Shukhov Tower’s Fate Put to a Vote

Aleksander Rodchenko, Shukhov Tower (1929)

Despite severe corrosion, with almost 70% of one its six sections “thoroughly corroded” according to the government, Vladimir Shukhov’s 1922 radio tower has never been restored. Earlier this year, a large group of international architects petitioned the government to save the tower, one of only 20 or so of Shukhov’s 200 towers still standing in . Now ’s government has put the fate of the landmark tower to a public vote.

Until July 6 Moscovites can use the  “Engaged Citizen” app to support one of four actions: hold an open competition to restore the tower, move the tower to a new location, move it to its historic location on Shabolovka street, or invent a new solution.

What do you think should be done? Let us know in the comments below.

3XN Chosen Over Windgardh, Arkitema to Design University Building in Sweden

Courtesy of

3XN has won an architectural competition – beating out WingårdhArkitema DotChristensen & CoJuul/Frost, and White – to design a new educational building for Mälardalen University in Eskilstuna (southwest of Stockholm, ). The project not only includes a new 18,250 square meter building, but also the renovation of a listed Modernist Public Bath Paul Hedquist. The new campus is planned to be ready in 2018. Read the architect’s description of the winning project, after the break.

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Arckit: Freeform Model Making System Hits the Market

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UPDATE: Arckit is now available in the US and EU! To celebrate, and ArchDaily are giving away two Arckit 240 kits (each worth $499). To participate, check out our Facebook Page!

Physical model making can be time intensive and expensive. However, thanks to the makers of Arckit, that will soon change. Based on a panel by panel modular system and a standard 1.2m grid, the newly released Arckit provides an easy-to-use, flexible model building system that allows architects to quickly construct and modify a diverse range of scaled structures. Architect tested and approved, the kit is currently available for purchase with a discount of 10% and FREE shipping until end July 2014. Simply log on to arckit.com to order (offer applies to US and EU regions only and while stocks last).

Does London Really Need the Garden Bridge?

© Arup

In an interesting analysis in the Guardian, Olly Wainwright draws attention to the questionable process by which of Thomas Heatherwick‘s Garden Bridge proposal has gained such strong support from the British government. It is, according to Wainwright, the product of “one voguish designer, one national treasure and one icon-hungry mayor” – however he contends that compared to other more needed potential bridges over the , the Garden Bridge may just be ”a spectacular solution to a problem that doesn’t really exist,” and a terrific waste of infrastructure funds. You can read the article in full here.

AR Names its 2014 House Awards

House for Trees / Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki

The winners of the 2014 AR House Awards have been announced, celebrating excellence and innovation in the design of a one-off house. This year, the jury consisted of AR Editor Catherine Slessor, Ben van Berkel (UNStudio), Yvonne Farrell (Grafton Architects), William Mann (Witherford Watson Mann Architects) and Abraham Thomas (Director, Sir John Soane’s Museum).

Read on after the break for the full list of winners

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Beachfront Observation Tower Confirmed for the British City of Brighton

Visualisation. Image Courtesy of Marks Barfield Architects / i360

British practice Marks Barfield Architects, famous for designing the London Eye, are a step closer to realising their latest urban observation structure: the i360 Brighton. This week the international team who created the London landmark were reunited on Brighton beach as as loans of more than £40 million have been agreed to begin the tower’s construction. Bringing together companies from the UK, France (Poma), the USA (Jacobs Enginneering) and the Netherlands (), the project has been described as “truly unique.”

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Call for Papers: STUDIO#07 – ILLEGAL

Contemporary society is based on written rules or not – whether right or wrong – that influence people’s existence, thus as in everyday’s life, also the city creates its rules, offering hidden scenarios going beyond their normal ordinary perception, proposing new types of space and relation.

STUDIO#07 – ILLEGAL wants to investigate the existence of different ways do make architecture and consequent alternative processes of urban reality transformation.

The magazine is looking for contributors for their September issue. All submissions should be made via email to: studiomagazine@rrcstudio.com by August 25th (abstract is due July 20th).

Disaster Relief Housing For The Next “Superstorm”

Exterior Of The Relief Housing Units. Image Courtesy of GOTHAMIST / JAKE DOBKIN

With hurricanes Sandy and Katrina etched into recent memory, the need for post-disaster relief housing is now. New York City and Garrison Architects have developed a modular, prefabricated housing system to relieve displaced citizens during the next “superstorm.” At only 40′ by 100′ long, they can squeeze into the city’s smallest corners – all while having kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and storage spaces. The prototype is on display in Brooklyn – but you can see the entire design at the A/N Blog.

Happy Birthday Robert Venturi

© Denise Scott Brown

, the architect famous for “less is a bore,” turns 89 today. Venturi started his firm in 1964 and ran it with his wife and partner Denise Scott Brown from 1967 until 2012. Today the Pritzker Prize winner’s legacy lives on as the firm continues under the name VSBA (Venturi Scott Brown Associates).

The co-author of Learning From Las Vegas and Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, Venturi is one of the most recognized postmodern theorists of the 20th century. Today, as Robert Venturi turns 89, take a look at a few of his famous works on ArchDaily. Also, make sure to read his invaluable thoughts, opinions and theories on the architectural profession, which still have significance today.

Fernando Guerra’s Stunning Images of Álvaro Siza’s Most Inspiring Works

Alvaro Siza. Image © |

Today, the renowned Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza turns 81. To celebrate, we’ve rounded-up some of Siza’s most inspiring works, all courtesy of Fernando Guerra and Sergio Guerra – FG + SG.

Siza was born in Matosinhos, Portugal, in 1933. His first work was built in 1954, before Siza had even completed his studies at the School of Fine Arts at the University of Porto (now Faculty of Architecture, University of Porto – FAUP).

