voids and light, the Portuguese architect marks the paths, points of view, and perspective of the passage of time. In this photo essay, Ronaldo Azambuja photographed the Iberê Camargo Foundation ten years after its inauguration.

Tips For Drawing Trees in Architectural Renderings

04:00 - 29 November, 2018
Tips For Drawing Trees in Architectural Renderings, © Brasil Arquitetura
© Brasil Arquitetura

We all have that childhood memory of drawing a little house with a door and a window, a gabled roof, and a tree. But what sets architects apart from the rest of the population is that we continue to draw this after childhood, usually with a bit more technique. And just as our residential designs were becoming more complex and complete, the design of our trees needed to improve a bit as well (that broccoli-like shape would not please customers and teachers alike.) Although generally, trees are not the main focus of drawings, they play an important role in the composition of sketches, mainly to represent the scale, intended shading, or some intention of landscaping.

Invisible Doors: How to Stylishly Hide the Doors In Your Projects

02:30 - 16 October, 2018
Invisible Doors: How to Stylishly Hide the Doors In Your Projects, Linvisibile Alba Infinito Hinged Door, Microcement Finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile Alba Infinito Hinged Door, Microcement Finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile

Sometimes a door can be a huge headache in a project. Think of a continuous, clean facade... having a door in the middle of it can ruin the clarity of the design. But a door need not be the traditional wood-paneled, brass-knobbed portal most of us are used to, much less an eyesore. 

But what if they could disappear from sight entirely? We’ve all dreamed of hidden passages and secret rooms tucked away in our homes. But for these to work, the entry must be disguised or hidden itself. 

Linvisibile Alba Infinito Hinged Door. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile Linvisibile Alba Hinged door . Image Courtesy of Linvisibile Linvisibile Brezza Vertical Pivot Door. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile Brezza Bilico Verticale Metal. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile + 19

This Sound-Proof Installation was Built by Compressing Concrete and Bubble Wrap

05:00 - 11 October, 2018
This Sound-Proof Installation was Built by Compressing Concrete and Bubble Wrap, © Per Lundström
© Per Lundström
© Per Lundström
© Per Lundström

An installation at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden is made entirely of translucent concrete panels. Composed of concrete and bubble wrap, the site blends both high and low technology processes. This high-tech lecture hall is an amorphous space with unique acoustic qualities. 

The panels were created by compressing High-Performance Concrete between two layers of Bubble-Wrap. With 262,500 cavities and 1,000,000 membrane-perforations, the material creates a diffused echo-free ambiance.

The Versatility of Gabion Walls, From Infrastructure to Urban Furniture

04:00 - 11 October, 2018
Bosque Altozano Club House / Parque Humano. Image Cortesia de Parque Humano
Bosque Altozano Club House / Parque Humano. Image Cortesia de Parque Humano

Widely used in infrastructure, gabion walls are structures made of mesh metal cages filled with stones. These permeable walls use galvanized steel wire to withstand outdoor conditions. 

Bosque Altozano Club House / Parque Humano. Image Cortesia de Parque Humano BAH Restaurante Parkshopping / Tellini Vontobel Arquitetura. Image © Cristiano Bauce Restauración Paisajística del Vertedero de Residuos de la Vall d'en Joan / Batlle i Roig Arquitectes. Image © Jordi Surroca Mirador Asomo al Vacío. Image Cortesia de Loreto Mellado Medel + 62

Francis Kéré: "I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground"

08:00 - 27 September, 2018
Francis Kéré: "I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground", © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza

This phrase caught my eye during Diébédo Francis Kéré's speech at the AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress), which took place in Porto, Portugal from September 3 to 8. After being introduced by none other than Eduardo Souto de Moura, Kéré began his speech with the simplicity and humility that guides his work. His best-known works were built in remote places, where materials are scarce and the workforce is of the residents themselves, using local resources and techniques.

AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress at Oporto): see the lectures and workshops

13:20 - 31 August, 2018
AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress at Oporto): see the lectures and workshops, Courtesy of AAICO
Courtesy of AAICO

AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress at Oporto) is an initiative by AMAG, in partnership with Casa de Arquitectura, FAUP - Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto, SERRALVES Foundation, and the institutional support of Ordem dos Arquitectos.

What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments?

16:30 - 18 July, 2018
What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments? , Yago Veith. <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Badi-Oberer-Letten_Zuerich_Sommer.jpg'>Via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)</a>
Yago Veith. Via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)

As I left the streets of Zurich after attending a conference about the quality of life in urban environments, I came across a living example of the lecture I had just attended. I turned the corner and felt that I was inside an architectural rendering: the trees were pruned and green, there were no hanging electrical wires, cyclists drove elegantly along bike lanes, the tram moved quietly and punctually while bathers enjoyed their summer in rivers and lakes. To my surprise, I walked under an overpass and realized that even urban cities could be skilled and safe. After my stroll, I stopped for a cup of coffee and knew that the person that attended me received a fair salary and did not have to work three jobs to pay the bills (of course the coffee did not come cheap). However, these small, almost mundane observations for some, do provide a well-being and quality of life that may be difficult to measure.

How to Calculate Spiral Staircase Dimensions and Designs

08:00 - 17 June, 2018
How to Calculate Spiral Staircase Dimensions and Designs, © Matheus Pereira
© Matheus Pereira

Spiral staircases save valuable square meters because they occupy a much smaller area than a conventional staircase. With daring shapes and diverse configurations, they can also be iconic objects in projects. However, the design of these staircases requires careful attention so that you can prevent an uncomfortable or dangerous outcome. Although BIM software simplifies this process, it's always important to understand the restrictions and the underlying concepts.

