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Perched Over 2,000-Year-Old Roman Mosaics and Ruins, This Hotel Takes a Bold Approach to Historic Preservation

06:00 - 11 May, 2019
Perched Over 2,000-Year-Old Roman Mosaics and Ruins, This Hotel Takes a Bold Approach to Historic Preservation, As its name implies, the Antakya Museum Hotel is an unlikely hybrid in its program and architecture. As to the latter, the structure combines prefabricated concrete blocks with steel—a lot of it.. Image Courtesy Cemal Emden
As its name implies, the Antakya Museum Hotel is an unlikely hybrid in its program and architecture. As to the latter, the structure combines prefabricated concrete blocks with steel—a lot of it.. Image Courtesy Cemal Emden

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine.

Designed by EAA–Emre Arolat Architecture, the 199-room hotel in Antakya, Turkey, features prefab modules slotted into a massive network of steel columns.

The urban surfaces we walk on, planed sidewalks cleared of debris or asphalt streets kept in good repair, are simply the topmost layers of human-churned earth extending sometimes hundreds of feet belowground. In some cities, digging downward exposes dense infrastructure networks, while in others—Antakya, Turkey, for one—construction workers can’t turn over a rock without uncovering priceless relics. The newly opened Antakya Museum Hotel, designed by the firm EAA–Emre Arolat Architecture, has turned one such discovery into a bold new strategy for historic preservation.

Freek Persyn and the Power of Adaptation

07:00 - 10 May, 2019
Freek Persyn and the Power of Adaptation, Résidence Palaiseau, 51N4E. Image © Filip Dujardin
Résidence Palaiseau, 51N4E. Image © Filip Dujardin

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

An (ab)Normal Take on Architectural Representations

04:00 - 10 May, 2019
An (ab)Normal Take on Architectural Representations, © (ab)Normal
© (ab)Normal

Contemporary visualization tools have rendered exceptional illustrations, proving to be crucial in architectural representations today. However, some choose to explore objects in unprecedented manners instead of diving into "digital post-collage", unleashing different realms of design.

Created as an experimentation of visual narratives, (ab)Normal is a graphic patchwork that expresses design, scenography, illustration, architectures, and social utopias of a culture that revolves heavily around Internet, gaming, and religion. The iconographic images, which particularly focus on architectural representation, explore all the potentials of rendering, deconstructing, and reassembling photo-realism with a different hierarchies.

Jesus. Image © (ab)Normal Omotesando. Image © (ab)Normal The Ten Reincarnations of the Self. Image © (ab)Normal Unleashed. Image © (ab)Normal + 11

Spotlight: Gordon Bunshaft

17:30 - 9 May, 2019
Spotlight: Gordon Bunshaft, AD Classics: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beinecke_Rare_Book_%26_Manuscript_Library#/media/File:Beinecke-Rare-Book-Manuscript-Library-Yale-University-Hewitt-Quadrangle-New-Haven-Connecticut-Apr-2014-a.jpg'>Wikimedia Commons user Gunnar Klack</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
AD Classics: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Image © Wikimedia Commons user Gunnar Klack licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

As lead designer of the Lever House and many of America’s most historically prominent buildings, Pritzker Prize-winning architect Gordon Bunshaft (9 May 1909 – 6 August 1990) is credited with ushering in a new era of Modernist skyscraper design and corporate architecture. A stern figure and a loyal advocate of the International Style, Bunshaft spent the majority of his career as partner and lead designer for SOM, who have referred to him as “a titan of industry, a decisive army general, an architectural John Wayne.”