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Happy Birthday Álvaro Siza

Photo via Roaming By Design - http://roamingbydesign.com/

Today marks the 81st birthday of Portuguese modernist Álvaro Siza. Originally slated to become a sculptor, Siza’s switch-over to architecture took place early in his career, after experiencing the work of Antoni Gaudí (whose birthday he shares). Since then, he has risen to become one of the most respected architects of the era, winning the Pritzker Prize in 1992.  

Siza, whose work is recognized for its sculptural quality and “deceptive simplicity,” is possibly most well-known for his Leça Swimming Pools, built in the 1960s. To celebrate, we invite you to check out our AD original doodle (below) and revisit Siza’s classic works here on ArchDaily.

Zaha Hadid Officially Signed Up For Iraq Parliament Job

The now abandoned competition-winning design by . The Iraqi Council of Representatives has come under fire for not releasing details of Hadid’s design. Image ©

Zaha Hadid has now officially signed a deal to design the Iraq Parliament building in Baghdad, despite only coming third in the original design competition. BD Online reports that Hadid attended a signing ceremony held at the Iraqi Embassy in London last month, finally bringing a close to the controversial process.

The original competition run by the Royal Institute of British Architects at the request of the Iraqi Government was won by Assemblage, however shortly after the win it became apparent that the Iraqi Council of Representatives had other ideas, as they remained in discussion with Hadid’s Practice. Under the rules of the competition, the client is under no obligation to follow through with the winning design.

More on the controversy after the break

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A Gaudí Guide to Barcelona

Parc Guell. Image Courtesy of http://www.lowcostholidays.com/

Although already an icon in architectural circles, “birthday boy” may soon be receiving a new accolade: sainthood. Due to his renowned, unique style and tireless efforts on La Sagrada Família, Gaudi, potentially our first Patron Saint of Architects, will be beatified by Pope Francis within the next year.

Although beatification is only the third of four steps towards full-fledged canonization (which will require proof that Gaudí performed at least one miracle), it still seems a good moment to celebrate Gaudí and explore some of his most astounding works scattered throughout the city of Barcelona (seven of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites). Discover some of our favourites after the break.

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Leading Architects Come Together for London’s Summer Exhibition

The Architecture Room. Image Courtesy of Royal Academy of Arts

The Royal Academy of Arts’ annual Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission exhibition providing “a unique platform for emerging and established artists to showcase their works to an international audience.” From 12,000 total works of art, spanning a complete range of disciplines, 140 architectural works have been selected and hung by Royal Academician and Architect Eric Parry, after some early dialogue with former RIBA President Sir Richard MacCormac. Work featured this year includes a model by Thomas Heatherwick and prints by Louisa Hutton of Sauerbruch Hutton, alongside Norman Foster, Zaha Hadid, Nicholas Grimshaw, Richard Rogers and Eva Jiřičná.

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Happy Birthday Antoni Gaudí!

La Sagrada Familia’s passion facade. Image Courtesy of Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

Antoni Gaudí (1852 – 1926), the Catalán architect known for his distinctive, fantastical style, and – of course – for his magnum opus, the unfinished Sagrada Família, would have turned 162 today. Heavily influenced by religion and the forms, patterns, and colors found in nature, his work was a precursor to building technology development in the 20th century.

In the Sagrada Família, Gaudí eliminated the need for flying buttresses by developing an ingenious system of angled columns and hyperboloidal vaults. The use of hyperboloids and other complex shapes with ruled surfaces allowed not only for a structure far more delicate than its contemporaries, but also for enhanced acoustic and light quality.

In honor of Gaudí’s birthday, check out some of his other iconic contributions to architecture below.

Smiljan Radic’s Serpentine Pavilion Opens

© 2014 Iwan Baan

UPDATE: Check out video from today’s press conference at the Serpentine Pavilion! 

The 2014 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Chilean architect Smiljan Radic, opened this morning in London‘s Hyde Park. The pavilion, a glass-fibre reinforced plastic shell resting on large quarry stones, was inspired by a papier mâché model which Radic created four years ago as a response to the Oscar Wilde story ‘The Selfish Giant‘.

© Daniel Portilla

More images after the break

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2014 MASterworks Awards for Design Excellence in NYC

BRIC Arts Media House & Urban Glass/ LEESER Architecture. Image Courtesy of NYC

The Municipal Art Society (MAS) of New York announced their list of honorees for the 2014 MASterworks last week.  These annual are dedicated to buildings, completed the year previously in the city of New York, that exemplify a high standard of design, and make a significant contribution to the city’s urban environment.  This year, all of these projects are located outside of the city center and cover a wide range of programming, from an African-American heritage museum, to a pencil factory addition.

Vin Cipolla, president of MAS said that “the 2014 MASterworks winners strike a great balance between groundbreaking design and historic preservation. We are thrilled that all the winners this year are in the outer boroughs, proving that design excellence is happening throughout the city.”  See the full list of winners here, or take a look at the five major category winners after the break!

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Inside Russia’s “Fair Enough” – Special Mention Winner at the Venice Biennale 2014

The Russian Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale is selling the most important architectural ideas from . Curators Anton Kalgaev, Brendan Mcgetrick, and Daria Paramonova selected twenty ideas that offer solutions to contemporary architectural issues and designed the pavilion as a commercial fair. It’s even got generic furniture and salespeople manning the booths.

They talked to us about their project Fair Enough and why their contribution to the Biennale is a market where Russia’s originally socialist ideas are sold as updated “products.”

Check out the full curatorial statement, flip through the 160-page pavilion catalog, and see a full gallery of images after the break.

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