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Children: The Latest Architecture and News

Schools of the Future: How Furniture Influences Learning

It is a student's right to be educated in a safe, healthy, and even aesthetically appealing environment, especially young students for whom these factors are even more important. For example, it has been shown that when the ergonomics of chairs are inadequate, they can greatly affect levels of concentration and the development of skills such as calligraphy. At the same time, the effectiveness of traditional teaching methods is increasingly being questioned and the quality of alternative methodologies increasingly being considered. In other articles, we discussed in more detail the design of Montessori schools and the atmosphere of Waldorf interiors.

Today, we will cover the importance of choosing furniture and address some aspects to consider when organizing them in classroom design for the schools of the future.

Itoi Elementary School / Atelier BNK. Image © Koji Sakai Nursery School in Berriozar / Javier Larraz + Iñigo Beguiristain + Iñaki Bergera. Image © Iñaki Bergera Ledeer Daycare Center / Credohus. Image © Hong Li MRN Kindergarten and Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio BAUHAUS + 17

Foster + Partners Creates a Series of Architectural Activities for Children in Confinement

Foster + Partners has created a series of architectural challenges for kids, to learn and have fun during the lockdown. Available templates and activities include making paper skyscrapers, creating your own city, drawing trees, and imagining the future.

How to Design Schools and Interiors Based on Waldorf Pedagogy

Introduced by Rudolf Steiner, Waldorf pedagogy draws on the principles of anthroposophical philosophy. One of the theory's foundational characteristics is its holistic approach to the human being: feelings, imagination, spirit, and intellect are considered unique to every individual, and thoughts, feelings, and actions are understood to always be linked.

Thus, the focus of the philosophy is to cultivate individuals who are capable of relating both to themselves and to society (inter and intrapersonal intelligence) - fundamental skills for overcoming the challenges of the 21st century. This kind of learning takes place in schools that follow Steiner's method, introducing families to the school environment and bringing them into the community. Below, we review the operations and implications of this pedagogy. 

Yellow Train School / Biome Environmental Solutions. Image © Vivek Muthuramalingam After-School Care Centre Waldorf School / MONO Architekten. Image © Gregor Schmidt Marecollege / 24H Architecture. Image Cortesia de Boris Zeisser Escola El Til·ler / Eduard Balcells + Tigges Architekt + Ignasi Rius Architecture. Image © Adrià Goula + 19

Where Will the Children Play? How to Design Stimulating and Safe Cities for Childhood

'Cities for Play' is a project whose main objective is to inspire architects and urban planners to create stimulating, respectful, and accessible cities for children.

Natalia Krysiak, its creator, is an Australian architect who believes that children's needs should be placed at the center of urban design to ensure resilient and sustainable communities. In 2017, she produced 'Cities for Play,' studying examples of cities that are concerned with providing environments that are capable of promoting the health and well-being – physical and emotional – of children through a focus on play and "active mobility” in public spaces.

How to Stimulate Children's Autonomy Through Architecture and the Montessori Method

Maria Montessori began to develop her educational method at the beginning of the 20th century. In general terms, the method is a scientific pedagogy that promotes an education that positively contributes to the development of children's brains, respecting their individuality and stimulating their autonomy, self-esteem, and self-confidence. 

Although the method was created in the last century, science is currently beginning to test much of the information investigated by Maria Montessori. For this reason, it is  increasingly being applied to architecture for children’s educational spaces, improving the quality of children's learning and development and providing them with better tools for their future lives.

Cadeira Cubo. Image Cortesia de Cuchi Móveis Infantis Prateleira Pega Pega. Image Cortesia de Cuchi Móveis Infantis Montessori Kindergarten / ArkA. Image © Chiara Ye Preescolar Beelieve / 3Arquitectura. Image © Leonardo Finotti + 26

Building Better Schools: 6 Ways to Help Our Children Learn

© Velux Group
© Velux Group

Did you know that 64 million European children spend more time at school than anywhere else other than their home? European children spend approximately 200 days each year at their primary schools. With this information, how do we go about designing healthier classrooms that create productive learning environments? This question is perhaps more important than ever, as this will be the first time since the 1970s that Europe and the UK will see a boom in the construction and renovation of schools. What a tremendous opportunity this is for both architects and educators to rethink what an educational facility should be and how the physical environment can be designed to have a positive impact on learning.