Hajj Terminal at King Abdulaziz Airport, Jeddah. Image © SOM - Jay Langlois | Owens-Corning Beinecke Rare Book Library. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joevare/5524134719'>Flickr user joevare</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Solow Buliding. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Solow_Building_New_York_August_2012.jpg'>Wikimedia user King of Hearts</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> W.R. Grace Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:W._R._Grace_Building,_New_York,_NY_10018,_USA_-_Jan_2013.jpg'>Wikimedia user WestportWiki</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 9

Accordion Doors And Windows: Opening Façades To The Outside

07:00 - 9 May, 2019
Accordion Doors And Windows: Opening Façades To The Outside, © Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon

As ingenious solutions for environments that require additional space and ventilation, articulated or accordion doors and windows operate by folding their leafs one over the other and onto the sides of the opening. They moving via upper and lower rails which can be embedded into masonry and allow separation and integration rooms while adding aesthetic value to the project.

This system generates a similar effect to that of a sliding door or window, but it differs in that all its leafs remain in the same plane when they are closed, giving a clean appearance to the façade.

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What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project

06:30 - 9 May, 2019
What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project, Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth
Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth

As technology moves forward, so does architecture and construction. Architects, designers, and planners around the world now have infinite tools and resources to design and build the cities of today and the future.  As promising as this may sound, new construction is also consuming our world’s limited resources faster than we can replenish them.

This situation leaves architects with an important responsibility: the rehabilitation and reuse of the existing built environment. This means using creative thinking and design to save and incorporate old or historic buildings that currently exist, in the present and future of our cities, by adapting them through creative and sensitive treatments.

Spotlight: Rafael Moneo

04:30 - 9 May, 2019
Spotlight: Rafael Moneo, National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2842858053'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
National Museum of Roman Art. Image © Flickr user pictfactory licensed under CC BY 2.0

As the first ever Spanish architect to receive the Pritzker Prize, Rafael Moneo (born 9 May 1937) is known for his highly contextual buildings which nonetheless remain committed to modernist stylings. His designs are regularly credited as achieving the elusive quality of "timelessness"; as critic Robert Campbell wrote in his essay about Moneo for the Pritzker Prize, "a Moneo building creates an awareness of time by remembering its antecedents. It then layers this memory against its mission in the contemporary world."

National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2840558654'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Columbia University Northwest Corner Building / Rafael Moneo, Davis Brody Bond, and Moneo Brock Studio. Image © Michael Moran Studio Puig Tower / Rafael Moneo + Antonio Puig, Josep Riu GCA Architects + Lucho Marcial. Image © Rafael Vargas Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cwsteeds/5324514176/'>Flickr user cwsteeds</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 11

The Extraction Infrastructure Web / J. Meejin Yoon's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

04:00 - 9 May, 2019
The Extraction Infrastructure Web  / J. Meejin Yoon's Response to Curatorial Statement at Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, The Extraction Infrastructure Web. Image © J. Meejin Yoon, Alexander Kobald, Borislav Angelov, Valeria Rivera
The Extraction Infrastructure Web. Image © J. Meejin Yoon, Alexander Kobald, Borislav Angelov, Valeria Rivera

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions". Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at UABB 2019 to set up a discussion on how new technologies - and Artificial Intelligence in particular - might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, Politecnico di Torino, and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” open call until May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

Urban development has intensified the development of a national landscape of energy production – a territory that could be called the ‘extraction infrastructure web’. This landscape exists out of sight; obfuscated by a complex distribution of corporate, government and environmental databases. The city benefits from the energy network, while averting its gaze from the social and environmental consequences of the flow of energy from the territories of extraction to the metropolis. 

ArchDaily Topics - May: Use & Reuse

12:00 - 8 May, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - May: Use & Reuse, Courtesy of ArchDaily
Courtesy of ArchDaily

“The greenest building is the one that is already built." (Carl Elefante, FAIA)

The world’s urban population will double by 2050, and cities need to come up with sustainable ways to accommodate this mass movement. We often see projects being built as quickly as possible to support growth, however, rapid growth often leads to cities and buildings that lack originality.

A smarter and more sustainable solution is to increase the density of existing centers, as well as to recover existing structures through refurbishment and repurposing. But, turning something old into something new is a challenging process — it requires a bold vision and a rigorous commitment to design.

