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LGBTQIA+: The Latest Architecture and News

Architecture Between a Glorious Past and a Questionable Present: Interview with Greek Architect Andreas Angelidakis

Architecture Between a Glorious Past and a Questionable Present: Interview with Greek Architect Andreas Angelidakis - Featured Image
POST RUIN BENTIVOGLIO, curated by Antonio Grulli at Palazzo Bentivoglio, Bologna. Photo: © Andrea Rossetti / Courtesy of Andreas Angelidakis.

How might your persona or act differ if you were to put yourself before society’s expectations and limitations, embracing your queerness and preferences? Looking into the impact of individuality, we talked with Andreas Angelidakis, an architect to who refers to himself as “an architect who doesn’t build”, but views architecture as a site of social interaction, creating works that reflect on the urban culture by mixing ruins, digital media, and psychology to better understand the power of finding different design paths.

Homomonument: The Importance of a Representative Space in the City

Homomonument: The Importance of a Representative Space in the City - Featured Image
Homomonument in Amsterdam. Photo: Geert-Jan Edelenbosch, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

While walking through the city, have you ever felt afraid to be yourself? As strange as the question may sound to some, it is a reality for most LGBTQIA+ people, who at some point have been victims of hostility when they were noticed performing outside the "heteronormative standards" of public spaces. If violence comes from social layers that go beyond the designed space, this does not exempt the importance of thinking about projects that can integrate the physical sphere and insert a symbolic or representational factor to include and educate its citizens. This is the case of Homomonument, which for more than three decades, has become a platform for queer celebration and protest in the heart of Amsterdam.

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Non-Binary Space Apartment / Pachon-Paredes

Non-Binary Space Apartment  / Pachon-Paredes - Featured Image
© Luis Asín

Non-Binary Space Apartment  / Pachon-Paredes - Interior Photography, Decoration & Ornament, Kitchen, Beam, Countertop, SinkNon-Binary Space Apartment  / Pachon-Paredes - Interior Photography, Decoration & OrnamentNon-Binary Space Apartment  / Pachon-Paredes - Interior Photography, Decoration & Ornament, Bedroom, Beam, Facade, Bed, ChairNon-Binary Space Apartment  / Pachon-Paredes - Interior Photography, Decoration & Ornament, Facade+ 28

  • Architects: Pachon-Paredes
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  101
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2022
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Luis Asín

Queer Spaces and the Path of Positive Possibilities Within Architecture: an Interview with Adam Nathaniel Furman

Queer Spaces and the Path of Positive Possibilities Within Architecture: an Interview with Adam Nathaniel Furman - Featured Image
© Kaoru Yamada

"Growing up queer means experiencing the destabilizing absence of a broad and accessible queer history, most notably, in our case, in relation to spatial design". This account is what intrigued artist Adam Nathaniel Furman and architectural historian Joshua Mardell to bring together a community of contributors who bring new perspectives to the field of architecture and share stories of spaces that challenge cis-heteronormative morals, sheltering lives that seek to live their own truths. The result of this quest is a book titled Queer Spaces: An Atlas of LGBTQIA+ Places and Stories, which explores stories about distinct social, political, and geographical contexts within the community.

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Queer Spaces: An Atlas of LGBTQIA+ Places and Stories

A queer independent bookshop in Glasgow; an ice cream parlour in Cuba, where strawberry is the queerest choice; a cathedral in ruins in Nicaragua, occupied by the underground LGBTQIA+ community. Queer people have always found ways to exist, gather and celebrate and will always continue to. Therefore, there will always be a need for queer spaces.

“Thunderhead” Announced as Winning Proposal for Canada’s LGBTQ2+ National Monument

Canada’s Department of National Heritage, along with the Minister of Canadian Heritage Pablo Rodriguez, Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Youth Marci Ien, as well as the LGBT Purge Fund have unveiled “Thunderhead” as the winning concept of Ottowa's LGBTQ2+ National Monument competition. The winning design symbolizes a thunderhead cloud, which embodies the "strength, activism and hope of LGBTQ2+ communities, and will be a lasting testimony to the courage and humanity of those who were harmed by the LGBT Purge, homophobic, and transphobic laws and norms".

