AD Classics: New York State Pavilion / Philip Johnson

rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock.com

It is rare to find an architectural project whose history makes such strange bedfellows as the State Pavilion: a master architect and millions of patrons, roller skaters and rock stars, stray cats and Iron Man [1]. For three hours on April 22, in honor of the fifty year anniversary of the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the city of Queens will open the long shuttered gates to Philip Johnson’s most futuristic work. 

Infographic: The Bauhaus, Where Form Follows Function

UPDATE: In honor of the 81st anniversary of the day the closed in 1933, we’re re-publishing this popular infographic, which was originally published April 16th, 2012.

From the “starchitect” to “architecture for the 99%,” we are witnessing a shift of focus in the field of architecture. However, it’s in the education system where these ideas really take root and grow. This sea change inspired us to explore past movements, influenced by economic shifts, war and the introduction of new technologies, and take a closer look at the bauhaus movement.

Often associated with being anti-industrial, the Arts and Crafts Movement had dominated the field before the start of the Bauhaus in 1919. The Bauhaus’ focus was to merge design with industry, providing well designed products for the many.

The Bauhaus not only impacted design and architecture on an international level, but also revolutionized the way design schools conceptualize education as a means of imparting an integrated design approach where form follows function.

AD Classics: Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute / Philip Johnson

© Ezra Stoller/Esto

The Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute is a Modern masterpiece and revolutionary precedent of American museum design.  Located in Utica, New York, it was the first of many influential cultural facilities designed by Philip Johnson.  Also known as the Museum of Art, the structure represents a stylistic turning point in Johnson’s career, marking the end of his loyalty to the International Style and the beginning of his experimentation with Neo-Classicism.

AD Classics: PPG Place / John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson

via Wikipedia Commons

The design of PPG Place, by Philip Johnson and , melds the notion of the modern corporate tower with a neo-gothic monument. Clad in almost a million square feet of glass manufactured by the anchor tenant PPG industries, the architects ingeniously rethought accepted practices in curtain wall design to create “the crown jewel in ’s skyline.” (1)  The 1.57 million square foot complex was one in a series of high profile corporate projects completed during Johnson’s controversial foray into postmodernism.

Philip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral Born Again

© Flickr CC User Amir Nejad

Johnson Fain and Rios Clementi Hale Studios have been selected to transform ’s 1981 Crystal Cathedral, originally a Protestant mega-church, to make it more in keeping with its new, Catholic identity.

The Cathedral, which had filed for bankruptcy in October 2010, was bought in early 2012 by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange. Earlier this month, the architects were chosen for the renovation: Johnson Fain will focus on the interior, while will oversee the masterplan of its 34-acre campus.

AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art

View of the gallery complex from the Sculpture Garden. Image © Timothy Hursley

The entrance to the Museum of Modern Art is tucked beneath a demure facade of granite and glass in Midtown Manhattan. Its clean, regular planes mark Yoshio Taniguchi’s 2004 addition to the MoMA’s sequence of facades, which he preserved as a record of its form. Taniguchi’s contribution sits beside the 1984 residential tower by Cesar Pelli and Associates, followed by Philip Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone’s original 1939 building, then Philip Johnson’s 1964 addition. Taniguchi was hired in 1997 to expand the Museum’s space and synthesize its disparate elements. His elegant, minimal solution presents a contemporary face for the MoMA while adhering to its Modernist roots.

Sou Fujimoto Designs New Wing for Germany’s Kunsthalle Bielefeld

First Proposal: Stacked Landscape. Image © Architects

Sou Fujimoto has unveiled three design proposals for an extension to ’s Kunsthalle Bielefeld in Germany. Since its completion in 1968, the museum has built a reputation for hosting temporary exhibitions. However, with the construction of the new wing, Kunsthalle Bielefeld will expand their services to accommodate a contemporary art gallery.