7 Wonders of the Ancient World Brought Back to Life

11:00 - 8 May, 2019

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World were regarded among 2nd-century scholars as the finest works of architecture on the planet. Some of these iconic structures, including the Great Pyramid of Giza, still survive to this day, albeit in a ruined state when contrasted with how they would have looked 2000 years ago. 

10 Exemplary Ways to Represent Architectonic Construction Details

07:00 - 8 May, 2019
10 Exemplary Ways to Represent Architectonic Construction Details, Project: Altos de San Antonio Club House / Dutari Viale Arquitectos. Image via © Dutari Viale Arquitectos
Project: Altos de San Antonio Club House / Dutari Viale Arquitectos. Image via © Dutari Viale Arquitectos

The visual presentation of a project, which architects are responsible for, must effectively communicate and analyze the organization of the project's material elements. This essential creative process allows those involved to effectively identify and even modify key aspects and components of the building during all phases of its conception.

Because of the inherent challenges of material selection and other practical issues, the development of what exactly will be built tends to be relegated to the end of the design process. But a true understanding of minor yet invaluable details is among the most interesting and important aspects of the best architectural projects.

In our search for the most outstanding recent examples of construction detail representations, we've collected a series of ten drawings that celebrate different styles and approaches.

*Editor's note: the following article was written by an editor of ArchDaily in Spanish. Some project descriptions mentioned have not yet been translated into English, but we are actively working to make this information available to our global readers. 

Discover Pritzker Prize Laureate Gottfried Böhm's Brutalist Church in Brazil

05:30 - 8 May, 2019
Discover Pritzker Prize Laureate Gottfried Böhm's Brutalist Church in Brazil, © Ronaldo Azambuja
© Ronaldo Azambuja

Gottfried Böhm is a German architect who was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1986. His father, Dominikus Böhm and his grandfather Alois Böhm were both architects, as well as three of his sons, among them, Peter Böhm. Few people know that he has two projects erected in Brazil, in Brusque and Blumenau - two cities highly influenced by German culture. Photographer Ronaldo Azambuja shared with us his series of photographs of the mother church Igreja Matriz São Luiz Gonzaga in Brusque. The text was written by Angelina Wittmann, architect, and researcher.

© Ronaldo Azambuja © Ronaldo Azambuja © Ronaldo Azambuja © Ronaldo Azambuja + 38

Why Technology Isn’t The Answer for Making Cities Smarter

07:00 - 7 May, 2019
Why Technology Isn’t The Answer for Making Cities Smarter, via KENTOH/ISTOCK
via KENTOH/ISTOCK

Innovation and technology are often presented as inextricably linked ideas. Yet, when it comes to solving today’s urban problems, technology does not always represent the best way forward.

Innovation instead should come from a thorough understanding of the city’s functions and processes, including its municipal government and other local organizations. Technology can help, yes, but cannot be used as a panacea.

Rethinking Sacred Spaces for New Purposes

04:00 - 7 May, 2019
Rethinking Sacred Spaces for New Purposes, © Stijn Poelstra
© Stijn Poelstra

In the wake of the recent fires at Paris’ Notre Dame and the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, we have seen many architects propose new ways of rebuilding these sacred spaces, opening them up to new possibilities.

Historically, after the decline of the Catholic Church and the increasing loss of faith in several locations in Europe and in North America, the maintenance costs and the disuse of sacred spaces has led to the eventual abandonment of churches, shrines and monasteries with great architectural and historical value.

This opens a new opportunity for investors and architects to rescue and re-contextualize the historical heritage of these buildings. Below we present 15 examples of adaptive reuse in ancient churches--transformed into hotels, homes, museums, libraries and other cultural spaces.

Courtesy of Evolution Design © David Zarzoso Courtesy of Thomas Balaban Architect © Flos&Beeldpunt + 16

Aluminum Foam Facades: Architecture Rich in Texture, Porosity and Brightness

06:00 - 6 May, 2019
CaixaForum Sevilla / Vázquez Consuegra. Image © Jesús Granada
CaixaForum Sevilla / Vázquez Consuegra. Image © Jesús Granada

Modular coatings for facades and enclosures typically deliver fast and efficient solutions. However, many times they lack richness and character since they are repeated infinitely, without relating to the architectural design and its different functions and requirements.

