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Did the New World Trade Center Live Up to its Expectations?

00:00 - 4 October, 2014
Did the New World Trade Center Live Up to its Expectations?, © flickr user 76807015@N03. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
© flickr user 76807015@N03. Used under Creative Commons

The USA's tallest building shoulders one of the nation's greatest challenges: paying tribute to lives lost in one of the country's greatest tragedies. One World Trade Center in lower Manhattan has yet to be completed and yet has still recently been condemned by a number of critics, who cite the former "Freedom Tower" as an inspirational failure. Thirteen years after the attacks, the wider site at ground zero also remains plagued by red tape and bureaucratic delays, unfinished and as-yet-unbuilt World Trade Centers, Calatrava's $5B transit hub, and an absence of reverence, according to critics. Read some of the most potent reviews of the new World Trade Center site from the press in our compilation after the break.

Guggenheim Considers Competition for Second NYC Location

01:00 - 1 October, 2014
Guggenheim Considers Competition for Second NYC Location, Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1956-59 (Click image to learn more). Image © Flickr CC User Richard Anderson
Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1956-59 (Click image to learn more). Image © Flickr CC User Richard Anderson

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is planning to construct a second location in New York City. As reported on the Art Newspaper, the expansion project, known as the “Collection Center,” aims to “consolidate its staff and art storage into one efficient, multi-use building with a dynamic public programming component.” The news broke with the release of a curatorial job position, seeking personnel to assist in the center’s planning and a possible architecture competition that will ensure the “Guggenheim’s reputation for being a visionary architectural patron” is preserved. Meanwhile, the Guggenheim is expected to narrow its selection to six for its new Helsinki location in November.

New Practices New York: Upcoming Firms in the Big Apple

00:00 - 30 September, 2014
New Practices New York: Upcoming Firms in the Big Apple

WHAT: With its fifth biennial competition and exhibition, the AIANY New Practices Committee is proud to recognize six emerging architecture and design firms working in New York City. These firms will be featured in an exhibition opening on October 1 at 6pm at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place. This year, the opening of New Practices New York 2014 will also kick off Archtober 2014, Architecture and Design Month.

Tour a Building a Day Throughout Archtober

00:00 - 28 September, 2014
Tour a Building a Day Throughout Archtober, The Barbarian Group / Clive Wilkinson Architects © Michael Moran
The Barbarian Group / Clive Wilkinson Architects © Michael Moran

If you live in or plan to visit New York City during the month of October, we suggest you set aside some time to participate in one of Archtober’s many events. What is Archtober? Archtober is New York’s official Architecture and Design Month. Hosted by the Center for Architecture and the AIA New York Chapter, the annual festival organizes a plethora of architecture activities, programs and exhibitions to take place throughout city during the month of October. The goal is to raise awareness of the important role design plays in the city, celebrate the richness of New York’s built environment, and simply enjoy some great architecture. 

Archtober highlights include the Architecture & Design Film Festival at Tribeca Cinemas; the Municipal Art Society Summit for New York City, featuring over 100 speakers gathered “to debate the future of our city and spark conversations about planning, design, infrastructure, preservation, culture, and development;” the Pratt Institute’s "City by Numbers: Big Data and the Urban Future” symposium; and 31 architect-led “Building of the Day” tours. 

Preview a selection of building’s on tour after the break and find out how to reserve tickets.

Take a Walk on the High Line with Iwan Baan

01:00 - 23 September, 2014
View looking west along one of the Rail Track Walks. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)
View looking west along one of the Rail Track Walks. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)

Sunday marked the completion of the New York City High Line, a three-phased project that transformed the once disused elevated rail tracks on Manhattan’s West Side into one of the world’s most respected public parks. With the first section opening in 2009, architectural photographer Iwan Baan has been documenting the entire process. Now, for the first time we present to you a photographic journey through the completed High Line designed by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Take a look, after the break.

