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Window: The Latest Architecture and News

23 Beautiful Ways to Save Space With Sliding Doors

11:00 - 26 August, 2018
23 Beautiful Ways to Save Space With Sliding Doors, © Amit Geron
© Amit Geron

With a clean and elegant appearance, sliding doors improve the lighting and ventilation of a space.

They also provide several advantages when it comes to design: they frame stunning views and emphasize nature. On the other hand, when using them as an enclosure it is possible to generate a greater fluidity between the interior and exterior spaces, creating an illusion of a larger space.

If you are looking for ideas on how to incorporate sliding doors into your project, keep reading on for 23 impressive examples.

André Vicente Gonçalves Documents Hundreds of Doors and Windows Around the World

06:00 - 24 March, 2016

Photographer André Vicente Gonçalves has revealed his latest project, “Doors of the World,” documenting hundreds of doors from cities around the world. Gonçalves has previously produced a photo series of hundreds of windows internationally titled “Windows of the World,” citing his interest in the way that such a small element of architecture expresses so much about its inhabitants and the human sense of security.

These Glass Walls Slide Around Corners to Disappear From View

16:30 - 2 December, 2015

One of the most popular tropes of Modernist architecture was the goal of dissolving the external boundaries of the home, connecting residents to nature through the use of large glass walls in order to "bring the outside in." Nowhere was this project more thoroughly realized than in Mies van der Rohe's 1930 Villa Tugendhat, where an entire side of the glass-walled living space could, if the user wished, be dropped through the floor and the house become open to the elements. Elegant though it was (especially in 1930), Mies' solution didn't catch on, limited by the fact that it required an electric motor and a basement below in which to store the disappeared facade.

These days, while countless houses incorporate glass walls that fold, slide, or swing open, few offer the bravura of Mies' design, choosing to move the glass off to the side rather than making it disappear entirely. This year though, window and door manufacturer Vitrocsa may have turned a corner in the provision of vanishing glass walls with its "Turnable" system.

Seminar: Achieve Energy Efficiency via Window Covering Items

02:30 - 16 September, 2015
Seminar: Achieve Energy Efficiency via Window Covering Items, Seminar held in Grand Decor, Nagoya, Japan
Seminar held in Grand Decor, Nagoya, Japan

A seminar on insulation effectiveness of various window covering products such as curtains, aluminium blinds, pleated screen shade and honeycomb blind. The seminar will take place on September 18th, 2015 from 2pm to 4:30pm at Cotton Fields コットンフィールズ located at 宮城県仙台市泉区南中山2-42-1.

Light Matters: Learning From Vernacular Windows

09:30 - 9 April, 2015
Light Matters: Learning From Vernacular Windows, Window in Osaka, Japan. Image © VELUX Group
Window in Osaka, Japan. Image © VELUX Group

Before computer daylight simulations were used to optimize the atmosphere and energy in buildings, generations of builders developed simple principles to create the best windows for their site. Two lighting experts have studied these traditional openings in buildings to find inspiration for more sustainable designs today. Francesco Anselmo, a lighting designer at Arup, and John Mardaljevic, Professor of Building Daylight Modelling at the School of Civil & Building Engineering of Loughborough University, have analysed the sun and skylight variations from northern regions like Stockholm down to the equator in cities like Haiti or Abu Dhabi.

Read on to learn more about the variety of traditional windows.

Window in Rome, Italy. Image © VELUX Group Window in Stockholm, Sweden. Image © VELUX Group Window in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Image © VELUX Group Window in London, Great Britain. Image © VELUX Group + 7

The Windows of New York and São Paulo

00:00 - 18 October, 2014
New York City-based graphic designer José Guizar’s captures the city’s eclectic array of windows through his weekly illustrations. Image Courtesy of José Guizar
New York City-based graphic designer José Guizar’s captures the city’s eclectic array of windows through his weekly illustrations. Image Courtesy of José Guizar

A little over a year ago, New York City-based graphic designer José Guizar started illustrating an obsession of his that had quickly grown since moving into the city: New York’s varied and eclectic windows. “A product of countless steps of journey through the city streets, this is a collection of windows that somehow have caught my restless eye out from the never-ending buzz of the city,” Guizar writes on his website. “This project is part an ode to architecture and part a self-challenge to never stop looking up.”