These aluminum foam panels are manufactured through an air injection process in molten aluminum, which contains a fine dispersion of ceramic particulate. These ceramic particles stabilize the air bubbles, and create aluminum foam panels which provide an interesting level of detail and variability, generating unique facades with different levels of texture, transparency, brightness, and opacity. These ultralight panels can be used as flat architectural sheets, are 100% recyclable and available in standard sized formats up to 3.66 meters long (custom longer panels also available). 

Alusion™. Image Cortesía de Cymat Technologies Ltd. Alusion™. Image Cortesía de Cymat Technologies Ltd. Alusion™. Image Cortesía de Cymat Technologies Ltd. Alusion™. Image Cortesía de Cymat Technologies Ltd. + 20

Pdda: A Series of Small Architectural Drawings

08:00 - 5 May, 2019
Pdda: A Series of Small Architectural Drawings, Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia
Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia

Italian architect Gaetano Boccia has been researching drawings and architectural representation for the past two years. The Pdda (piccoli disegni di architettura) project was born with the intention of sharing Boccia's thoughts, which he has always cataloged and kept in notebooks.

Referring to no particular buildings, these drawings are part of an inspirational process that takes place in the architect's daily context and complex surroundings of Naples and Italian culture.

Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia Courtesy of Gaetano Boccia + 25

Building Images: A Video on How Social Media is Changing Architecture

06:00 - 5 May, 2019
Building Images: A Video on How Social Media is Changing Architecture , Courtesy of PLANE—SITE
Courtesy of PLANE—SITE

Before social media took over, buildings were published on magazines, edited and refined according to their architects’ preferences. Nowadays, magazines are left on the sidelines for a much more influential platform, one that is not totally controlled by the architects. Digital communication has changed the way people view and interact with architecture, providing architects with new insights on how to design their structures.

PLANE—SITE, a global production agency involved in the world of urban, cultural, and social spaces, have put together a short video that examines the impact of social media on architecture firms. Building Images provides insights from OMA/AMO and UNStudio, two firms with different approaches to social media, who explain how social platforms have helped them see their projects in unprecedented ways.

In Lake|Flato’s Eco-Conservation Studio, Sustainability and Education Go Hand-in-Hand

04:00 - 5 May, 2019
In Lake|Flato’s Eco-Conservation Studio, Sustainability and Education Go Hand-in-Hand, Known primarily for their ranch houses, which combine modern forms and rich local material traditions, Lake|Flato Architects have also developed an architecture of “eco-conservation.” An example is their Big Bend Fossil Discovery Exhibit in the middle of Texas’s Chihuahuan Desert.. Image © Casey Dunn
Known primarily for their ranch houses, which combine modern forms and rich local material traditions, Lake|Flato Architects have also developed an architecture of “eco-conservation.” An example is their Big Bend Fossil Discovery Exhibit in the middle of Texas’s Chihuahuan Desert.. Image © Casey Dunn

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine.

Green building was always part of the firm's DNA, though a little more than ten years ago Lake|Flato formed an internal studio that would focus on landscape and resource management.

For over three decades, San Antonio’s Lake|Flato Architects have advanced the cause of critical regionalism in South Texas. Founding partners David Lake and Ted Flato met in the office of O’Neil Ford, an early Texas Modernist whose work combined structural innovation with local building traditions. When they started their own practice in 1984, Lake and Flato carried this germ with them, turning out a series of ranch houses that garnered attention for their deft blending of modern modes of living, indigenous materials, and agro-industrial vernacular.

