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Concrete

Could Carrots Make Concrete Stronger and Greener?

12:00 - 10 August, 2018
via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0
via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0

Carrots cannot help you see in the dark, but they could make your buildings stronger, and more environmentally friendly. Engineers at Lancaster University in the UK have worked in collaboration with Cellucomp Ltd UK to study the effects of adding “nano platelets” extracted from the fibers of root vegetables to enhance the performance of concrete mixtures.

The vegetable-composite concretes, made from vegetables such as sugar beet or carrot, have structurally and environmentally out-performed all commercially-available cement additives, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, doing so at a much lower cost. 

Drone Footage Shows Zaha Hadid's One Thousand Museum Tower Nearing Completion

12:00 - 8 August, 2018

New drone footage and photographs have been released of the One Thousand Museum, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, as work progresses in Miami, Florida. Having topped out in February 2018, the 62-story residential tower is due for completion later in the year.

The new imagery showcases the 700-foot-high (210-meter-high) tower’s curved structural exoskeleton, comprising 5,000 pieces of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete. The photo gallery also offers some of the first images of the scheme’s interior spaces, still under construction, showing the influence of the exoskeleton on the internal environment.

Courtesy of One Thousand Museum Courtesy of One Thousand Museum Courtesy of One Thousand Museum Courtesy of One Thousand Museum + 29

How to Bring Construction into the Future

09:30 - 3 August, 2018
How to Bring Construction into the Future, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "The 4 Forces That Will Take on Concrete and Make Construction Smart."

When it comes to building a bridge, what prevents it from having the most enduring and sustainable life span? What is its worst enemy? The answer is, simply, the bridge itself—its own weight.

Built with today’s construction processes, bridges and buildings are so overly massed with energy and material that they’re inherently unsustainable. While concrete is quite literally one of the foundations of modern construction, it’s not the best building material. It’s sensitive to pollution. It cracks, stains, and collapses in reaction to rain and carbon dioxide. It’s a dead weight: Take San Francisco’s sinking, leaning Millennium Tower as an example.

Modern, smart construction can and will do better. A convergent set of technologies will soon radically change how the construction industry builds and what it builds with.

Updating Antiquity: Using Modular Concrete to Create New Compositions

08:00 - 1 August, 2018
Updating Antiquity: Using Modular Concrete to Create New Compositions, © Madhava Kalmar
© Madhava Kalmar

Inspired by two of the oldest techniques in architecture, fluting, and reeding, Brooklyn-based GRT Architects have developed a series of modular concrete pieces that update the Greek tradition, varying its classic composition.

© Madhava Kalmar © Madhava Kalmar © Madhava Kalmar © Madhava Kalmar + 13

Ingenhoven Architects and Architectus Win Competition to Design Sydney's Tallest Residential Skyscraper

06:00 - 1 August, 2018
Ingenhoven Architects and Architectus Win Competition to Design Sydney's Tallest Residential Skyscraper , Courtesy of Doug and Wolf
Courtesy of Doug and Wolf

A beautifully delicate design by ingenhoven architects, in cooperation with architectus, has bested series of internationally acclaimed architects to design Sydney’s tallest residential tower at 505-523 George Street. The 79-storey skyscraper will reach 270m, and include several uses, ranging from high-quality living and retail to hotel and leisure. The designers hope the tower will be “a profoundly visible landmark standing for an economical, environmental and socially sustainable, future-oriented development”.

Courtesy of Doug and Wolf Courtesy of Doug and Wolf Courtesy of Doug and Wolf Courtesy of Doug and Wolf + 12

Brutalism & Skateboarding: J. Byron-H's Unique Furniture Inspired by An Odd Pairing

06:00 - 23 July, 2018
Brutalism & Skateboarding: J. Byron-H's Unique Furniture Inspired by An Odd Pairing, © Samuel McGuire
© Samuel McGuire

Architects and designers are turning into their very own version of Midas, everything they touch turns into concrete. With products like concrete coffee machines, concrete garden gnomes, and even concrete jewelry, designers are finding remarkable ways of experimenting with the material, proving that concrete is a lot more than just a bulky, building component.

Los Angeles based architect-designer J.Byron-H, known for his playfulness with material and unexpected forms, have experimented with concrete and glass-fiber and created contemporary, light-weight pieces of furniture, inspired by skateboards and architectural brutalism.

© Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire Courtesy of J. Byron-H + 40

Monday Monday Floral Art Studio / UM

19:00 - 5 July, 2018
Monday Monday Floral Art Studio / UM, © Che Liu
© Che Liu

© Che Liu © Jie Feng © Che Liu © Che Liu + 25

  • Architects

    UM
  • Location

    43 Yu Hang Tang Lu, Gongshu Qu, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Architect in Charge

    Mu
  • Area

    56.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners' 3 World Trade Center Opens in New York City

16:00 - 11 June, 2018
via World Trade Center
via World Trade Center

3 World Trade Center, designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, has opened for business in Lower Manhattan, New York City. At 1079 feet tall, and 80 floors, the scheme is the fifth-highest in New York, and the penultimate tower to be opened on the World Trade Center site. Construction of the tower saw over 4,000 union workers apply millions of hours.

The scheme forms part of a larger development of the World Trade Center site, including SOM’s One World Trade CenterBIG’s 2 World Trade Center, and a Transportation Hub by Santiago Calatrava.

© Joe Woolhead via World Trade Center via World Trade Center via World Trade Center + 13

World's First 3D-Printed Concrete Housing Project to be Built in Eindhoven

12:00 - 1 June, 2018
World's First 3D-Printed Concrete Housing Project to be Built in Eindhoven, Courtesy of Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten
Courtesy of Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten

The Dutch city of Eindhoven is to host the world’s first commercial housing project based on 3D-concrete printing, with the first of five planned houses due to start construction this year. The units were developed by a collaborative team including local firm Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten, and the Eindhoven University of Technology. The pods will be purchased and let out by a real estate company upon completion.

The first house will be a single-floor, three-room house measuring 1000 square feet (95 square meters), to be followed by four multi-story units. The irregular shape of the buildings is based on “erratic blocks in the green landscape,” made possible due to the flexibility of form permitted by 3D-printing

Morphosis Releases Images of Proposed Orange County Museum of Art in California

09:25 - 1 June, 2018
Morphosis Releases Images of Proposed Orange County Museum of Art in California, Courtesy of Morphosis
Courtesy of Morphosis

Morphosis has released images of its proposed Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) in California. The scheme hopes to create an “open and engaging urban presence within Orange County’s largest center for arts and culture” when it opens in 2021.

At 52,000 square feet, the museum will allow OCMA to organize major temporary exhibitions alongside spacious installations. The museum will contain nearly 25,000 square feet of exhibition galleries, representing a 50% increase on their current location in Newport Beach.

Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis + 7

New Photographs Show Construction of Snøhetta's Underwater Restaurant in Norway

12:00 - 29 May, 2018
New Photographs Show Construction of Snøhetta's Underwater Restaurant in Norway, © Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

Aldo Amoretti has released new photographs as construction continues on Europe's first underwater restaurant in Norway, designed by Snøhetta. The structure is currently being built on a floating barge in close proximity to its final location. Upon completion, the scheme will also house a marine life research center, teetering over the edge of a rocky outcrop, semi-submerged in the ocean.

Built from concrete, the monolithic structure will come to rest on the seabed 16 feet (five meters) below the water's surface, fusing with the ecosystem of the concealed shoreline. Below the waterline, the restaurant’s enormous acrylic windows will frame a view of the seabed.

© Aldo Amoretti © Aldo Amoretti © Aldo Amoretti © Aldo Amoretti + 17

Polished Concrete: How It Is Made and What to Consider When Using It in Your Projects

09:30 - 14 May, 2018
LIEVITO - Gourmet Pizza and Bar / MDDM STUDIO. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud
LIEVITO - Gourmet Pizza and Bar / MDDM STUDIO. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Polished concrete is a versatile material that is easily customizable in its appearance, using stunning aggregates, quartz, and colors to create a sense of industrial sophistication in both homes and commercial buildings. Its reflective surface creates an evocative quality under light, which can be suitable for a variety of programs.

While still mainly used as a material for interior flooring, architects have been pushing the limits of polished concrete for years, using it for feature walls, patio floors and even large exterior panels such as in David Chipperfield’s extension to the Saint Louis Art Museum

Brick House / Clare Cousins Architects. Image © Shannon McGrath Urban Man Cave / Inhouse Brand Architects. Image © Riaan West The Apple Store / pH+. Image © Tim Soar Kristalia New Headquarters / Sandro Burigana. Image © Paolo Contratti - Contratticompany Srl + 16

New Map Celebrates Toronto's Concrete Architecture

16:00 - 29 April, 2018
© Jason Woods
© Jason Woods

Concrete Toronto Map is the latest addition to Blue Crow Media's series of architectural guides. The London-based publisher collaborated with ERA Architects editorial team and Jason Woods photography to detail 47 of Toronto's concrete buildings and structures.