Others have since been inspired by Guizar’s colorful and captivating homage to the windows of NYC, and earlier this year São Paulo-based Nara Rosetto began her own weekly illustrations of windows in South America’s largest city.

Ranging from Victorian and porthole windows to windows with security bars, planting boxes and the occasional cat, the windows are as varied as the cities and buildings they occupy. 

Read on after the break for a journey through the windows of New York and São Paulo.

Could a Window Office Help You Sleep Better?

00:00 - 9 August, 2014
Could a Window Office Help You Sleep Better?, Generous office windows such as in The Lantern by zigzag architecture might actually help you sleep at night. Image © Julien Lanoo
Generous office windows such as in The Lantern by zigzag architecture might actually help you sleep at night. Image © Julien Lanoo

Having an office with a view may be more than just a symbol of seniority. New findings show that there are public health benefits associated with working by a window, Fast Co Design reports. An interdisciplinary group of architects and medical researchers compared workers exposed to natural light with those who aren’t, and found that window workers sleep, on average, 46 minutes more a night. They also scored better on self-report health and sleep surveys. Learn more about the study in the full article, “Workers in Windowless Offices Lose 46 Minutes of Sleep a Night,” at Fast Co Design and start convincing your boss that it’s time you had a window office!

A Brief History of the Windowless House

00:00 - 5 March, 2014
A Brief History of the Windowless House, The Vertical Glass House (2013), built at the West Bund Biennale of Architecture and Contemporary Art, Shanghai. Image Courtesy of Atelier FCJZ
The Vertical Glass House (2013), built at the West Bund Biennale of Architecture and Contemporary Art, Shanghai. Image Courtesy of Atelier FCJZ

In this article, originally published by Metropolis as "Houses Without Windows: Meditative Respites or Architectural Straightjackets?", Komal Sharma looks into the architectural oddity that is the completely enclosed house. While many would shudder at the idea, there is a rich history of houses which, in exceptional circumstances and with exceptional clients, make sense without windows.

The Vertical Glass House by Chinese architects Atelier FCJZ is disingenuous to say the least. Its name suggests a vertical derivative of Philip Johnson's canonical house, and in fact its architects describe it as a 90-degree rotation of the typical modernist glass house. Instead, what welcomes visitors at Shanghai's Xuhui waterfront is a four-story concrete house without any windows. Where is all that promised glass, you might ask?

The answer is inside. The house's textured concrete walls give it the appearance of a bunker, but the interiors are actually light-filled. The architects accomplish this through an inverted sense of space. Where one expects walls of glass, yielding a platonic prism that brazenly exposes inhabitants to the outside world, the house instead delivers a surprising twist: the 7-cm-thick floor slabs are completely transparent, endowing users with a Superman-like sense of see-through vision. The experience of looking up through all of the house's spaces, even the most private spaces like the bathroom, is breathtakingly novel.

Read on for more about the phenomenon of window-less houses

The Leiria House (2010) appears as a ghostly reflection of the quintessential home. Image © FG+SG The U-House by Toyo Ito (1976). Image © Koji Taki The interior structure of the Vertical Glass House divides the floor area into four quadrants. Image Courtesy of Atelier FCJZ The source of illumination for the Ryunsenji House (2008) in Japan, is a light well on the roof. Image Courtesy of Uno Tomoaki + 8

SOILED: Windowscrapers / CARTOGRAM Architecture + Urban Design

00:00 - 13 October, 2013
SOILED: Windowscrapers / CARTOGRAM Architecture + Urban Design, Courtesy of CARTOGRAM architecture and urban design
Courtesy of CARTOGRAM architecture and urban design

Exploring the intersections of architecture, urbanism, and the world beneath our feet, SOILED is a journal that serves as a space for investigative discussion. The publication toes the line between serious and not-too-serious, aiming to instigate mischief and a close examination of the quotidian. Published by CARTOGRAM Architecture and Urban Design, the semi-annual journal has just released its fourth edition, Windowscrapers.