Paul Goldberger on the High Line

00:00 - 22 September, 2014
Paul Goldberger on the High Line, Courtesy of Instagram User: highlinenyc
Courtesy of Instagram User: highlinenyc

This past Sunday, New York celebrated the opening of the High Line’s final section. More playful and untamed than its counterparts, the elevated park’s northernmost segment seems to have pleased the critics. As Paul Goldberger explained, the High Line at the Rail Yards is “stunningly refreshing” and “gives you an altogether new, relaxed, low-key way of being on the High Line.” You can read Goldberger’s take on the new portion of the High Line here on Vanity Fair. 

The High Line’s Third (and Final) Section Opens this Weekend

00:00 - 19 September, 2014

Fantastic news: the High Line at the Rail Yards - the third and northernmost section of the park - will be opening to the public on Sunday, September 21! Read the full announcement: http://bit.ly/RailYardsOpening Photo of the Interim Walkway, one of the new design features in the Rail Yards, by Kathleen Fitzgerald | OCD

This Sunday (September 21), the third and final section of the New York City High Line will open at the Rail Yards. You can expect to see familiar benches morphed into picnic tables and seesaws amongst a lush, diverse and seemingly unkept landscape that is reminiscent of the “forgotten” tracks. As Piet Oudolf - the Dutch garden designer who worked with James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio & Renfro - described, the $75 million northernmost section will be an “introduction to the wild” that responds directly to the public’s desire to “walk on the original tracks.” Stay tuned for more images from the opening. 

Trading Parking Lots for Affordable Housing

00:00 - 17 September, 2014
Trading Parking Lots for Affordable Housing, 9x18 Scheme © Credit Peterson Rich Office/Sagi Golan via the NYTimes
9x18 Scheme © Credit Peterson Rich Office/Sagi Golan via the NYTimes

The cost of living in New York has skyrocketed over the years, causing one of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s biggest challenges to be the integration of affordable housing. Considering this, architecture critic Michael Kimmelman has spotlighted a plan that suggests trading parking lots for micro housing units. Envisioned by three young architects at the Institute for Public Architecture, the “9x18” scheme has the potential to transform the city by capitalizing on outdated zoning regulations that would unleash more than 20.3 million square feet of usable space. Read more here on the New York Times

High-Speed "Skyway" Aims to Shorten Commutes from Brooklyn to Manhattan

00:00 - 16 September, 2014
High-Speed "Skyway" Aims to Shorten Commutes from Brooklyn to Manhattan, © East River Skyway via New York Daily News
© East River Skyway via New York Daily News

New York real estate executive Daniel Levy of CityRealty has unveiled a proposal to connect Brooklyn’s waterfront to Manhattan with a $75 million “East River Skyway.” According to Levy, the high-speed gondola could shorten commutes to just four minutes and move more than 5,000 people per hour, while relieving congestion on ferries, subways and bridges. “[The Skyway] would be a relatively inexpensive and quickly deployable solution," said Levy. "It is essential to adapt New York City's transportation system to serve residents in these booming areas.” Levy will present the project in an effort to harness support at the Brooklyn real estate summit on Tuesday. 

Dwell on Design Heads to NY, October 9-11!

00:00 - 16 September, 2014
Dwell on Design Heads to NY, October 9-11!

Dwell on Design NY, curated by the editors of Dwell magazine, debuts at 82 Mercer in SoHo, NY. Join 5,000 design elite as Dwell upends the standard ‘trade show’ format and creates a unique forum to engage, learn, inspire and connect. ArchDaily readers can receive $10 off show passes for the inaugural event with code DODNY registering here

At this groundbreaking event, influential designers, architects, industry thought leaders and you, will discuss, collaborate and address today's most pressing design challenges in the contract design industry and beyond. Over three days, attend 20+ Dwell-curated presentations, panel discussions and dialogues on ‘hot button’ issues across hospitality, travel, office, academia, public spaces, urban infrastructure and more. Be sure not to miss program highlights Reimagining New York City’s Terra Firma, The Future of Transit, Building for ResiliencyThe New Malleable Office and more.

