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Goettsch Partners Wins Competition for 1,312-Foot-Tall Tower and Mixed-Use District in Wuhan

16:15 - 18 May, 2017
Goettsch Partners Wins Competition for 1,312-Foot-Tall Tower and Mixed-Use District in Wuhan, Courtesy of Goettsch Partners
Courtesy of Goettsch Partners

Goettsch Partners has been announced as the winners of an international competition for the design of the new Optics Valley Center complex in Wuhan, China. Being developed by prominent developer Greenland Group, the project will consist of 3.4 million square feet (315,000 square meters) of mixed-use space across three buildings,  including a landmark 1,312-foot-tall (400-meter-tall) office tower that will “symbolize the future vision of Wuhan as the perfect balance between modern development and the environment.”

Courtesy of Goettsch Partners Courtesy of Goettsch Partners Courtesy of Goettsch Partners Courtesy of Goettsch Partners +7

Which Cities Have the Most Skyscrapers?

09:30 - 27 April, 2017
Which Cities Have the Most Skyscrapers?

There’s a lot that the presence of skyscrapers can say about a city. They can be indicators of anything from wealth to modernization to density, or a combination of all three, depending on where you look. This potential to observe trends in a city through the height of its buildings makes data on those buildings valuable to a multitude of industries, so companies like Emporis conduct and distribute research on topics like the newest, tallest, and most expensive buildings in the world. Keep reading to find out about the ten tall cities that are home to the largest number of skyscrapers—as defined by Emporis' definition of a building that is 100 meters or more.

The Tallest Buildings in Each State of the USA

08:00 - 21 April, 2017
The Tallest Buildings in Each State of the USA

We all know that the skyscraper was born between Chicago and New York (depending on who you ask or what you consider a skyscraper, but that's for another discussion). But what about the rest of the US? How does each state stack up in the race towards the sky? This infographic by highrises.com gives us a scaled approximation of the "height" of each state--with New York coming out on top and Vermont, well... Vermont's tallest building is an 11-story public housing project built in the 70s. 

The infographic also breaks down the purposes of the surveyed buildings, revealing that nearly 2% of the tallest buildings in each state are churches! Another interesting factoid? Nearly 1/3 of these highrises are named after banks.  

eVolo Announces 2017 Skyscraper Competition Winners

14:30 - 11 April, 2017
eVolo Announces 2017 Skyscraper Competition Winners, First Place: Mashambas Skyscraper / Pawel Lipiński, Mateusz Frankowski. Image Courtesy of eVolo
First Place: Mashambas Skyscraper / Pawel Lipiński, Mateusz Frankowski. Image Courtesy of eVolo

eVolo Magazine has announced the winners of its 2017 Skyscraper Competition. Now in its 12th year, the annual award was established to recognize “visionary ideas for building [high-rise] projects that through [the] novel use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations, challenge the way we understand vertical architecture and its relationship with the natural and built environments.”

This year, 3 winners and 22 honorable mentions were selected from a pool of 444 entries. Among this year’s winners are a modular educational center and marketplace for sub-Saharan Africa, a vertical stack of factory and recreational space, villages embedded in mountains and even a skyscraper built within a giant sequoia.

Second Place: Vertical Factories in Megacities / Tianshu Liu and Lingshen Xie. Image Courtesy of eVolo Third Place: Espiral3500 / Javier López-Menchero Ortiz de Salazar. Image Courtesy of eVolo Heal-Berg: Reverse Climate Changing Machine / Luca Beltrame, Saba Nabavi Tafreshi. Image Courtesy of eVolo Adaptive Capacity: A Socio-ecological Vertical Community in Tanzania / Adriann Jeevananthan. Image Courtesy of eVolo +32

The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade

04:00 - 11 April, 2017
The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade, New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller
New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller

Florian W. Mueller's Singularity series is, in the photographer's own words, "just the building – reduced to the max." These deceptively simple shots of the summits of skyscrapers from around Europe and North America, each set against in infinite gradient of sky, are symbols of architecture's effort to reach ever higher in evermore unique ways. For Mueller, who is based in Cologne, they are an attempt at abstraction. In isolation—and especially when viewed together—they are remarkably revealing as studies of form and façade.

