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Le Corbusier

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Eileen Gray, Le Corbusier, and the E-1027 House: A Tale of Architecture and Scandal

09:30 - 17 September, 2018
Eileen Gray, Le Corbusier, and the E-1027 House: A Tale of Architecture and Scandal, © Manuel Bougot
© Manuel Bougot

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Sordid Saga of Eileen Gray’s Iconic E-1027 House."

It’s fair to say Eileen Gray’s E-1027 French villa hasn’t lived a charmed life: It has survived desecration by Le Corbusier, target practice by the Nazis, a stint as drug den and orgy destination, and near dereliction. However, of late, the infamous house’s future is looking more optimistic: Cap Moderne, a non-profit dedicated to rehabbing and opening the building as a cultural destination, recently launched a crowdfunding campaign to continue the building’s restoration. Over the last few years, the conservationists’ work had focused on the recreation of the building’s Eileen Gray–designed furniture. The latest efforts focus on a particular dining alcove. How that alcove—and the entire house—lost its furniture and fell into disrepair is a long story, with many twists and turns.

A Visual Portrait of Neelam Cinema, a Modernist Icon in Le Corbusier's Chandigarh

06:00 - 16 September, 2018
© Edmund Sumner
© Edmund Sumner

Neelam Cinema is one of three theaters built in Chandigarh, a modernist city master-planned by Le Corbusier. Built shortly after India gained independence in the early 1950s, the cinema is located in the bustling industrial area of Sector 17. Designed by architect Aditya Prakash under the guidance of Le Corbusier and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, the modernist structure stands to this day in its original form and continues to screen Bollywood films. However, without UNESCO World Heritage protection, the future of the cinema remains uncertain. Below, British photographer Edmund Sumner discusses his experience of shooting the 960-seat cinema, the heart of the city, and an icon of Chandigarh.

© Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner + 10

The Wild Churches of Kerala, Southern India as Captured by Stefanie Zoche

12:00 - 20 August, 2018
© Stefanie Zoche
© Stefanie Zoche

Photographer Stefanie Zoche of Haubitz-Zoche has captured a series of vibrant images showcasing the “hybrid modernism” churches of the Southern Indian region of Kerala. The images below, also available on the artist’s website, depict the blend of modernist influences and local architectural elements that defined many Indian churches following the country's 1947 independence.

As Zoche explains, the post-independence Indian church establishment sought to differentiate itself from the historic colonial building style, and hence drew inspiration from the modernist icon Le Corbusier. The buildings in Zoche’s gallery often display an “effusively sculptural formal language and a use of intense color” with Christian symbols “directly transposed into a three-dimensional, monumental construction design.”

© Stefanie Zoche © Stefanie Zoche © Stefanie Zoche © Stefanie Zoche + 29

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer: "To Understand a Building, Go There, Open your Eyes, and Look!"

09:30 - 8 August, 2018
Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer: "To Understand a Building, Go There, Open your Eyes, and Look!" , © Nina Vidic, via ELEMENTAL. ImageUC Innovation Center / ELEMENTAL
© Nina Vidic, via ELEMENTAL. ImageUC Innovation Center / ELEMENTAL

Six years ago Susan Szenasy and I had the honor of interviewing Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer for Metropolis magazine. While he was a federal appeals judge in Boston, Breyer played a key role in shepherding the design and construction of the John Joseph Moakley United State Courthouse, designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. In 2011 Justice Breyer joined the jury of the Pritzker Prize. Given his long involvement with architecture, I thought it would be fun to catch up with him. So, on the final day of court before breaking for the summer recess, I talked to Justice Breyer about his experience as a design client, how to create good government buildings, and why public architecture matters.

7 Shout-Outs to Architects in Rap Lyrics

09:30 - 23 July, 2018
© Messe Basel
© Messe Basel

About a month before he unveiled his eighth album Ye in June, Kanye West re-entered architectural conversation with the unexpected and mostly unexplained announcement that he intends to hire architects and industrial designers to staff an architecture practice connected to his Yeezy brand. An outspoken fan and admirer of contemporary architecture, Kanye’s fashion and design projects have been a major focus for him since shortly after the prodigious producer started making his own rap albums. Kanye’s architectural ambitions have been an interesting factor in the relationship between architecture and rap culture, which seems to be just coming into focus through programs like the Hip Hop Architecture Camps organized by Michael Ford’s Urban Arts Collective, and the research of Sekou Cooke. Architecture and rap music have influenced each other in ways we’re just starting to notice—with the connection between the two even revealed as consciously and conspicuously as rappers including references to notable architects in their lyrics.

