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Children: The Latest Architecture and News

Nurseries and Children’s Rooms: 20 Examples to Inspire the Imagination

Casa Jardim / asdesign. Foto: © Rafael Renzo
Casa Jardim / asdesign. Foto: © Rafael Renzo

Nurseries and Children’s Rooms: 20 Examples to Inspire the ImaginationNurseries and Children’s Rooms: 20 Examples to Inspire the ImaginationNurseries and Children’s Rooms: 20 Examples to Inspire the ImaginationNurseries and Children’s Rooms: 20 Examples to Inspire the Imagination+ 27

The room for babies or children is a space designed not only for rest and sleep time, but also to encourage imagination, bring symbols that help build perception of the world and, without forgetting, provide fun to the little ones. In addition to sheltering childhood, bringing functionality to this environment and adapting so many functions in the same area often require huge creativity by mothers and fathers, so the search for an architecture professional can be more than welcome.

Author Tim Gill on Building Child-Friendly Cities in Design and the City Podcast

In this episode of Design and the City - a podcast by reSITE on how to make cities more liveable – scholar, writer and consultant Tim Gill, author of Urban Playground: How Child-Friendly Planning and Design Can Save Cities, talks about the importance of designing cities that can foster play and empower children autonomy, as a way of creating inclusive urban environments fit for all ages and abilities. Gill argues for enhancing children's everyday freedom and discusses his research into ideas and principles that would make neighbourhoods rich in experiences in possibilities, which he defines as child-friendly urban planning.

Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children

The world certainly looks different through the eyes of a young child; enormous, intriguing, and somewhat overwhelming, and it has long been believed that what we encounter as children shapes up our perspective of the world. When asked about his childhood memories in Switzerland, Peter Zumthor shared that the memories of his youth contain the deepest architectural experience, which have become reservoirs of the architectural atmospheres and images that he explores in his work as an architect today. 

Having a complete understanding of how children change and grow physically and psychologically throughout their childhood requires an in depth observation of different factors, such as their hereditary traits and genetics, the interactions they have with other children and adults, as well as the environment they are living, playing, and learning in. In celebration of World Children’s Day on November 20th, we look at how architects and designers stimulated children's autonomy and promoted their mental and physical wellbeing through architecture and interior design.

Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children + 20

Olson Kundig Reinterprets Noah's Ark for Children's Experience at the Jewish Museum in Berlin

Completed in 2020, amidst the pandemic, ANOHA- The Children’s World designed by Olson Kundig for the Jewish Museum in Berlin is finally opening its doors to the young public. The design reinterprets the myth of Noah’s Ark and furthers the concept and ideas of a similar installation at Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, created by the firm then named Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen. More than a museum experience, the project is a space for community building, a place for imagination and play that enacts a universal story, creating an inclusive environment for children and families of all cultures and backgrounds.

Olson Kundig Reinterprets Noah's Ark for Children's Experience at the Jewish Museum in BerlinOlson Kundig Reinterprets Noah's Ark for Children's Experience at the Jewish Museum in BerlinOlson Kundig Reinterprets Noah's Ark for Children's Experience at the Jewish Museum in BerlinOlson Kundig Reinterprets Noah's Ark for Children's Experience at the Jewish Museum in Berlin+ 45

Children's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's Furniture

Children's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's FurnitureChildren's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's FurnitureChildren's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's FurnitureChildren's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's Furniture+ 53

Children's furniture is all furniture –fixed or mobile– that is designed according to the ergonomic guidelines and anatomical dimensions of children specifically. Following this definition, we can identify two types of furniture: (1) those that facilitate a relationship between the caregiver and the child, and (2) those that allow the child to use them independently.

The big difference between these two types is that the first has dimensions that mainly adapt to the ergonomics of the adult, while the second is designed to meet the ergonomic needs of the child at each stage of their development. Since the growth of children occurs relatively quickly, it is common for the furniture of this second group to be multifunctional or even extendable.

Pikler Pedagogy in Architecture: Wooden Furniture and Spatial Freedom

Emmi Pikler was a Hungarian pediatrician who introduced, in the years after World War II, a new philosophy on early childhood care and learning for children up to the age of 3. It was after the birth of her first child that she began to question: what happens when a child is allowed to develop freely? The observed results culminated in the introduction of a new methodology.

