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Retrofuturism's New Series Places Contemporary Landmarks in Old Persian Paintings

06:00 - 7 September, 2019
Retrofuturism's New Series Places Contemporary Landmarks in Old Persian Paintings, © Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
© Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

Architect and visual artist Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar has been conceptually combining contemporary landmarks with traditional Iranian houses and palaces, in a photo-series titled "Retrofuturism". In his latest collection, the Persian architect chose to displace iconic structures and place them in 19th century paintings of the country by artist Eugène Flandin.

© Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar © Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar © Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar © Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar + 10

Unexpected Ways Our Cities Are Becoming Smarter

04:00 - 7 September, 2019
Unexpected Ways Our Cities Are Becoming Smarter, Bleutech Park Las Vegas. Image Courtesy of Bleutech Park Properties
Bleutech Park Las Vegas. Image Courtesy of Bleutech Park Properties

Cities across the globe are undergoing makeovers - swapping out old, antiquated technology for new, sleek alternatives. The development and implementation of computer vision and real-time analytics are ushering in the newest wave of smart cities. The combination of cloud-based dashboards and machine learning are providing actionable data to be collected and understood regarding everything from vehicle concentration to pedestrian activity. As cities continue to push forward and develop socially and technologically, there is no doubt we will continue to see cities incorporate tools like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to facilitate such changes. Despite the fact that eye-popping technologies like drones and robots are at the forefront of this technological revolution, there are also a number of unexpected ways cities are becoming smarter.

How to Choose Kitchen Countertops: Advantages, Disadvantages and Inspiration

07:45 - 6 September, 2019
How to Choose Kitchen Countertops: Advantages, Disadvantages and Inspiration, © Martina Gemmola. ImageCasa de Gatos / WOWOWA Architects
© Martina Gemmola. ImageCasa de Gatos / WOWOWA Architects

One of the most practical and functional spaces of any residential project is the kitchen. Its artificial surfaces – be it countertops, kitchen benches, or coverings – contain most of the space's equipment. Thus, it’s essential to build kitchens with the most resistant and hygienic materials. Aside from these requirements, it's also important to pay attention to aesthetics and profitability, while adapting the space to the dynamics of each family. 

© Nikole Ramsay. ImageBluebird Townhouses / Altereco Design © Oliver Smith. ImageCreative Kitchen Designs and Their Details: The Best Photos of the Week © Josefotoinmo. ImageGAS House / OOIIO Arquitectura © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov. ImageStudio11 Minsk Office / Studio11 + 38

What We Don't Get About Climate Change

04:00 - 6 September, 2019
What We Don't Get About Climate Change, © Boris Radosavljevic, via Wikimedia Commons lisenced under CC BY 2.0
© Boris Radosavljevic, via Wikimedia Commons lisenced under CC BY 2.0

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Fellow architects, can we talk? This is gonna hurt, but it needs saying. Were I a poet, I’d write, The end is nigh, and we are why. I’m no bard, though, so I’ll put it this way: Most of us suspect anthropogenic climate change will lead to civilization’s end. Some architects deny the science (“The climate is always changing!”), while others ignore the obvious (denial is a good coping mechanism), but buried within the folds of all angst-addled designer brains lies the fear that today’s toddlers could be the last of us.

I’ll pause here to let the weight of that thought depress you.

How to Design Safe Bathrooms for the Elderly

07:00 - 5 September, 2019
How to Design Safe Bathrooms for the Elderly, © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza

There exist frequent reports of toilet accidents, as they are often located in tight and slippery places. Although no one is immune to a slip after bathing, it is the elderly who suffer most from falls, and can often suffer serious injuries, sequelae, and functional limitations. Due to the natural reduction of reflexes and muscle mass, the higher the age group, the more prone to falls we become.

To provide more comfortable living conditions as users grow older, the environment must adapt to the new physical capabilities of its occupants. Making toilets safer is critical to reducing the risk of accidents and decreasing response time in the event of a fall. Here are some things to keep in mind when designing toilets for older people:

Residencia para Mayores en Mota del Cuervo (Cuenca) / GEED Arquitectos. Image © Alfredo Prados Covarrubias Residencia geriàtrica Mas Piteu / Estudi PSP Arquitectura. Image © Francisco Urrutia Residencia para Mayores en Mota del Cuervo (Cuenca) / GEED Arquitectos. Image © Alfredo Prados Covarrubias Housing for Elderly People in Huningue / Dominique Coulon & associés. Image © Eugene Pons + 11

Thoughts on Cities and the Human Body - Eyes and Ears of the City / ZHANG, (Brian) Li for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

04:00 - 5 September, 2019
Thoughts on Cities and the Human Body - Eyes and Ears of the City / ZHANG, (Brian) Li for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, Pic.3 Body Movement Recognition ©Comixboy at English Wikipedia
Pic.3 Body Movement Recognition ©Comixboy at English Wikipedia

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

The human body, at least in terms of anthropomorphic ideals, was in the centre of western architectural debates from Greco-Roman times up to the Renaissance. Although the very concept of the body didn't come as explicit in traditional architecture writing in the east, the notion that the body (or, the envelope of the soul) connects the mind and the physical world was constantly revisited and reinterpreted.