© Jason Woods © Jason Woods © Jason Woods © Jason Woods + 9

3XN and GERNER GERNER PLUS Reveal Competition Design for Undulating Aquarium in Vienna

12:00 - 23 April, 2018
3XN and GERNER GERNER PLUS Reveal Competition Design for Undulating Aquarium in Vienna , Courtesy of 3XN
Courtesy of 3XN

3XN and GERNER GERNER PLUS have released details of their competition entry for the design of a new aquarium in Schönbrunn Zoo, Vienna. Developed in collaboration with aquarium specialists ATT, “Poseidon’s Realm” was designed to be “elegant, simple and mysterious, lying across the landscape like a great veil.” The scheme was awarded second place in an international competition for the aquarium’s design, with the winner yet to be announced.

The “Poseidon’s Realm” scheme is defined by a spacious green roof landscape embedded in the zoo’s path network. The aquarium covers a total area of 65,000 square feet (6,000 square meters), divided across four levels, with a large, glazed, wave-shaped entrance enticing visitors to transition between outdoor greenery and a “softly undulating waterworld.”

Courtesy of 3XN Courtesy of 3XN Courtesy of 3XN Courtesy of 3XN + 7

AD Classics: French Communist Party Headquarters / Oscar Niemeyer

09:30 - 23 April, 2018
© Denis Esakov
© Denis Esakov

In March 1972, an article in The Architectural Review proclaimed that this structure was “probably the best building in Paris since Le Corbusier’s Cité de Refuge for the Salvation Army.”[1] The article was, of course, referring to Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer’s first project in Europe: the French Communist Party Headquarters in Paris, France, built between 1967 and 1980. Having worked with Le Corbusier on the 1952 United Nations Building in New York and recently finished the National Congress as well as additional iconic government buildings in Brasilia, Niemeyer was no stranger to the intimate relationship between architecture and political power.[2]

© Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/o_0/29118795843/'>Flickr user Guilhem Vellut</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 37

Studio Gang Unveils Images of Rippled Condominium Tower in Brooklyn, New York

14:00 - 19 April, 2018
Courtesy of Binyan
Courtesy of Binyan

Studio Gang has released details of their proposed condominium tower in Downtown Brooklyn, New York City. “11 Hoyt” has been designed with an emphasis on nature and community-building, responding to a lack of comfortable outdoor space in Brooklyn through the creation of an “outdoor-indoor environment."

The Studio Gang scheme, designed in collaboration with Hill West Architects, reclaims a former parking garage site in a rapidly-densifying area, where the population has increased by 40% in twenty years. 11 Hoyt is set to transform the site into an elevated green podium anchored by a 770,000-square-foot (71,000-square-meter) residential tower featuring a “scalloped” façade.

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners' 3 World Trade Center Nears Completion in New York

12:00 - 19 April, 2018
Courtesy of Silverstein Properties
Courtesy of Silverstein Properties

New images have been released of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ 3 World Trade Center in Manhattan, in advance of its June 2018 opening. The 1,080-foot-high (330-meter-high) building will be the fifth-tallest in New York City, and will feature the tallest private outdoor terrace in Lower Manhattan.

The scheme forms part of a larger development of the World Trade Center site, including SOM’s One World Trade Center, BIG’s 2 World Trade Center, and a Transportation Hub by Santiago Calatrava.

Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties + 11

The Next Sustainability Crisis: Humans Are Using So Much Sand That We May Actually Run Out

09:30 - 16 April, 2018
Objects made of Finite, a material developed by students from Imperial College London using desert sand. Image © Finite
Objects made of Finite, a material developed by students from Imperial College London using desert sand. Image © Finite

Sand is the most-consumed natural resource in the world after water and air. Modern cities are built out of it. In the construction industry alone, it is estimated that 25 billion tons of sand and gravel are used every year. That may sound a lot, but it’s not a surprising figure when you consider how everything you’re surrounded with is probably made of the stuff.

But it’s running out.

This is a scary fact to think about once you realize that sand is required to make both concrete and asphalt, not to mention every single window on this planet. The United Nations Environment Programme found out that from 2011 to 2013, China alone used more cement than the United States had used in the entire 20th century and in 2012, the world used enough concrete to build a wall around the equator that would be 89 feet high and 89 feet thick (27 by 27 meters).