The Pikler approach facilitates the free development of children by caring for their physical health and providing affection but largely respecting their individuality and autonomy. Following this logic, intervention by adults becomes mostly unnecessary. Rather, for the child to experience space while moving freely, certain care must be taken in the preparation of the environments themselves.

Strategies to Improve Study Spaces at Home

Strategies to Improve Study Spaces at HomeStrategies to Improve Study Spaces at HomeStrategies to Improve Study Spaces at HomeStrategies to Improve Study Spaces at Home+ 23

In early 2020, along with the implementation of worldwide social isolation measures, we published several articles in order to help our readers increase productivity and comfort in their home offices. After months of continued isolation, surveys show that more than 80% of professionals want to continue working from home even after quarantine ends. In addition, a good number of companies are similarly satisfied with current work practices, showing a high tendency to adopt this practice indefinitely, since the majority of companies observed that remote work was as or more productive than face-to-face work.

However, with respect to children and home studying during the pandemic, the result was not as positive. One of the main reasons for this difference is that it can be difficult to get students to concentrate and motivate themselves for a long time in front of screens. Lack of physical interaction with other children is also a contributing factor. Yet until the global situation improves, it is likely that the return to schools will continue to be postponed. With this situation in mind, we decided to share in this article a series of efficient strategies to transform study spaces at home into better spaces for learning.

Neuroarchitecture Applied in Children's Design

Neuroarchitecture Applied in Children's DesignNeuroarchitecture Applied in Children's DesignNeuroarchitecture Applied in Children's DesignNeuroarchitecture Applied in Children's Design+ 21

It is unquestionable that environments directly influence the behavior and emotions of their users. Human beings spend approximately 90% of their lives indoors, making it imperative that the spaces we inhabit stimulate positive behavior and emotions, or at least don't influence us negatively. There exists a specific term describing the stimuli that the brain receives from its environment: neuroarchitecture. Several studies have been published on this topic, most focusing on its impact on work environments. This article approaches this concept through a different, yet essential lens: emphasizing its importance in the design of spaces for children in early childhood.

Open-Source Children's Furniture You Can Download and Manufacture Locally

In her Sesc Pompéia theater, architect Lina Bo Bardi designed a central stage revealing the structure and all the functions of the theater's program, and renouncing traditional theater seating. Her seats were not upholstered, were close to each other, and encouraged a more aware, attentive, and upright posture among the audience, thus honoring, according to her, the ancient art of theater.

In the same way that the characteristics of architectural spaces alter our mood, feelings, concentration, and learning, so does the integral design element of furniture, which must be taken seriously when considering comprehensive user experiences. Regarding schools and learning environments in particular, the same attention given to teaching materials is often not conferred on furniture and physical structure.

Open-Source Children's Furniture You Can Download and Manufacture LocallyOpen-Source Children's Furniture You Can Download and Manufacture LocallyOpen-Source Children's Furniture You Can Download and Manufacture LocallyOpen-Source Children's Furniture You Can Download and Manufacture Locally+ 12

Schools of the Future: How Furniture Influences Learning

It is a student's right to be educated in a safe, healthy, and even aesthetically appealing environment, especially young students for whom these factors are even more important. For example, it has been shown that when the ergonomics of chairs are inadequate, they can greatly affect levels of concentration and the development of skills such as calligraphy. At the same time, the effectiveness of traditional teaching methods is increasingly being questioned and the quality of alternative methodologies increasingly being considered. In other articles, we discussed in more detail the design of Montessori schools and the atmosphere of Waldorf interiors.

Today, we will cover the importance of choosing furniture and address some aspects to consider when organizing them in classroom design for the schools of the future.

Schools of the Future: How Furniture Influences LearningSchools of the Future: How Furniture Influences LearningSchools of the Future: How Furniture Influences LearningSchools of the Future: How Furniture Influences Learning+ 17

Foster + Partners Creates a Series of Architectural Activities for Children in Confinement

Foster + Partners has created a series of architectural challenges for kids, to learn and have fun during the lockdown. Available templates and activities include making paper skyscrapers, creating your own city, drawing trees, and imagining the future.