Cologne. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hong Kong. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hamburg. Image © Florian W. Mueller London. Image © Florian W. Mueller +21

New Study to Investigate Skyscraper-Induced Depression and Motion Sicknesses

08:00 - 5 April, 2017
New Study to Investigate Skyscraper-Induced Depression and Motion Sicknesses, Courtesy of Flickr User Shashank Jain, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr User Shashank Jain, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Have you been experiencing motion sickness, depression, sleepiness, and even fear, as you gaze out of your window from the 44th floor? If so, you may be prone to “Sick Building Syndrome” – the informal term for side effects caused by swaying skyscrapers, according to experts at the Universities of Bath and Exeter, who are launching a £7 million ($8.6 million) study into their causes and prevention through testing simulations.

“More and more people are living and working in high-rises and office blocks, but the true impact of vibrations on them is currently very poorly understood,” explained Alex Pavic, Professor of Vibration Engineering at the University of Exeter. “It will for the first time link structural motion, environmental conditions, and human body motion, psychology, and physiology in a fully controllable virtual environment.”

CTBUH Crowns Ping An Finance Center as World's 4th Tallest Building

16:20 - 27 March, 2017
CTBUH Crowns Ping An Finance Center as World's 4th Tallest Building, © Ping An Finance Center
© Ping An Finance Center

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has announced the completion of the Ping An Finance Center in Shenzhen, China, according to CTBUH tall building criteria. At 599 meters (1965 feet), it is now officially the second tallest building in China and the fourth tallest in the world, behind only the Burj Khalifa, Shanghai Tower and Makkah Royal Clock Tower.

Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), the Ping An Finance Center is located in the heart of Shenzhen’s Fuitan District. The building contains over 100 floors of office space located above a large public podium, with a multi-story atrium providing retail, restaurants and transit options to the city and greater Pearl River delta region.

"The Big Bend" Imagines the World's Longest Skyscraper for Billionaires' Row in NYC

16:20 - 20 March, 2017
"The Big Bend" Imagines the World's Longest Skyscraper for Billionaires' Row in NYC, © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio
© ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio

In 2014, midtown Manhattan received its first supertall (taller than 1,000 feet) residential building, Christian de Portzamparc’s One57. The following year, Rafael Viñoly Architects’ 432 Park Avenue surpassed the mark, confirming the trend of sky-shattering, pencil-thin skyscrapers rising along Central Park’s southern edge. In all, at least 10 supertall projects have been planned for the neighborhood, earning it the nickname of Billionaire’s Row.

Responding to this phenomenon, architect Ioannis Oikonomou of oiio architecture studio has proposed an alternate solution, called “The Big Bend,” that asks the question: “What if our buildings were long instead of tall?”

© ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio +21

Dubai Frame Approaches Completion Amid Allegations of Stolen Intellectual Property

16:20 - 9 March, 2017
Dubai Frame Approaches Completion Amid Allegations of Stolen Intellectual Property, The Dubai Frame is scheduled to open later this year. Image via Instagram user bachir_photo_phactory
The Dubai Frame is scheduled to open later this year. Image via Instagram user bachir_photo_phactory

Dubai’s newest mega-attraction, a 150-meter-high, 93-meter-wide picture frame structure dubbed the “Dubai Frame” is approaching completion after a nearly two-year delay, and is set for opening in the second half of this year. At a cost of $43.60 million, the new building will stand as a symbol of the city’s rapid rise from modest settlement to gleaming metropolis, giving visitors a panoramic view of the boundary-pushing skyscrapers from the coast of the Persian Gulf.

It also may stand as a symbol of something far less idyllic: intellectual property theft.

Dubai Reaches Dizzying Heights With Possible Rotating Building

16:00 - 5 March, 2017

In the upcoming years, Dubai may become home to one of the world’s newest radical architectures—the first ever, rotating skyscraper. Designed by Dynamic Architecture’s Davis Fisher, the 80-story, 1,273-foot tower proposal features independent floors that can rotate 360 degrees in both directions, in order to provide more comprehensive views.

A static central core will connect the rotating floors together, each of which will be prefabricated off-site and attached to the tower afterward.

Tonkin Liu Reveals the Cradle Towers of Zhengzhou

16:00 - 19 February, 2017
Tonkin Liu Reveals the Cradle Towers of Zhengzhou, The Cradle Towers of Zhengzhou will contain apartments, offices, retail, leisure, and a hotel. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu
The Cradle Towers of Zhengzhou will contain apartments, offices, retail, leisure, and a hotel. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu

London-based firm Tonkin Liu has released images of its competition-winning Trade Centre in Zhengzhou, China. The Cradle Towers of Zhengzhou will comprise of five mixed-use towers swooping out of a ring-shaped podium. Inspired by the nearby Songshan mountainscape, the scheme aims to celebrate the city’s origins as it rockets into a high-tech future.