Inside The Chandigarh Home of Le Corbuiser's Cousin and Collaborator Pierre Jeanneret

16:00 - 17 July, 2018
Inside The Chandigarh Home of Le Corbuiser's Cousin and Collaborator Pierre Jeanneret, © Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence

Paul Clemence of Archi-Photo shares rare images of the house of Pierre Jeanneret in Chandigarh. The photographer described the experience in an article published in Modern Magazine, which is republished below with permission.

Chandigarh, India’s modern planned city, is most commonly associated with the pioneering modernist master Le Corbusier, who conceived the radical urban plan and most of its important civic buildings. But credit is also due to the architect’s younger cousin and long-time collaborator, Pierre Jeanneret, who turned Le Corbusier’s sweeping vision into a reality. The cousins had worked extensively together, sharing a common, forward-thinking design sensibility. Appointed to senior architect, the Swiss-born Jeanneret oversaw the ambitious project on the ground and proved himself particularly skilled at connecting with the professionals and local community alike. “Effectively, he is respected like a father, liked as a brother by the fifty or so young men who have applied to work in the Architect’s Office,” wrote Corbusier in praise of his cousin.

How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?

09:30 - 2 July, 2018
How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?, Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet
Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet

From the Fundación Arquia Blog, architect José Ramón Hernandez brings us an article that reflects on projects that can only be appreciated because of who they were created by. If it weren't for the fact that they bear the signature of their illustrious creator, they most likely would have gone completely unnoticed or even despised.

Apartment in Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation Renovated to Original Design by Philipp Mohr

14:00 - 18 June, 2018
Apartment in Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation Renovated to Original Design by Philipp Mohr, © Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg
© Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg

Architect Philipp Mohr has led the renovation of an apartment at Le Corbusier’s iconic Unite d’Habitation in Berlin, carried out to the architect’s original design. Over the course of two years, Mohr’s team engaged with archival research, antique shopping, and the surveying of the Unite d’Habitation Marseille in France.

Mohr purchased the apartment in 2016 and embarked on a journey of demolition, measurement, and extensive renovation including lowering ceilings and moving walls in order to recreate the interior likely envisioned by Le Corbusier.

© Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg © Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg © Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg © Didier Gaillard- Hohlweg + 23

No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

08:00 - 6 June, 2018
No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

In the ambit of architecture, much of the twentieth century is marked by a production that reads, in general, as modern. The foundations of this work have been the subject of discussion for at least six decades, bringing together conflicting opinions about the true intention behind the modern gestalt.

Immerse Yourself in These Unbelievable Modernist Visualizations

08:00 - 24 April, 2018
© Alexis Christodoulou
© Alexis Christodoulou

Cape Town native Alexis Christodoulou is a winemaker by day but also dabbles in the art of 3D visualization. His Instagram (@teaaalexis) is a striking composition of intricate spaces rich with color, light, and materiality. Crafted entirely from scratch, each of Christodoulou's digital worlds appears to be influenced by many of the modernist masters. In a recent interview with Curbed, Christodoulou lists Aldo Rossi, David Chipperfield and Le Corbusier among his inspirations.

Much has been said about the new "Instagram aesthetic." Put that together with the emerging role of Instagram and other social media platforms in the design process, and the result is a new type of digital art form. Christodoulou's page is the creative collection of a year-long personal challenge to regularly create and publish images of his own fantasy worlds, which has resulted in a community of nearly 20K followers.

Get lost in more of the images below.

Why Are Architects So Obsessed With Piet Mondrian?

09:30 - 1 April, 2018

In the 1920s, Dutch-born artist Piet Mondrian began painting his iconic black grids populated with shifting planes of primary colors. By moving beyond references to the world around him, his simplified language of lines and rectangles known as Neo Plasticism explored the dynamics of movement through color and form alone. Though his red, yellow and blue color-blocked canvases were important elements of the De Stijl movement in the early 1900s, almost a century later Mondrian’s abstractions still inspire architects across the globe.

But, what is it about these spatial explorations that have captivated artists and designers for so long?

An In-Depth Look at the Le Corbusier-Designed Barge Which Sank Last Month

09:30 - 14 March, 2018
An In-Depth Look at the Le Corbusier-Designed Barge Which Sank Last Month, Image <a href='http://archipostalecarte.blogspot.com/2015/03/le-corbusier-pour-les-hommes.html'>via Archipostale</a>
Image via Archipostale

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Fascinating History of Le Corbusier’s Lost Barge."