Changing Metaphors: an Interview between Ory Dessau and Zvi Hecker

08:00 - 4 May, 2019
Changing Metaphors: an Interview between Ory Dessau and Zvi Hecker , Palmach Museum of History, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1993- 1997. Courtesy of Zvi Hecker Architect. Image © Michael Krüger
Palmach Museum of History, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1993- 1997. Courtesy of Zvi Hecker Architect. Image © Michael Krüger

The conversation with renowned architect and artist Zvi Hecker (born 1931) followed Crusaders Come and Go, his exhibition at Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin (June-July 2017). In the first part, Hecker introduces his historical critique of the Modernist turn in architecture and its effect on city planning. He points out the tension between an urbanistic approach and approach which focuses on the impact of the single building. In the second part, Hecker tackles the notion of the architect’s style and positions his work against or in distance to the endeavor of cultivating a stylistic signature. In the last part, Hecker elaborates on a recurring motif in his work, the motive of the open book as a symbol, concept and formal dynamic reference.

From Concrete to Paper: Tadao Ando's Recent Works Displayed in New Monograph

06:00 - 4 May, 2019
From Concrete to Paper: Tadao Ando's Recent Works Displayed in New Monograph, Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture
Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture

Throughout his distinguished career, Pritzker award winner Tadao Ando managed to trigger every human’s sensations upon entering his structures. It was never just the buildings’ forms that let the architect earn his status, but the manipulation of light and shadow and the impulsive sensation of sanctity that his buildings impose, are what led him to become one of the world’s most renowned architects.

To showcase Ando’s recent works and to honor their ongoing relationship with the architect, Oris House of Architecture have created a monograph titled Transcending Oppositions, celebrating his buildings and their relationship with the contemporary culture of Japan. Judging this book by its cover, readers will have a clear notion of what to expect, as the monograph reflects Tadao Ando’s architecture on fine print.

Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture Courtesy of Oris Kuća Arhitekture + 7

16 Ephemeral Installations Designed by Mexican Architects

04:00 - 4 May, 2019

As we have seen throughout the history of architecture, ephemeral installations and pavilions are important tools for talking about specific moments in architecture in an almost immediate way. While it is true some pavilions have been so relevant that they broke with their ephemeral quality to become permanent, such as the German Pavilion in Barcelona, designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich, most are documented in photographs, plans and experiences to be rewritten in future projects.

Federico Babina's "Planimal" Reimagines Architectural Plans as Animals

11:00 - 3 May, 2019
Federico Babina's "Planimal" Reimagines Architectural Plans as Animals, © Federico Babina
© Federico Babina

Italian artist Federico Babina has published the latest in his impressive portfolio of architectural illustrations. “Planimal” seeks to convey the close link between architecture and the natural world, translating animals into architectural plans. Through his set of drawings, Babina reimagines the architectural spaces as “narrative subjects that host us and lead us into a fantastic labyrinth of a dreamlike reality, architectures imagined as allusively zoomorphic sculptures.”

Houses, museums, and churches are conveyed as roaring lions, crawling snakes, and swimming whales, with dynamic spaces formed from cocktails of asymmetries and symmetries, curves and straight lines, solids and voids, sounds and silences, lights and shadows.

© Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina + 26

Public Spaces Aren't Really Available for Everyone

07:00 - 3 May, 2019
Public Spaces Aren't Really Available for Everyone, World-recognized Shibuya crosswalk in Tokyo, Japan. Image © Sean Pavone
World-recognized Shibuya crosswalk in Tokyo, Japan. Image © Sean Pavone

When we talk about public space, we often imagine a park with happy, relaxed people on a sunny day. In actuality, this is a very restricted approach. A young woman does not cross a deserted street at dawn in the same way as a white man wearing a suit or as an immigrant who may not be welcomed by local citizens. Have you ever felt discriminated while visiting a public space?

In this edition of Editors’ Talk, editors from Los Angeles, São Paulo, Argentina, and Uruguay share their views on defining public spaces for everyone

The Story Behind Odile Decq’s Adventurous Architecture

05:30 - 3 May, 2019
The Story Behind Odile Decq’s Adventurous Architecture, FUTURE: Studio Odile Decq - TWIST Building. Image © Studio Odile Decq
FUTURE: Studio Odile Decq - TWIST Building. Image © Studio Odile Decq

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

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