A family of five towers creates an urban mountainscape. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu A responsive facade creates a heavy base, and lantern-like tips. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu A ring-shaped podium contains a soft landscaped garden. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu A family of mixed-use towers with responsive facades and vertical gardens. Image Courtesy of Tonkin Liu +8

The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built

04:00 - 24 January, 2017
The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built, Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco
Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco

As long as there have been buildings mankind has sought to construct its way to the heavens. From stone pyramids to steel skyscrapers, successive generations of designers have devised ever more innovative ways to push the vertical boundaries of architecture. Whether stone or steel, however, each attempt to reach unprecedented heights has represented a vast undertaking in terms of both materials and labor – and the more complex the project, the greater the chance for things to go awry.

Ryugyong Hotel. Image © José Tomás Franco Robot Building. Image © José Tomás Franco CCTV Headquarters. Image © José Tomás Franco Cayan Tower. Image © José Tomás Franco +21

Newly Discovered Molecular ‘Glue’ May hold the Key to Strong Wooden Skyscrapers

06:00 - 12 January, 2017
Newly Discovered Molecular ‘Glue’ May hold the Key to Strong Wooden Skyscrapers, HAUT, a proposed 240-foot timber-framed tower to be built in Amsterdam. Image Courtesy of Team V Architectuur
HAUT, a proposed 240-foot timber-framed tower to be built in Amsterdam. Image Courtesy of Team V Architectuur

The key to engineering wood strong enough to support skyscrapers may lie in the interaction between molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair.

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge has solved a long-held mystery of how key polymers in plant cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials such as wood and straw. By recreating this ‘glue’ in a lab, engineers may be able to produce new wood-based materials that surpass current strength capabilities.

Michael Wolf Explains the Vision Behind his Hong Kong Photo Series, “Architecture of Density”

16:10 - 3 January, 2017

I see it a bit as my mission to document things in Hong Kong which are vanishing, which are disappearing, primarily through urban renewal

In this short film from Yitiao Video, photographer Michael Wolf explains the vision behind his momentous photo series, “Architecture of Density,” in which he captures the immense scale and incredible intricacies of the city of Hong Kong.

After living in city for 9 years and travelling abroad to work, Wolf describes the somewhat unpleasant circumstances which led him to turn his attention to his own environment.

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

04:00 - 5 December, 2016
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction +6

Australian Smart Skyscrapers Summit 2017

00:30 - 1 December, 2016
Australian Smart Skyscrapers Summit 2017, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Attracting a wide array of speakers from a multitude of structural and architectural fields from across the globe, this cutting edge industry event provides a unique opportunity for delegates to shape the future of the Australian skyline in years to come.

Eric Parry Architects' 72-Story Skyscraper Receives Approval from City of London

17:20 - 29 November, 2016
Eric Parry Architects' 72-Story Skyscraper Receives Approval from City of London, © DBOX for Eric Parry Architects
© DBOX for Eric Parry Architects

Eric Parry Architects’ 1 Undershaft has been granted planning permission from the City of London Corporation’s Planning Committee, which will allow the 73-story tower to become the tallest building in the London Financial District and the second tallest building in the UK, behind only The Shard.

© DBOX for Eric Parry Architects © DBOX for Eric Parry Architects © DBOX for Eric Parry Architects © DBOX for Eric Parry Architects +5

BIG’s VIA 57 West Wins the 2016 International Highrise Award

11:40 - 2 November, 2016
BIG’s VIA 57 West Wins the 2016 International Highrise Award , © Kirsten Bucher
© Kirsten Bucher

BIG’s VIA 57 West has been unanimously chosen as the winner of the 2016 International Highrise Award (IHA) for the world’s most innovative highrise.

One of the world’s most important architectural prizes for tall buildings, the award is presented by Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) every two years to the project that best exemplifies the criteria of future-oriented design, functionality, innovative building technology, integration into urban development schemes, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness.

© Kirsten Bucher © Kirsten Bucher © Kirsten Bucher © Kirsten Bucher +12