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Design Ethics: Rethinking Practice in 2021

Ethical practice spans all parts of architecture. From intersectionality and labor to the climate crisis, a designer must work with a range of conditions and contexts that inform the built environment and the process of its creation. Across cultures, policies and climates, architecture is as much functional and aesthetic as it is political, social, economic, and ecological. By addressing the ethics of practice, designers can reimagine the discipline's impact and who it serves. 

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SOM' Finalist Proposal for Canada’s LGBTQ2+ National Monument Features Empty Flagpoles as a Symbol of Collective Trauma

Canada's Department of National Heritage has announced the five finalists for the LGBTQ2+ National Monument competition, a project meant to honour the community and recall its oppression during the LGBT Purge period. Among the shortlisted designs is SOM's proposal, consisting of an array of flagpoles stripped of their flags, symbolising the trauma, deprivation of culture and concealment of identity that the LGBTQ2+ community was experienced. Designed in collaboration with Rebecca Belmore, Noam Gonick, and HTFC Planning & Design, the design titled Bapiiwin, meaning survival /overcoming in native Ojibwe, seeks to provide a space of remembrance while serving as a symbol of resilience.

MVRDV, Fathom Studio and Two Row Architect Reveal Finalist Proposal for Canada’s LGBTQ2+ National Monument

Canada’s Department of National Heritage has announced the five finalists for the LGBTQ2+ National Monument competition, a project meant to tell the story of generations of people who have been persecuted, specifically during the LGBT Purge period. Among the shortlisted designs is The Lens, a proposal that turns a symbol of oppression into an identity element and uses the landscape to express the community’s reverberation into society. Designed by a team comprising Canadian office Fathom studio, MVRDV and Two Row Architect, the proposal seeks to express resiliency, creating a space for memorialization and education while providing an inclusive space for the 2SLGBTQQIA+ community.

“Universal Representation Is Utopian”: Erica Malunguinho Talks About Urban Equity

When crossing a space, a body carries within it many meanings. The reading that translates into this person-architecture dialogue, and the sensations that arise from it, demonstrate much of the social inequality and violent structures intrinsic to the Western imagination, which privileges the same standard: the white man. Finding a place of rebalancing in which it is possible to create an alternation of power —in race and gender - is a commitment by Erica Malunguinho.

Architecture as Sexual Technology

By defining sexuality as one of several sexual technologies, Michel Foucault has expanded our understanding of sex. This way, the relationship between architecture and the body is shaped not only by the built object, with its various spatial mechanisms for the production of bodies, but also by thinking, in the form of academic discourse. And vice versa, since gender and sexuality also impact architectural theory. One way or another, these relationships are very rich and capable of expanding our knowledge about architecture and the creation of generic sexed bodies.

LGBTQIA+ Architecture: 10 Professionals From the Global South

How many LGBTQIA+ architects do you know? Surely you went to school with someone but probably never heard a professor mention one of them. Bringing up these names is key to understanding the fundamental role this population plays in the field of architectural theory and practice. This reveals their experiences more clearly, how they incorporate their identities into design and debates about architecture and urban planning. This is key for any person who identifies as LGBTQIA+ to feel comfortable expressing their individuality and their abilities in the profession.

Queer Looks On Architecture: From Challenging Identity-Based Approaches To Spatial Thinking

A growing number of theorists and practitioners have been discussing the impact of gender and race on the profession and theory of architecture. Issues linked to the relationship between the built environment, sexual orientation, and gender identity, however, remain particularly understudied, perhaps because of their relative invisibility and less clearly identifiable discriminatory consequences. Moreover, they are also completely neglected by design theory in the Francophone world. This article partially remedies the situation.

SWA Group Tapped for Memorial and LGBTQ+ Space at Harvey Milk Plaza, in San Francisco

Matt Hickman reports on San Francisco's latest inclusive memorial, for the Architect's Newspaper, designed by SWA, a firm that operates two Bay Area studios (San Francisco and Sausalito) as well as offices in Texas, Southern California, New York City, and Shanghai. Selected by FHMP from a shortlist of four firms that submitted proposals, out of 17 invited offices, SWA shared their winning conceptual design for the memorial at Harvey Milk Plaza.