Kengo Kuma and OODA Win Competition to Redevelop Porto Slaughterhouse

14:00 - 1 June, 2018
Kengo Kuma and OODA Win Competition to Redevelop Porto Slaughterhouse, © Luxigon
© Luxigon

Kengo Kuma and Associates, in collaboration with OODA, have won a competition for the redevelopment of an old industrial slaughterhouse in Porto. The competition was launched in 2017 to transform the building, now abandoned for 20 years, into an anchor for social interaction, while maintaining the memory of the early 20th-century building.

The scheme seeks to reconnect the previously important structure with the city center, through interventions such as a bridge linking the site with a nearby metro station. Meanwhile, a vernacular roof stretching across the entire site unites old and new, under which sits a museum, library, performance space, art archive, and creative laboratory. 

Cross Laminated Timber (CLT): What It Is and How To Use It

08:00 - 20 May, 2018
The Smile / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Alison Brooks
The Smile / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Alison Brooks

A few weeks ago we published an article on a recent sustainability crisis that often goes unnoticed. The construction industry has been consuming an exorbitant amount of sand, and it's gradually depleting. When used for manufacturing concrete, glass, and other materials, it is a matter that should concern us. Construction is one of the largest producers of solid waste in the world. For instance, Brazil represents about 50% to 70% of the total solid waste produced. But how can we change this situation if most of the materials we use are not renewable, and therefore, finite?

Popularized in Europe and gradually gaining attention in the rest of the world, Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) stands out for its strength, appearance, versatility, and sustainability.

St. Ovídio Chapel By Álvaro Siza Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra

14:00 - 22 April, 2018
St. Ovídio Chapel By Álvaro Siza Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra, © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

A pure volume, slightly lit, sits in the middle of a garden. It is a private chapel in Quinta de St. Ovídio in Lousada, built between 1989 and 2001 and designed by Álvaro Siza Vieira. The project starts from a path, where you can see the prismatic white volume from afar. As you pass through the building and some steps, you arrive at the entrance square. Here you will notice that Siza differentiated the main facade, in stone, from the other three, in white painted concrete, giving it importance.

Most Architects Prefer Working in Organized Spaces, But Some Opt for "Organized Chaos"

12:00 - 24 February, 2018
Most Architects Prefer Working in Organized Spaces, But Some Opt for "Organized Chaos", © Matheus Pereira
© Matheus Pereira

When we say "most" architects, we're basing our conclusion on the responses to our first AD Discussion of 2018. Even though Tim Harford, author of the book Messy, contends that disorder and a bit of confusion can be linked to spaces that inspire more creativity, our readers tend to disagree. In our review of comments on our article, the majority of respondents explained that workspaces with out-of-place objects negatively affected their ability to concentrate. Many responses alluded to their more efficient and prolific results gained by working in an organized space. But that doesn't mean that all ArchDaily readers agreed; there are still ardent defenders of "control chaos" who insist that their best work emerges from working beneath piles of papers or supplies.

Sangkep / IBUKU

02:00 - 20 January, 2018
Sangkep / IBUKU, Courtesy of IBUKU
Courtesy of IBUKU

Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU + 17

  • Architects

  • Location

    Jalan Raya Sibang Kaja, Banjar Saren, Abiansemal, Sibang Kaja, Abiansemal, Kabupaten Badung, Bali 80352, Indonesia
  • Client

    Green School
  • Area

    330.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2007

Aldo's Kitchen / IBUKU

00:00 - 15 January, 2018
Aldo's Kitchen / IBUKU, Courtesy of IBUKU
Courtesy of IBUKU

Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU Model. Image Courtesy of IBUKU + 20

  • Architects

  • Location

    Sibang Kaja, Abiansemal, Badung Regency, Bali, Indonesia
  • Client

    Green School
  • Site Area

    45000
  • Area

    500.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2007

Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2018

08:00 - 8 January, 2018
Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2018

The new year is here! And with it, a new slate of documentaries we're dying to see.

Of all the media forms, film seems to be the most adept at making a personal connection with viewers, offering a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of a great architect, the construction, and performance of a project or an issue that is confronting the entire architecture community. This year's films are no exception, as we get the chance to learn about the daily routines of Bjarke Ingels and Paulo Mendes da Rocha, projects by Tadao Ando and Glenn Murcutt, and the troubles of urbanization and gentrification.

Check out this year's list below, and find more great architecture documentaries with our Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2017, Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2015, our top 40 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2014, and our 30 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2013.

If We Were To Design The Ideal Building Material, It Would Look A Lot Like Bamboo

13:00 - 23 December, 2017
If We Were To Design The Ideal Building Material, It Would Look A Lot Like Bamboo, © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza

"Bamboo is close to an ideal structural material." This statement by Neil Thomas during his talk at Bamboo U, which took place in November 2017 in Bali, really caught my attention. Neil is the founding director of atelier one, a London office of structural engineering, whose outstanding projects include stage and scenography for the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, and U2; art installations by Anish Kapoor and Marc Quinn; the Gardens by the Bay, in Singapore, among many others. From the last few years, the engineer has exhaustively studied about bamboo, its structural properties and its most diverse potential.

Why Architectural Models Are Crucial in Making Bamboo Projects a Reality

14:00 - 22 November, 2017
Why Architectural Models Are Crucial in Making Bamboo Projects a Reality, © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza

Each material has its own peculiarities and, when using it for building, the design and construction process must accommodate these characteristics. A steel-framed building, for example, must be designed with a certain level of accuracy so that components and parts, usually manufactured off-site, fit together during assembly. A wooden building can have its cross sections drastically modified according to the species and strength of the wood used, or even according to the direction of the loads in relation to their fibers. With bamboo, no pole is exactly the same and each one tapers and curves differently, which requires a different approach when designing and building.

But how is it possible to work with a material with so many challenges and possibilities?