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Safety: The Latest Architecture and News

CTBUH 2019 International Student Tall Building Design Competition

07:00 - 16 April, 2019
CTBUH 2019 International Student Tall Building Design Competition

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) is pleased to announce its 8th International Student Tall Building Design Competition. The goal of the competition is to shed new light on the meaning and value of tall buildings in modern society.

CTBUH 2019 Student Research Competition: Tall Building Performance

15:40 - 11 April, 2019
CTBUH 2019 Student Research Competition: Tall Building Performance

The goal of the 2019 Student Research Competition is to assist talented students, working in groups under the guidance of a professor, to focus on a relevant research question, and create an engaging output as a response. Research proposals should directly relate to the 2019 topic of “Sustainable Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat”. Proposals can come from any topic/discipline, including but not limited to: architecture, construction, energy issues, environmental engineering, façade design, financial & cost issues, fire & life safety, humanities, infrastructure, interiors, maintenance & cleaning, materials, MEP engineering, policy making, resource management, seismic, social aspects, structural engineering, systems development, urban planning, vertical transportation, wind engineering, etc.

From China to Colombia, 5 Cities That Made Their Streets Safer With Urban Design

06:00 - 8 September, 2018
From China to Colombia, 5 Cities That Made Their Streets Safer With Urban Design, Joel Carlos Borges Street, in São Paulo, was transformed overnight to improve road safety, including enlarging the pedestrian area.
Joel Carlos Borges Street, in São Paulo, was transformed overnight to improve road safety, including enlarging the pedestrian area.

In 2015, the world community pledged to decrease half the number of deaths and grave injuries caused by traffic accidents by 2020. However, more than 3,200 deaths caused by collisions occur every day, and with the growing number of vehicles, that number can triple by 2030. 

The Science Behind the Next Generation of Wood Buildings

Sponsored Article
The Science Behind the Next Generation of Wood Buildings, UC San Diego Shake Table Test | Photo: NEHRI@UCSD
UC San Diego Shake Table Test | Photo: NEHRI@UCSD

At a time when engineers, designers, and builders must find solutions for a resource-constrained environment, new wood technology, materials, and science are accelerating efforts to enhance safety and structural performance.

International Building Code requires all building systems, regardless of materials used, to perform to the same level of health and safety standards. These codes have long recognized wood’s performance capabilities and allow its use in a wide range of low- to mid-rise residential and non-residential building types. Moreover, wood often surpasses steel and concrete in terms of strength, durability, fire safety, seismic performance, and sustainability – among other qualities.

Livability in the New American City

16:35 - 31 October, 2017
Livability in the New American City, Shop Meet Thrive
Shop Meet Thrive

Cities around the world are growing at an unprecedented rate, and for the first time in recent history represent the preferred place for people to live. Urbanization has historically aided millions in escaping hardship through increased employment opportunities, better education and healthcare, large-scale public investments, and access to improved infrastructure and services. The city has been the ideal for heightened livability for people worldwide.

Lighted Zebra Crossing is Lighting the Way to Safer Streets

16:00 - 1 January, 2017

Pedestrians, the most vulnerable users of road space, will now be more visible to drivers in the Netherlands with the inauguration of a new luminous pedestrian crossing this past November in Brummen, west of Amsterdam.

Designed by the Dutch firm Lighted Zebra Crossing, and installed free of charge for the municipality, this crossing makes pedestrians more visible at night or during bad weather. Each of the lines has two plates of lights that at night remain illuminated at all times and not only when there are people on them.