Video: Artist Animates 5 Iconic Modern Homes

Five of history’s most iconic modern houses are re-created as illustrations in this two-minute video created by Matteo Muci. Set to the tune of cleverly timed, light-hearted music, the animation constructs the houses piece-by-piece on playful pastel backgrounds. The five homes featured in the short but sweet video are Le Courbusier’s Villa Savoye, Gerrit Rietveld’s Rietveld Schröder House, Ludwig ’s Farnsworth House, Philip Johnson’s Glass House and ’s Fallingwater.

Happy Birthday Philip Johnson

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons User B. Pietro Filardo

Today, the recipient of the very first Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979 and the American Institute of Architects’ Gold Medal, Philip Johnson (1906-2005), would have turned 108.

Johnson was described by Pritzker jurors as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment. As a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” In 1932, along with Henry-Russell Hitchcock, he curated the Modern Architecture: International Exhibition held at the Museum of Modern Art - at that moment, “The International Style” was born, and the course of modern architecture forever altered.

Johnson’s work was not limited to modernism, and in 1984 he designed the iconic AT&T building in New York (today the Sony Building), a 197 meter tall postmodernist sky scraper. The building became infamous for its ornamental style and resemblance to Michael Grave’s Humana building. Another iconic building designed by Philip Johnson, together with , is the Puerta de Europa in Madrid, two leaning towers that have become an icon of the Spanish capital.

As we did for the last few years, ArchDaily is celebrating with a special Glass House logo. Inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, The Glass House, with its perfect proportions and its simplicity, is still considered a modern marvel. Check out more by Philip Johnson on ArchDaily, after the break.

Light Matters: Creating Walls of Light

Uniform wallwashing at 171 Collins Street, Melbourne. Architects: Bates Smart Architects. Lighting design: Electrolight, www.electrolight.com.au. Image © Dean Bradley

induced a shift in lighting away from luminaires and towards invisible light sources that render spaces in a purer (forgive the pun) light. For the first time, lit walls were used to define rooms and to structure architecture. Today I’d like to explore early prototypes – including Philip Johnson’s Brick House and the Seagram Building – and discuss how their lighting techniques continue to influence architecture today. 

The World’s Fair New York State Pavilion to Be Digitally Preserved

CyArk And The Plan To Digitally Preserve The 1964 World’s Fair State Pavilion. Image © Marco Catini

If you haven’t heard of CyArk yet, make sure to check out their recent Kickstarter project. The not-for-profit company digitally preserves some of the world’s most important sites: including Easter Island, Mt. Rushmore and The Pantheon, to name a few. Now the group is headed to New York to preserve Philip Johnson and Lev Zetlin’s 1964 World’s Fair New York State Pavilion. Since the fair ended, the pavilion has fallen into disrepair and been heavily vandalized. With assistance from the University of Central Florida, they plan to release the digitally preserved 3D files to the public, for free. To help preserve this “National Treasure,” check out their Kickstarter page.

Artist Fujiko Nakaya Shrouds Philip Johnson’s Glass House in Fog

© Richard Barnes

Celebrating the 65th anniversary of Philip Johnson‘s iconic Glass House, artist Fujiko Nakaya has created the building’s first ever site-specific art . The , titled “Veil”, will shroud the glass house in fog for 10 minutes every hour, creating a dialogue with Johnson’s design intentions by breaking the visual connection between inside and out, and covering the building’s sharp, clean lines with misty indeterminacy. At the same time it will make literal Johnson’s ideal of an architecture that vanishes.

Read after the break for more information and images

Light Matters: Richard Kelly, The Unsung Master Behind Modern Architecture’s Greatest Buildings

Seagram Building, New York.

Richard Kelly illuminated some of the twentieth century’s most iconic buildings: , Seagram Building and Kimbell Art Museum, to name a few. His design strategy was surprisingly simple, but extremely successful.

for architecture has been and still often is dominated by an engineering viewpoint, resigned to determining sufficient illuminance levels for a safe and efficient working environment. With a background in stage , Kelly introduced a scenographic perspective for architectural . His point of view might look self-evident to today’s architectural community, but it was revolutionary for his time and has strongly influenced modern architecture.

Read more about Richard Kelly’s remarkable, and unsung, contribution to architecutre, after the break.

The Trust Declares Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion a “National Treasure”

rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock.com

Philip Johnson’s “iconic” New York State Pavilion has been listed as a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic . This designation, which was announced today at the 1964-65 World’s Fair’s 50th anniversary celebration in , declares the pavilion a “historically, culturally and architecturally important site” and will help raise awareness and funding for its preservation. It is now one of just 44 national sites bearing this recognition.

“In the last 50 years, Flushing Meadows Corona Park has grown from the site of the World’s Fair to the home of the World’s Park,” said Queens Parks Commissioner Dorothy Lewandowski. “As we celebrate this anniversary, it is just as important that we look to the next 50 years and plan for the Park’s future. I would like to thank the National Trust for Historic Preservation for honoring the New York State Pavilion as a ‘National Treasure’. This designation will highlight the importance of the Pavilion as a national icon, and help us to continue the conversation about how it can best serve Queens’ residents.”

Tour Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion Tomorrow

For the first time in decades, Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion will open to the public tomorrow (April 22) in celebration of its 50th anniversary. Built for the 1964-65 World’s Fair, “the Pavilion represents a pivotal time in American history when the allure of putting a man on the moon inspired renowned architect Philip Johnson to create this emblem for Space Age enthusiasm,” described Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

AD Classics: New York State Pavilion / Philip Johnson

rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock.com

It is rare to find an architectural project whose history makes such strange bedfellows as the New York State Pavilion: a master architect and millions of patrons, roller skaters and rock stars, stray cats and Iron Man [1]. For three hours on April 22, in honor of the fifty year anniversary of the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the city of will open the long shuttered gates to Philip Johnson’s most futuristic work.

