Report Offers 10 Recommendations To Curb London’s Tall Building Boom

Areas such as Vauxhall (above) and Stratford have seen a dramatic rise in high-density housing. Image © Flickr CC user Willard

A report released last week aims to highlight the problems involved in high-density housing in London, offering 10 suggestions for how to create future developments that offer density while maintaining the UK capital’s distinctive character. Produced as a follow-up to their 2007 report entitled “Superdensity”, four UK housing specialists Pollard Thomas Edwards, HTA, Levitt Bernstein and PRP Architects have produced “Superdensity: The Sequel,” aiming to address the dramatic changes that have taken place in London development over the intervening 8 years.

Read on for more of the report’s aims and its 10 recommendations for future housing in London.

Official Image Released Of New York’s 1775-Foot Nordstrom Tower

Official render released May 2015. Image © Extell via YIMBY

Update May 20th 2015: Once again uncovered by New York YIMBY, development company Extell has released the first official rendering of 217 West 57th Street, also known as the Nordstrom Tower, as shown above. Below, see our coverage of the first unofficial images from last year.

The designs of the Nordstrom Tower in New York, the world’s tallest residential building at 1,775 feet tall, have been revealed to New York YIMBY by an anonymous tipster close to the project. The project at 225 West 57th Street by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture will be one foot short of 1 World Trade Center, and with its 1,451 high roof will finally reclaim the title of United States’ tallest roof from Chicago‘s Willis Tower.

More on the Nordstrom Tower after the break

Watch Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard Take Shape in New York

Herzog & de Meuron‘s 56 Leonard is taking shape in New York. Due to top out this summer, the 60-story has become known as the “Jenga tower” for its cantilevered glass facade. Upon its completion in 2016, the 821 foot-tall (250 meter) Tribeca building will be comprised of 145 residences and will feature a Anish Kapoor sculpture at its base. Check out the Rob Cleary  above to view the building’s progress over the last year.

An Interactive Look at Japan’s Tall Building History

’s tallest skyscraper, Abeno Harukas. Image © Hisao Suzuki

A new research study conducted by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), entitled Tall Buildings in Numbers – Japan: A History of Tall Innovations, examines the evolution of tall buildings in Japan since the 1960s. The study highlights key innovations in Japan’s skyline through a compilation of graphic representations, including a timeline of notable highrises, a scatterplot of towers over 150 meters and annual construction rates, and a comparison of skyscraper density with regional populations.

View the interactive charts after the break.

eVolo’s 20 Most Innovative Skyscrapers

Cloucity / Juerg Burger, Ge Men, Qingchuan Yang, Yin Li, Wei Hou. Image Courtesy of

In the celebratory spirit of its recent 2015 Skyscraper Competition, eVolo has compiled a list of the contest’s most innovative submissions. 20 skyscrapers from 13 countries rose above the rest in terms of their unorthodox forms and imaginative solutions to socio-environmental issues. The avant-garde designs, which range from self-sustaining micro-climates to extensive sky-bound bicycle networks, address the cultural, social, and sustainable contexts of the future through groundbreaking means.

See all 20 innovative skyscrapers after the break.

Insiders Tip BIG to Redesign Foster + Partners’ World Trade Center 2 Tower

Orignial WTC scheme; Foster + Partners

A new report from the Wall Street Journal suggests that BIG may replace Foster + Partners to realize the 2 (WTC2) tower - the final tower planned to be built on Ground Zero. The 79-story tower, originally designed in 2006, was stalled due to the economic crash of 2008. 

According to the report, 21st Century Fox and News Corp have “tipped” to redesign the tower should they strike an agreement with project backers Silverstein Properties and The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to move into the tower. If the deal goes through, the two companies would occupy nearly half of the building – enough to kickstart development. 

Where the Real Skyscrapers Are (Hint: North Dakota)

Burj Khahifa (2717′), Tokyo Sky Tree (2080′), Shanghai Tower (2074′), KVLY TV Tower (2063′ centered), Center (1794′), Empire State Building (1454′), Eiffel Tower (1063′). Image © Flickr user Raymond Cunningham; Graphics courtesy of Medium.com

The Burj Khalifa might get all the headlines today, but for nearly half a century before it was built, some of the tallest structures in the world were actually in North Dakota, in the form of TV masts. In this post originally published by re:form on MediumCasey Tolan investigates the threatened industry that once gave the world some of its most heroic structures.

Name the tallest structures in the world. Maybe flashy skyscrapers in China or the Gulf States come to mind. Or maybe you’re thinking of U.S. icons like One World Trade Center in New York or the Willis Tower in Chicago.

You’re almost certainly not thinking of TV towers. But dozens of nearly anonymous towers around the United States, most in small rural communities, dwarf all but the tallest man-made structures in the world.

OMA Unveils Nhow Hotel Rai Project in Amsterdam

© OMA via NLTimes

OMA has revealed plans for what will be the Netherlands‘ largest hotel. Part of the Nhow chain, 91 meter-tall “Nhow Hotel Rai” (or Nhow RAI) will bring 650 rooms within three stacked cubes to the Amsterdam skyline. As the NLTimes reports, OMA was chosen ahead of eleven practices to design the project, which will include a television studio, art gallery and sculpture garden, spa center, a “3D holographic meeting space,” a multimedia presentation space, and 25th-floor lounge and bar area, in addition to the four-star hotel rooms. 