Hello Wood Team on How to Create a Strong Community in a Week

07:00 - 3 September, 2019

Hello Wood, as you may already know, is an annual festival, which gathers hundreds of people in a Hungarian village for a week. Divided into groups, the architects and students carefully selected by the team of organizers, build installations made of wood with their bare hands. The outcome is amazing — dozens of beautiful structures rise up there each year adding more and more originality to the site.

The words cannot express the vibe you get at the Hello Wood Project Village — all the "beautiful people", as they call each other, are one big family. There is no competition, the teams help each other to make sure all projects are completed before the deadline, when they all march to the neighboring village and celebrate the week spent together.

But what is the idea behind this festival? What is the secret key to building a strong community of professionals and students in such a short period of time? Watch our interview with Hello Wood team to learn how they answer these questions.

How to Design Comfortable and Efficient Offices: Individual Workspaces

04:00 - 3 September, 2019
How to Design Comfortable and Efficient Offices: Individual Workspaces, Cortesia de Herman Miller
Cortesia de Herman Miller

The way of working has changed, but most offices remain the same.

However, innovating does not necessarily mean breaking down all the walls and creating a play space; the design of an office must take into account the needs and details of each work separately. Of course, for each function, there are better and worse ways to organize the spaces, and some configurations work better for certain activities. The important thing is that the place allows interactions while providing places for concentration and focus.

Clubhouse. Image Cortesia de Herman Miller Workshop. Image Cortesia de Herman Miller Haven. Image Cortesia de Herman Miller Jump Space. Image Cortesia de Herman Miller + 26

4 Unique Coworking Typologies, from Churches to Shipping Containers

07:00 - 2 September, 2019
4 Unique Coworking Typologies, from Churches to Shipping Containers, "Outpost" is Roam's Bali coworking and coliving space. Image via Roam
"Outpost" is Roam's Bali coworking and coliving space. Image via Roam

An established trend in the creative world and beyond, coworking is predicated on the idea that sharing space can offer both financial and productivity benefits. As demonstrated by Bjarke Ingels’ heavy involvement in WeWork, and the vibrant, dynamic workspaces created by Second Home, architecture and design play a heavy role in the effective design of coworking spaces.

ArchDaily Topics - September: Work

06:30 - 2 September, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - September: Work

The way we approach work has changed, and that is undeniable. Our profession no longer defines us as much as past generations, and new forms of work have been incorporated into everyday life. While technology has revolutionized our ability to perform a variety of daily tasks, many professions have disappeared, some will probably not last much longer and, while others were created.

Custom Surface Solutions for Community-Inspired Architectural Design

Sponsored Article
Custom Surface Solutions for Community-Inspired Architectural Design, Travis Science Academy created a large mural using custom Wilsonart By You (WXY) to showcase the pride of being a mustang.. Image Courtesy of Wilsonart
Travis Science Academy created a large mural using custom Wilsonart By You (WXY) to showcase the pride of being a mustang.. Image Courtesy of Wilsonart

Customization, within the context of interior architectural design, is a resurfacing topic among cross-disciplined design firms focused on interior architecture. Since the reemergence of the Localism trend, individuals and organizations increasingly seek one-of-a-kind experiences, objects, and spaces that can help deepen their connections to their communities.

London's Shades of Grey

08:00 - 1 September, 2019
London's Shades of Grey , © Grégoire Dorthe
© Grégoire Dorthe

Rarely does one see brutalist architecture in the city of London. Primarily, these buildings were perceived as rebellious and grotesque, only to become the "go-to" style for commercial and governmental buildings after the Second World War. Nowadays, with the real estate market demands and dominance of contemporary architecture, these monumental grey structures are gradually fading away.

Santiago-based architect and photographer Grégoire Dorthe developed the passion of photography during his military service, when he realized that through his images, he is able to freeze moments and preserve what will be lost with time. In his photographic series titled "Brutal London", the Swiss photographer captures the raw forms and graphic qualities of the city's brutalist architecture, before these buildings meet their end.

© Grégoire Dorthe © Grégoire Dorthe © Grégoire Dorthe © Grégoire Dorthe + 53

Photographic Series Captures The Hyper-dense Vertical Graveyards of Hong Kong

06:00 - 31 August, 2019
Photographic Series Captures The Hyper-dense Vertical Graveyards of Hong Kong, © Finbarr Fallon
© Finbarr Fallon

Hong Kong is considered to have one of the most exceptional skylines and urban schemes in the world: contemporary skyscrapers stand amidst the mountains and harbour, ancient houses nestled between futuristic structures, neon lights, landscapes... But among Hong Kong's numerous remarkable architectures, its spatial typology of death is like no other.