Read on to review Sou Fujimoto’s three proposals…

AD Round Up: Unbuilt Classics

The Plug-In City by Peter Cook, 1964. Image via Archigram Archives

This AD Round Up is dedicated to unbuilt classics, a selection of projects and ideas that, although never built, contributed greatly to the canon of twentieth century architecture. In 1920, Buckminister Fuller designed the Dymaxion House, which displayed forward-thinking innovations in sustainability and prefabrication. In 1924, Le Corbusier’s radical plan for Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City) had an extensive influence upon modern urban planning and led to the development of new high-density housing typologies. In the same year Friedrick Kiesler introduced his “Endless House“, the basis for his subsequent manifesto of Correalism. Eight years later in 1932, Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock curated the “Modern Architecture: International exhibition” at the , introducing the emerging and laying the principles for Modern architecture. And finally, one of Archigram’s most famous utopian visions, the Plug-In City, proposed by Peter Cook in 1964, offered a fascinating new approach to urbanism and reversed traditional perceptions of infrastructure’s role in the city.

AD Classics: Modern Architecture International Exhibition / Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock

Model of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye from Modern Architecture: International Exhibition [ Exh. #15, February 9-March 23, 1932
“Modern Architecture: International Exhibition” is the title of an exhibition that took place in 1932 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Curated by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock, the exhibition introduced an emerging architectural style characterized by simplified geometry and a lack of ornamentation; known as  the “International Style,” it was described by Johnson as “probably the first fundamentally original and widely distributed style since the Gothic.” The exhibition, along with an accompanying catalogue, laid the principles for the canon of Modern architecture.

AD Classics: Soreq Nuclear Research Center / Philip Johnson

and Gideon Ziv, Sorek Nuclear Research Center, Israel, 1956-9 (from: Zvi Efrat, The Israeli Project: Building and Architecture 1948-1973)

American architect and Prizker Prize winner Philip Johnson – who would have turned 107 today – is well known for his contributions to 20th century architecture, from the modernist Glass House in 1949 to his later infamous post modernist AT&T building in 1984. But did you know that Johnson designed a brutalistic nuclear plant in Israel? More on this monolithic structure after the break…

Happy 107th birthday Philip Johnson!

Philip Johnson by David La Chapelle. © LaChapelle Studio

Today, July 8th, is Philip Johnson‘s Birthday! (1906-2005)

The recipient of the very first Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979 and the American Institute of Architects’ Gold Medal, Johnson was described by Pritzker jurors as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment. As a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” In 1932, along with Henry-Russell Hitchcock, he curated the Modern Architecture: International held at the Museum of Modern Art – at that moment, “The ” was born, and the course of modern architecture forever altered.

As we did last year, ArchDaily is celebrating with a special Glass House logo. Inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, The Glass House, with its perfect proportions and its simplicity, is still considered a modern marvel.

Learn more about Philip Johnsons’s work after the break…

AD Round Up: Iconic Houses in America

© Robert Ruschak – Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

Five great architects, five great houses. This 4th of July, take a look at five of the most iconic houses in the . The main image is of a house that redefined the relationship between man, architecture and nature — Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater House. If you’re searching for the meaning of less is more, you must check out the Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House or The Glass House by Philip Johnson. You should also check out one of the first built examples of Postmodern architecture, The Vanna Venturi House by . Finally, revisit Frank Gehry’s Norton House, known for its eccentric form and eclectic materiality. Which one is your favorite?

The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”

The Glass House just concluded their second annual Conversations in Context, which presents visitors with the opportunity to join in a weekly evening tour and intimate conversation with industry leaders, including , Michael Graves, and more.

Since the 1940s, The Glass House has served as a place of inspiration, education and conversation across creative disciplines. Its 49-acre landscape, 14 architectural structures and world-class art collection continue to draw members of an international creative community to participate in its rich story. Conversations in Context continues Philip Johnson’s legacy of using the Glass House as a place to conduct ongoing seminars with architecture students and present emerging and established architects the opportunity to discuss the current state of the industry.

The video above features Architect, critic, and historian Kenneth Frampton, along with Dean Mark Wigley from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and . Follow us after the break for a few of our favorite conversations from this year’s series.