Video: One World Trade Center Features 500 Year Timelapse of New York City

When the One World Trade Center opens its observatory elevators in May, visitors will embark on an unusual journey back in time with animated timelapse that recreates the evolution of Manhattan‘s skyline starting from the 1500s. In just 47 seconds, visitors will relive the city’s architectural history, including the devastation of 9/11, while being lifted up 102 floors. Watch the video above, courtesy of The New York Times!

SHoP’s 626 First Avenue Coming Soon to NYC’s East River

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Construction is underway on SHoP Architects‘ newest addition to the New York skyline – 626 First Avenue. The conjoined residential towers, slated for completion in early 2016, aims to stimulate development on the city’s East River. Once complete, they will add 800 residential units to the area connected via a sky bridge. Featured amenities will include an indoor lap pool, communal lounge areas, rooftop deck, fitness center, and film screening room. In addition to the cooper structures, SHoP will also design all the buildings’ interiors and furniture, making the development a true gesamtkunstwerk.

Read on for more images of the project and a fly-through around the structure. 

Civilization 0.000: A Skyscraper for a “New Advanced Society”

Courtesy of

Imagine a future in which all the Earth’s divisions are removed: countries abolished, borders dissolved, and governments overthrown. Such is the version of planet Earth for which “Civilization 0.000″, the 2013 master’s thesis project by Dimo Ivanov of RWTH Aachen University, is designed. Envisioning a future free of “unnatural division” and where the earth’s resources are measured and meted out according to human need, the project proposes a series of interlinked skyscrapers or “0.000 Units” that harness local earth resources. Each of the units assumes one of 6 key functions: living space, education, resource management, production, energy storage, and electricity generation. Functions are determined by the environment in which the units are sited.

8 Influential Art Deco Skyscrapers by Ralph Thomas Walker

The Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building (now the Verizon Building) in . Image © Flickr user Wally Gobetz

No architect played a greater role in shaping the twentieth century skyline than Ralph Thomas Walker, winner of the 1957 AIA Centennial Gold Medal and a man once dubbed “Architect of the Century” by the New York Times. [1] But a late-career ethics scandal involving allegations of stolen contracts by a member of his firm precipitated his retreat from the architecture establishment and his descent into relative obscurity. Only recently has his prolific career been popularly reexamined, spurred by a new monograph and a high-profile exhibit of his work at the eponymous Walker Tower in New York in 2012.

Álvaro Siza to Design 122-Meter Condo Tower in New York

© Fernando Guerra via Instagram

Álvaro Siza has been commissioned to design his first ever US project. Planned to rise 122-meters on the corner of West 56th Street and Eleventh Avenue in New York City, the Siza – designed tower will be developed by Sumaida and Khurana – the same firm who just released designs for Tadao Ando’s first New York City tower: 152 Elizabeth Street. Stay tuned for more details.

The World’s Tallest Buildings Throughout History

Burj Khalifa. Image © Flickr CC user Colin Capelle

Graphic artist and designer Martin Vargic of Halcyon Maps has created a fascinating set of infographics that showcase both the cultural typologies of each continent’s architecture as well as the evolution of its tallest buildings throughout history. Exploring the progression of height differences of the tallest buildings in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, South America, and Oceania, Vargic’s visually-striking charts detail 5,000 years of building history, from ancient to modern times.

Check out the charts, after the break.

Chinese Company Builds 57-Story Skyscraper in 19 Days

Image via BSB

“Three floors in a day is ’s new normal,” says a representative for this 57-floor skyscraper that was built in just 19 days. Known as the “Mini Sky City” tower in , the 180,000-square-meter mixed-use building was built in record speed with modular, “LEGO-like” blocks. The process also claimed to have required less materials and significantly reduced the amount of air pollution commonly caused by dusty construction sites.

A time-lapse of the construction process, after the break.

Perkins+Will’s “Sleek” Manhattan Tower to Feature Five Open-Air Gardens

© / MIR

Conceptual plans of Perkins+Will’s East 37th Street Residential Tower in New York City have been unveiled. Debuted in Cannes, France, during MIPIM, where the high-rise received a “Future Projects Award,” the 700-foot-tall tower boasts a “shimmering, angled curtain wall” organized by five clusters of shared amenities and open-air gardens.

More about the 65-story, 150,000-square-foot condominium tower, after the break. 

New London Architecture Reveals The Latest Figures in The City’s Tall Building Boom

© Jason Hawkes

“If doesn’t grow up, it will need to grow out.” Following last year’s report, (NLA) in cooperation with GLHearn (an independent property consultancy) have released the results of their annual London Tall Buildings Survey. In 2014, they forecast 236 new tall buildings for the British capital, a figure which has risen to 263 buildings over twenty stories for 2015. Alongside this, they believe that around 14,800 new homes are “under construction for London.” 

See these numbers broken down after the break.

David Adjaye Unveils Major Residential Development Planned for Johannesburg

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Adjaye Associates has announced plans to transform a 17-floor post-modernist structure in Johannesburg’s central business district into a luxury mixed-use building that will be known as the “Hallmark House.” Scheduled for completion mid-2016, the project aims to “combine an African aesthetic with a contemporary vision” and form a new typology for urban living.

“The transformation of Hallmark House is an opportunity to apply fresh thinking to urban community and to address changing lifestyles with a more fluid approach to the way we inhabit cities,” says David Adjaye.