This winter, France experienced some of the heaviest rains it has seen in 50 years. In Paris, the Seine flooded its banks, submerging parks, streets, and disrupting metro service. The deluge also claimed an architectural curiosity. On February 8th the Louise-Catherine, a concrete barge renovated by Le Corbusier, slipped below the murky waters of the Seine and came to rest on the bottom of the river by Quai D’Austerlitz on the east side of Paris.

As the floodwaters receded, the 100-year-old barge’s bow became stuck on the wharf, tipping it into the river, according to Le Parisien. Though firefighters were present and attempted to save the historic vessel, it filled with water and sank in a matter of minutes.

Balkrishna Doshi Named 2018 Pritzker Prize Laureate

09:55 - 7 March, 2018
Balkrishna Doshi Named 2018 Pritzker Prize Laureate

This year’s Pritzker jury has selected Indian architect Balkrishna Doshi, often known as B.V. Doshi or Doshi, as the 2018 Pritzker Prize Laureate. Doshi has been a practitioner of architecture for over 70 years. Previously, he had studied and worked with both Le Corbusier and Louis Kahn. Doshi’s poetic architecture draws upon Eastern influences to create a body of work that “has touched lives of every socio-economic class across a broad spectrum of genres since the 1950s,” cites the jury. Doshi is the first Indian architect to receive architecture’s highest honor.

Getty Assembles Experts for Conservation of Le Corbusier's Only Three Museums

08:00 - 3 February, 2018
Getty Assembles Experts for Conservation of Le Corbusier's Only Three Museums, National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo. Image © National Museum of Western Art
National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo. Image © National Museum of Western Art

The Getty Conservation Institute has announced a workshop to address the care and conservation of three museums designed by Le Corbusier. The three museums are the only museums designed by the prolific architect. The workshop will be held in India, where two of the three museums are, with municipal corporations from Ahmedabad and Chandigarh serving as hosts for the event. The Foundation Le Corbusier, located in Paris, will also be assisting with the workshop.

8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles

09:30 - 26 January, 2018
8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles, Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/7455207@N05/5491325900/'>Flickr user SBA73</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © Flickr user SBA73 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Throughout history, there have been certain architects whose unique ideas and innovative styles have influenced generations to come. Some of these pioneers introduced ideas so revolutionary that entirely new words had to be invented to truly encapsulate them. Whether they became a style embraced by an entire era, or captured the imagination of millions for decades to come, we know a Gaudiesque or Corbusian building when we see one.

Here are eight adjectives derived from the works of architects whose names are now in the dictionary:

Ronchamp by Le Corbusier. Image via <a href='http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Ronchamp-Snow-Chapel-Notre-dame-You-Skin-De-Ronchamp-372579'>Maxpixel</a> Farnsworth House by Mies Van Der Rohe. Image © Jack E. Boucher <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/il0323/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) Fuente de los Amantes by Luis Barragan. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/esparta/3573608700'>Flickr user esparta</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> Trinity Church, Boston by Henry Hobson Richardson. Image © Carol M. Highsmith <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/highsm.12234/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) + 9

The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

09:30 - 11 December, 2017
The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

Eyeglasses: the quintessential accessory of the architect. They are mini pieces of architecture you can wear, and an outward expression of your inner persona. Whether they be square, round, or wire-frame, black, white, tortoiseshell, or bright neon tones, they represent our visionary ideals. As such, many of the most iconic spectacles have an interesting history behind them; so here are the stories behind seven of the most recognizable eyeglasses in the architecture world.

Le Corbusier's Pavillon de l'Esprit Nouveau Named One of "20 Designs That Defined the Modern World"

14:00 - 12 November, 2017
Le Corbusier's Pavillon de l'Esprit Nouveau Named One of "20 Designs That Defined the Modern World", Courtesy of ADAGP, Paris 2015
Courtesy of ADAGP, Paris 2015

Creator of London’s Design Museum and columnist for CNN, Stephen Bayley named Le Corbusier’s Pavillon de l’Esprit Nouveau as one of, “20 designs that defined the modern world.” Before Bayley lays out the list, he gives a brief history and several definitions of design; culminating to his conclusion that design gives life meaning. Bayley writes, “Le Corbusier declared that design is ‘intelligence made visible’. That’s certainly true, but intelligence can take many forms…” [1]

New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture

16:00 - 4 November, 2017
New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture, © Jimmy Cohrssen
© Jimmy Cohrssen

London-based publisher Blue Crow Media’s architectural guide series continues with Concrete Tokyo Map. A collaboration with design writer Naomi Pollock and photographer Jimmy Cohrssen, the map lays out 50 of Tokyo’s concrete wonders.

© Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen + 10