New York Shows that Protected Cycle Lanes are a Win-Win Improvement

00:00 - 15 September, 2014
New York Shows that Protected Cycle Lanes are a Win-Win Improvement, © Flickr CC User Paul Krueger
© Flickr CC User Paul Krueger

The introduction of protected bike lanes in many cities usually raises objections from motorists who believe that devoting an entire road lane to cyclists will restrict the flow of cars and add to congestion in cities. However, a study of New York's streets, which has been ongoing since the first protected bicycle lanes opened in 2007, has recently shown that the opposite is actually true: by separating different types of traffic, cars can actually get around faster.

That's before we even begin to discuss the safety benefits of protected bike lanes, with the study showing the risk of injury to cyclists, drivers and pedestrians all falling on streets where the protected lanes were installed.

Read on after the break for more results of the study

Construction Halted on SHoP Architects' Atlantic Yards Housing Project

00:00 - 5 September, 2014
Construction Halted on SHoP Architects' Atlantic Yards Housing Project, © SHoP Architects
© SHoP Architects

The saga of the long-awaited housing component in SHoP Architects' Atlantic Yards masterplan in Brooklyn took a dramatic turn this week, as contractor Skanska USA decided to halt all construction on the B2 BKLYN project, the first of 14 planned apartment buildings at the site. The decision is the result of a long-running dispute between Skanska and the developer Forest City Ratner (FCR) over the slow pace of construction, with only 10 of the building's 32 stories constructed so far - despite the project's initial deadline having passed three months ago.

The project was lauded before construction began in 2012 for its plan to use a system of fast and cheap modular construction. However Skanska claims that the design of this system, which was developed by SHoP Architects in collaboration with Arup, was flawed. With both the contractor and developer claiming that the other is to blame for cost overruns into the tens of millions of dollars, Richard Kennedy of Skanska told the New York Times that they "came to the decision to stop work on the project until our significant commercial issues are resolved."

More on the dispute after the break

Frank Gehry’s Design for Ground Zero Arts Center Shelved

00:00 - 4 September, 2014
Frank Gehry’s Design for Ground Zero Arts Center Shelved, Original Proposal. Image © Gehry Partners
Original Proposal. Image © Gehry Partners

Frank Gehry’s design for the performing arts center at ground zero in New York has been shelved and the planning board will instead select a design from three other finalist architects, the New York Times has reported. This follows on reports from February that Frank Gehry’s original design was being revised and his plans for an initial 1,000 seat center were being abandoned. “We’re in the process of selecting a new architect,” said John E. Zuccotti, the real estate developer who is the chairman of the arts center’s board. “Three architectural firms are being considered.” Gehry, however, has said that he’s heard “zero at ground zero” and hasn’t been informed of the board’s decision. To learn more about the plans for the performing arts center see the full article from the New York Times.

The 6th Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival Returns to New York City

00:00 - 29 August, 2014
The 6th Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival Returns to New York City, "Who Dares Wins: Zaha Hadid". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival
"Who Dares Wins: Zaha Hadid". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival

The 6th Annual Architecture and Design Film Festival is set to return to New York City on October 15th for five days of premieres and showings. With a special themed focus on Women in Architecture, the US's largest architecture-related film festival will present over twenty five feature-length and short films in a programme curated by Kyle Bergman and Laura Cardello. Designed to provide "rare glimpses and intimate portrayals of seminal figures and growing movements in the fields of architecture, design, urbanism and fashion," this year's festival will also feature a 3D film series exploring six iconic structures from filmmakers such as Wim Wenders and Robert Redford.

Explore the highlights and find out more about the festival after the break.