NYU Bobst Library Renovation / Joel Sanders Architect

©

As reported by David W Dunlap for the NYTimes, the safety-restoration applied to Philip Johnson and ’s Elmer Holmes Bobst Library on the NYU campus near Washington Square is close to completion.   While the library, which was constructed in the early 1970s, remains intact, the tremendous atrium space – a soaring 150 ft void – is proving to be more of a safety hazard than the magnificent architectural experience the architects intended.  Since 2003, the library has been marred by claiming the lives of three students who leaped to their deaths (even after the university installed 8ft polycarbonate barriers).   Charged with the task of eliminating the possibility for such a future occurrence, Joel Sanders Architect responded with a perforated alumium screen that completely walls off the atrium from the library’s levels.

More after the break.  

Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island

The relationship between social dynamics and architecture has always been intimate.  It is a constant dialogue between social norms and politics, stylistic trends and aesthetic choices, individual preferences and the collective good.  The Modernist Period was a time when architecture took on the challenge of many social problems.  In all the arts –  architecture, design, music and film – the period was highly politicized and the choices often gave way to a utilitarian ideal that was a hybrid of efficiency, simplicity and comfort.  Jake Gorst’s new film Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island, supported by Design Onscreen, is a message of preservation that takes us through the history of the modernist housing boom that took place on Long Island, NY in the period between the Great Depression and the 1970s.

On August 14th, Cook+Fox Architects hosted a private film screening at their office on 641 Ave of the Americas, presenting the treasures along the island’s shore that have fallen between the cracks of history.  The film looks at works from , Wallace Harrison, , Marcel Breuer, Philip Johnson, Charles Gwathmey, Barbara and Julian Neski and many others.

Follow us after the break to catch up on the history of the development of these houses on Long Island.

Happy Birthday Philip Johnson! (1906-2005)

From left: Andy Warhol, David Whitney, Philip Johnson, Dr. John Dalton, and Robert A. M. Stern in in 1964. Photography by David McCabe

Today, July 8th, is Philip Johnson‘s Birthday! (1906-2005)

The recipient of the very first Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979 and the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal, Johnson has been labeled by Prtizker jurors as someone “whose work demonstrates a combination of the qualities of talent, vision and commitment that has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment. As a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.”

On what would be his 106th birthday, ArchDaily celebrates with a special Glass House logo:

Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1997, The Glass House is still considered a modern marvel. Inspired by ’s Farnsworth House, the Glass House by Johnson, with its perfect proportions and its simplicity, is one of the first most brilliant works of modern architecture. Johnson built the 47-acre estate for himself in New Canaan, Connecticut.

 

© Creative Commons – Photo Credit: Melody Kramer

The house was the first of fourteen structures that the architect built on the property over a span of fifty years.

© Wikimedia Commons / Quique Huertas

Another iconic building designed by Philip Johnson, together with John Burgee, is the Puerta de Europa in Madrid, two leaning towers that have become an icon of the Spanish capital.

Films & Architecture: “My Architect”

This week we will propose the first documentary of the list within our section of Films & Architecture. There is not much to say about the figure of Kahn, since it has been worldwide recognized. Nevertheless this is a film that captures in a magnificent way the greatness of Kahn’s work through his son’s journey. I guess everyone related somehow with architecture will feel touched by this extraordinary recording. Let us know in the comments what is (or was) your experience watching the film.

Iconic Houses by Grant Snider

© Grant Snider, 2012

Curbed lead us to Colorado-based webcomic Grant Snider and his clever blog Incidental Comics. Snider uses the classic “glass houses” proverb in his own unique depiction of midcentury “Iconic Houses”, highlighting The Glass House by Philip Johnson, Farnsworth House by Mies Van der Rohe, Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier and Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Curious about the red beavers gnawing at the Farnsworth House? Snider clears up the confusion stating, “In an earlier draft of this comic, it appeared the Farnsworth house was being gnawed by ordinary beavers. My architect brother informed me that Mies van der Rohe was known for his innovations in steel and glass, not wood. So just to clarify: those are MUTANT beavers.”