Infographic: The Bauhaus, Where Form Follows Function

UPDATE: In honor of the 81st anniversary of the day the closed in 1933, we’re re-publishing this popular infographic, which was originally published April 16th, 2012.

From the “starchitect” to “architecture for the 99%,” we are witnessing a shift of focus in the field of architecture. However, it’s in the education system where these ideas really take root and grow. This sea change inspired us to explore past movements, influenced by economic shifts, war and the introduction of new technologies, and take a closer look at the bauhaus movement.

Often associated with being anti-industrial, the Arts and Crafts Movement had dominated the field before the start of the Bauhaus in 1919. The Bauhaus’ focus was to merge design with industry, providing well designed products for the many.

The Bauhaus not only impacted design and architecture on an international level, but also revolutionized the way design schools conceptualize education as a means of imparting an integrated design approach where form follows function.

AD Classics: Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute / Philip Johnson

© Ezra Stoller/Esto

The Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute is a Modern masterpiece and revolutionary precedent of American museum design.  Located in Utica, New York, it was the first of many influential cultural facilities designed by Philip Johnson.  Also known as the Museum of Art, the structure represents a stylistic turning point in Johnson’s career, marking the end of his loyalty to the International Style and the beginning of his experimentation with Neo-Classicism.

AD Classics: PPG Place / John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson

via Wikipedia Commons

The design of PPG Place, by Philip Johnson and John Burgee, melds the notion of the modern corporate tower with a neo-gothic monument. Clad in almost a million square feet of glass manufactured by the anchor tenant PPG industries, the architects ingeniously rethought accepted practices in curtain design to create “the crown jewel in Pittsburgh’s skyline.” (1)  The 1.57 million square foot complex was one in a series of high profile corporate projects completed during Johnson’s controversial foray into postmodernism.

AD Classics: The Crystal Cathedral / Philip Johnson

© Flickr user Amir Nejad

The Crystal Cathedral was designed as a religious theater of sorts, acting as both television studio and stage to a congregation of 3,000. It was commissioned by renowned televangelist Robert Schuller and completed in 1980 near Los Angeles, California. Philip Johnson and John Burgee devised the enclosure in response to Schuller’s request that the church be open to the “sky and the surrounding world.” 

Philip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral Born Again

© Flickr CC User Amir Nejad

Johnson Fain and Rios Clementi Hale Studios have been selected to transform Philip Johnson’s 1981 Crystal Cathedral, originally a Protestant mega-church, to make it more in keeping with its new, Catholic identity.

The Cathedral, which had filed for bankruptcy in October 2010, was bought in early 2012 by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange. Earlier this month, the architects were chosen for the : Johnson Fain will focus on the interior, while will oversee the masterplan of its 34-acre campus.

AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art

View of the gallery complex from the Sculpture Garden. Image © Timothy Hursley

The entrance to the Museum of Modern Art is tucked beneath a demure facade of granite and in Midtown Manhattan. Its clean, regular planes mark Yoshio Taniguchi’s 2004 addition to the MoMA’s sequence of facades, which he preserved as a record of its form. Taniguchi’s contribution sits beside the 1984 residential tower by Cesar Pelli and Associates, followed by and Edward Durell Stone’s original 1939 building, then Philip Johnson’s 1964 addition. Taniguchi was hired in 1997 to expand the Museum’s space and synthesize its disparate elements. His elegant, minimal solution presents a contemporary face for the MoMA while adhering to its Modernist roots.

Sou Fujimoto Designs New Wing for Germany’s Kunsthalle Bielefeld

First Proposal: Stacked Landscape. Image © Sou Fujimoto Architects

Sou Fujimoto has unveiled three design proposals for an extension to Philip Johnson’s in . Since its completion in 1968, the museum has built a reputation for hosting temporary exhibitions. However, with the construction of the new wing, Kunsthalle Bielefeld will expand their services to accommodate a contemporary art gallery.

Read on to review Sou Fujimoto’s three proposals…

AD Round Up: Unbuilt Classics

The Plug-In City by Peter Cook, 1964. Image via Archives

This AD Round Up is dedicated to unbuilt classics, a selection of projects and ideas that, although never built, contributed greatly to the canon of twentieth century architecture. In 1920, Buckminister Fuller designed the Dymaxion House, which displayed forward-thinking innovations in sustainability and prefabrication. In 1924, Le Corbusier’s radical plan for Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City) had an extensive influence upon modern urban planning and led to the development of new high-density housing typologies. In the same year Friedrick Kiesler introduced his “Endless House“, the basis for his subsequent manifesto of Correalism. Eight years later in 1932, curated the “Modern Architecture: International exhibition” at the MoMA, introducing the emerging International Style and laying the principles for Modern architecture. And finally, one of Archigram’s most famous utopian visions, the Plug-In City, proposed by Peter Cook in 1964, offered a fascinating new approach to urbanism and reversed traditional perceptions of infrastructure’s role in the city.

AD Classics: Modern Architecture International Exhibition / Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock

Model of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye from Modern Architecture: International Exhibition [MoMA Exh. #15, February 9-March 23, 1932
“Modern Architecture: International Exhibition” is the title of an exhibition that took place in 1932 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Curated by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock, the exhibition introduced an emerging architectural style characterized by simplified geometry and a lack of ornamentation; known as  the “,” it was described by Johnson as “probably the first fundamentally original and widely distributed style since the Gothic.” The exhibition, along with an accompanying catalogue, laid the principles for the canon of Modern architecture.