"Cathedrals of Culture: Centre Pompidou". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival "Dior & I". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival "Why a Film About Michele De Lucchi". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival "Christiana - 40 Years of Occupation". Image Courtesy of Architecture & Design Film Festival +5

Apple Awarded Patent for Flagship Store Design

00:00 - 28 August, 2014
Apple Awarded Patent for Flagship Store Design, © Flickr CC User Mathieu Thouvenin
© Flickr CC User Mathieu Thouvenin

The US Patent and Trademark Office have awarded a patent to Apple for the design of their flagship store on Fifth Avenue in New Yorkreports MacRumors. The patent, applied for by Apple in 2012, applies to the above-ground glass cube, which was originally designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and - after a renovation in 2011 - is made of just 15 glass panels with minimal steel fixings. More on the patent after the break.

New York's Oyster Bar: Serving up Reefs and Resiliency

00:00 - 28 August, 2014
New York's Oyster Bar: Serving up Reefs and Resiliency, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects' designs for Pier 42. Image Courtesy of Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects
Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects' designs for Pier 42. Image Courtesy of Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects

As part of Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects' ongoing blog at Metropolis Magazine about effective implementation of landscape design principles, this article discusses one of the more unusual methods developed to create resilience and prevent storm damage: oysters. Drawing on her experiences creating an oyster reef at Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects' Pier 42 project in New York, Johanna Phelps explains the challenges and opportunities that arise in establishing this unusual type of natural infrastructure in an urban location.

Since Hurricane Sandy struck New York in 2012, the city’s waterfront design discussions have focused on ideas of resiliency and planning for storm events. The recent Rebuild by Design competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Presidential Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, featured six winning proposals that all envisioned a beefed-up Manhattan shoreline capable of handling large storm events and other hazards effects of climate change. Of the handful of ambitious designs, Scape/Landscape Architecture's Living Breakwaters plan was the most interesting: the project called for the reestablishment of New York's erstwhile oyster reefs, which the architects said would improve local ecology.

A City Without Cars: New York's Recovery from Automobile Dominance

00:00 - 20 August, 2014
A City Without Cars: New York's Recovery from Automobile Dominance, © Flickr CC User Healey McFabulous
© Flickr CC User Healey McFabulous

Originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Playing in Traffic“, this article by Jack Hockenberry delves into the relationship between man and vehicle, illustrating the complex dynamic created in New York - a city with over 2.1 Million registered vehicles. Contrary to the car-centric schemes of New York's infamous former Master Planner Robert Moses, Hockenberry argues that the city is the "negative space" while vehicles are obscured by our unconscious. 

It is a curiosity of modern urban life that the more cars crowd into cities, the more they become invisible. It’s a great feature that comes standard on any model these days. Unfortunately we can’t control it from the driver’s seat—however much we would like to wave our hands and watch through our windshields as gridlocked cars disappear, liberating us from traffic imprisonment. The invisibility I am speaking about only works if you’re a pedestrian or bicyclist. The number of motorized vehicles parked or driving at any given moment on the streets of New York City is astounding. An estimated 2.1 million are registered in the city, according to the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles. Yet we never fully register them visually when we’re walking on the streets. The city is the negative space and that is how our eyes increasingly navigate urban landscapes. Everything around the cars and trucks gets knitted together by the eye and, even though the vehicles are present, we have gradually learned to ignore them unless we’re standing in the direct line of moving traffic.

Spatial Relations Take Centre Stage in MoMA's Newest Architectural Exhibition

00:00 - 12 August, 2014
Spatial Relations Take Centre Stage in MoMA's Newest Architectural Exhibition , Herzog & de Meuron’s National Stadium, Beijing. 2008. Image © Iwan Baan
Herzog & de Meuron’s National Stadium, Beijing. 2008. Image © Iwan Baan

What influence do art and space have on the contemporary architectural design process? MoMA's most recent exhibition on architecture and design Conceptions of Space strives to answer this question. Themed under the umbrella of spatial relations, Curator Pedro Gadanho ruminates on the subject in a broad and philosophical sense. The exhibition delves into the topic using an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating research from French philosopher Michel Foucault on the subject of the expanded field. The exhibition aims to explore the relationship between the development of space and its deep-seated roots in the creative arts.