© Velux Group © Velux Group © Velux Group © Velux Group + 22

Designing for Children: How Adult Decisions Shape Young Minds

The tale began with a simple idea - a toy that every child, regardless of age and ability, can play, dream, and learn with. But things turned out less than simple. Fights, lawsuits, and even a death all mark the road it took to make a now-ubiquitous toy a reality. The object in question? Lego.  

It’s tales such as this one that Alexandra Lange explores in her new book, The Design of Childhood: How the Material World Shapes Independent Kids. Some may scoff at the seemingly trivial subject matter. Surely children, with their boundless imaginations and appetite for play, can discover ways to find fun in anything.

Shaping the Future: What to Consider When Designing for Children

© Kyungsub Shin
© Kyungsub Shin

Le Corbusier stated in his seminal text, Towards a New Architecture, that “...man looks at the creation of architecture with his eyes, which are 5 feet 6 inches from the ground.” Logical and rational codes such as this form the standard for much of architectural production - but of course, these "norms" are as constructed as architecture itself. This particular standard is especially irrelevant when designing for children, for whom the adult-centric assumptions of architecture do not and should not apply.

© Katsuhisa Kida © Antoine Espinasseau © John Donat RIBA Library Photographs Collection © Dorte Mandrup + 24

Snarkitecture's BOUNCE Offers A Surreal Playground to Hong Kong's Waterfront

New York-based collaborative and design studio Snarkitecture have unveiled their newest interactive installation, bringing a surreal sense of play to Hong Kong’s waterfront. Titled “BOUNCE,” the installation features hundreds of 300% sized bouncing balls contained in a cage-like stadium, inviting the public to “create their own unique playing experiences.”

The program is spread across three locations, with the feature installation along the Harbour City waterfront, an indoor installation at the Ocean Center titled “Gallery by the Harbour,” and a children’s “Eyeball Maze” at the Ocean Terminal.

Gallery by the Harbour. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture Eyeball Maze. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture + 26

Meditate In This Mobile Nature-Inspired Pinecone Gazebo

Designed by Czech designers Atelier SAD and distributed by mmcité1, this mobile, nature-inspired gazebo is a playground must-have for children and adults alike. 109 waterproof, plywood scales are treated with resistant glaze and connected by galvanized joints to create a self-supporting, sustainable structure.

Courtesy of mmcité1 Courtesy of mmcité1 Courtesy of mmcité1 Courtesy of mmcité1 + 45

Open Call: Build School Project 2018

The Union of architects of Russia invites you to participate in the 2nd Russian competition with international participation "Build School Project 2018" on nursery, kindergarten and school designs and constructions, which will be held in the framework of the 2nd international exhibition "Build School 2018" from 25 to 27 September 2018 in Moscow in "Expocentre".

Gender Neutral Playground Inspires Creativity and Intellectual Development by Combining Art and Architecture

Having trained at Yale School of Architecture, Spencer Luckey decided to pursue a slightly alternate career designing vertical climbing structures to let children’s imaginations run free. Luckey Climbers are part jungle gym, part work of art that rise up off the ground with undulating platforms sprouting out, creating an abstract space to inspire creativity and intellectual development.

Call for Entries: Build School Project 2017

The Union of architects of Russia invites you to participate in the Russian competition with international participation "Build School Project", which will be held in the framework of the First international exhibition "Build School 2017" from 26 to 29 September 2017 in Moscow in "Expocentre". The major task of the competition is to ensure the quick implementation of the best architectural projects of preschool and school buildings, profile schools, sports, music, art, corps for initial classes, extensions to schools. The competition will promote best practices in the specific Russian context, the improvement of social infrastructure for children and the implementation

New Digital-Physical Building Block System Aims to Make 3D Modeling Accessible to Children

Modeling on the computer and physically building scale models are essential modes of iteration for the modern architecture studio. But what if this creative process of digital and physical ideation could be made accessible to everyone: children, hobbyists, and architects alike?

That is the question I set out to answer by designing an entirely new snapping block system, from the ground up, for the aesthetic and experiential expectations of the 21st century. It’s called Kible, and after putting architecture aside and developing it since November 2015, I’ve recently launched the product on Kickstarter.

The Future Architect's Tool Kit

Children with dreams of designing buildings will discover how architects actually work in this workbook, which builds on the concepts introduced in The Future Architect’s Handbook. It walks readers through the drawings created by Aaron, a young architect building his own home. Going a step further, children will learn the steps necessary to create their own drawings and build a model of their design, using an included tool kit consisting of graph paper and an architect's scale, pencil, and drafting eraser.