Over the course of five years, RIBA-nominated architectural photographer Finbarr Fallon captured the hyper-dense graveyards of Hong Kong, showcasing the sublime geometry of its mountainside burials in a series titled "Dead Space".

© Finbarr Fallon © Finbarr Fallon © Finbarr Fallon © Finbarr Fallon + 12

Trends Report August 2019: Robotics and Automation for Domestic Life

12:00 - 29 August, 2019
Trends Report August 2019: Robotics and Automation for Domestic Life, Courtesy of ArchDaily
Courtesy of ArchDaily

Throughout the past year, the concepts of Smart Homes (+160% YoY) and Domotics (+450% YoY) have been gaining traction as they define the automation and connectivity between devices found within homes, and which constitute the basic units of the growing Smart Cities concept.

Open More Doors: Supervoid

05:00 - 29 August, 2019

Open More Doors is a section by ArchDaily and the MINI Clubman that takes you behind the scenes of the world’s most innovative offices through exciting video interviews and an exclusive photo gallery featuring each studio’s workspace.

This month, we talked with Italian architecture firm Supervoid to discuss their design strategies and how they helped develop the office's interior space.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 15

New Book Tells the Forgotten Histories of Bauhaus Women

07:00 - 28 August, 2019
New Book Tells the Forgotten Histories of Bauhaus Women, Weavers on the Bauhaus staircase, 1927. From top to bottom: Gunta Stölzl (left), Ljuba Monastirskaja (right), Grete Reichardt (left), Otti Berger, (right), Elisabeth Müller (light patterned sweater), Rosa Berger (dark sweater), Lis Beyer-Volger (center, white collar), Lena Meyer-Bergner (left), Ruth Hollós (far right) and Elisabeth Oestreicher.. ImagePhotograph by T. Lux Feininger; collection of the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin
Weavers on the Bauhaus staircase, 1927. From top to bottom: Gunta Stölzl (left), Ljuba Monastirskaja (right), Grete Reichardt (left), Otti Berger, (right), Elisabeth Müller (light patterned sweater), Rosa Berger (dark sweater), Lis Beyer-Volger (center, white collar), Lena Meyer-Bergner (left), Ruth Hollós (far right) and Elisabeth Oestreicher.. ImagePhotograph by T. Lux Feininger; collection of the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin

This article was originally published on Metropolismag.com.

The Bauhaus was founded on the promise of gender equality, but women Bauhauslers had to fight for recognition. A new book recounts the achievements and talents of 45 Bauhaus women.

After the end of World War I, a spirit of optimism and a euphoric mood prevailed in Germany. Thanks to a new republican government and women’s suffrage, the war-torn nation was experiencing a radical new beginning.

As part of that convention-breaking wave, in 1919 German architect Walter Gropius assumed leadership of what would become the legendary Bauhaus. Initially, he declared that there would be “absolute equality” among male and female students.

What Would 6 Cities of the United States be like if Frank Lloyd Wright or Robert Moses had Designed Them?

04:00 - 28 August, 2019
What Would 6 Cities of the United States be like if Frank Lloyd Wright or Robert Moses had Designed Them?, New York Aereal View. Image © NetCredit
New York Aereal View. Image © NetCredit

New York Pedrestian View. Image © NetCredit Chicago Aereal View. Image © NetCredit Los Ángeles Aereal View. Image © NetCredit Houston Aereal View. Image © NetCredit + 18

The United States of America has provided enormous opportunities to develop some of the most iconic buildings in the history of architecture, leaving the mark of important architects in urban, suburban, and rural areas around the country. However, ambitious ideas often come with a high price that cannot always be paid,  causing some of the most exciting building, bridge, and tower designs to never evolve past archived plans.

What Materials Keep Buildings Cool?

04:00 - 26 August, 2019
What Materials Keep Buildings Cool?, © Valentin Jeck
© Valentin Jeck

Air-conditioning isn’t just expensive; it’s also terrible for the environment. Accounting for 10% of global energy consumption today, space cooling in 2016 alone was responsible for 1045 metric tons of CO2 emissions. This number is only expected to increase, with the International Energy Agency estimating that cooling will reach 37% of the world’s total energy demand by 2050.

Renzo Piano's California Academy of Sciences. Image © Tim Griffith A-cero's Concrete House II. Image © Luis H. Segovia Ambrosi I Etchegaray's Spa Querétaro is a contemporary example of a centralized water feature and courtyard. Image © Luis Gordoa Cooper Scaife Architects' Leura Lane, which features a reflective and lightly-colored skillion roof designed for summer shade. Image © John Wilson + 10

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