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Bauhaus: The Latest Architecture and News

Open Call: Bauhaus Lab 2020 – A Concrete for the “Other Half”

The brick in the picture is being preserved as part of the archival holdings of the Canadian Centre for Architecture on the work of the Minimum Cost Housing Group (MCHG). Founded at the McGill University School of Architecture in the early 1970s with the goal of analysing “How the other half builds,” the MCHG focused on practices of building and dwelling in developing countries. The group’s research and project work, including experiments with sulphur concrete, were part of a paradigm shift in the discourse on the housing crises of the global South. Measures such as slum clearances and resettlement, often

Tel Aviv City Guide: 6 Bauhaus Buildings to See in the White City

When members of the Bauhaus school fled Germany, many of these talented visionaries made their way to Tel Aviv. At the time, the city was in its fledgling stages and served as the ideal blank canvas for this idealistic concept. Today, the city boasts over 4,000 Bauhaus buildings and has earned distinction as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site. Last year, for the 100th anniversary of Bauhaus, the city opened the White City Center in partnership with the German government to actively promote the preservation of this iconic architectural style. The White City Center hosts exhibitions where visitors can learn more about this iconic style. The Bauhaus Center is also worth a visit and hosts weekly guided tours on Fridays for a small fee. For those who are planning a visit here’s our list of the top six must-see Bauhaus buildings in Tel Aviv.

12 Important Modernist Styles Explained

Modernism could be described as one of the most optimistic styles in architectural history, drawing from notions of utopia, innovation, and the reimagination of how humans would live, work, and interact. As we reflected in our AD Essentials Guide to Modernism, the philosophy of Modernism still dominates much of architectural discourse today, even if the world that gave rise to Modernism has changed utterly.

As we say goodbye to 2019, a year that saw the centenary of the Bauhaus, we have collated a list of key architectural styles that defined Modernism in architecture. This tool for understanding the development of 20th-century design is complete with examples of each style, showcasing the practice of Modernism that lay behind the theory.

Café L’Aubette/ Theo van Doesburg. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Claude Truong-Ngoc Barcelona Pavilion / Mies van der Rohe. Image © Gili Merin Villa Savoye / Le Corbusier Vitra Design Museum / Gehry Partners. Image © Liao Yusheng + 13

Beyond Bauhaus - Modernism In Britain 1933 to 1966

The 1930s were a pivotal decade for British avantgarde architecture. Despite the relative paucity of modernist buildings being commissioned, by 1937 the country had, for a brief moment, become the epicentre of progressive contemporary architecture in Europe.

This exhibition revisits the impact of three notable Bauhaus émigrés: Walter Gropius, Marcel Breuer and László Moholy-Nagy. Centred on the brief period of 1934-37, when they came to live and work in Britain, it traces this fertile moment in British architectural history and considers where its legacy has had the most enduring impact.

Drawing on the RIBA’s unique and world-class collections, little known and rarely

New Book Tells the Forgotten Histories of Bauhaus Women

This article was originally published on Metropolismag.com.

The Bauhaus was founded on the promise of gender equality, but women Bauhauslers had to fight for recognition. A new book recounts the achievements and talents of 45 Bauhaus women.

After the end of World War I, a spirit of optimism and a euphoric mood prevailed in Germany. Thanks to a new republican government and women’s suffrage, the war-torn nation was experiencing a radical new beginning.

As part of that convention-breaking wave, in 1919 German architect Walter Gropius assumed leadership of what would become the legendary Bauhaus. Initially, he declared that there would be “absolute equality” among male and female students.

"Original Bauhaus" - The Centenary Exhibition

Marking the centenary of the Bauhaus’s founding, the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung’s exhibition at the Berlinische Galerie is presenting famous, familiar and forgotten Bauhaus originals and recounting the history behind the objects: Who is the woman sitting on the tubular-steel chair? Does the Haus am Horn have a secret twin? Why have the tea infusers which were created as prototypes for industrial production always remained one-of-a-kind pieces? The exhibition sheds light on how unique work and series, remake and original are inseparably linked in the history of the Bauhaus. Around 1,000 Bauhaus originals from the Bauhaus-Archiv’s collection will be on display,

Bauhaus Neue – Framing future of design education

PREMISE

There are moments in history when a confluence of ideas, people, and broader cultural and technological forces creates a spark. Sometimes the spark amounts to nothing more than a flicker. But if conditions are right, it can erupt into a dazzling, brilliant light that, while burning for only a brief moment, changes the world around it.

The Bauhaus was one of these – a place that despite the economic turmoil and cultural conservatism of the world around it, offered a truly radical, international and optimistic vision of the future. The origins of the Bauhaus lie in the late 19th century, in

Paul Klee's Bauhaus Notebook is Now Online

© Zentrum Paul Klee
© Zentrum Paul Klee

The Swiss-born artist Paul Klee lived between 1879 and 1940, and was a noted Bauhaus lecturer who experimented deeply in color theory. His vibrant, mechanical sketches which formed the basis for his Bauhaus teaching throughout the 1920s, have now been made freely accessible online after the Zentrum Paul Klee published almost all 3900 pages of his personal notebooks.

© Zentrum Paul Klee © Zentrum Paul Klee © Zentrum Paul Klee © Zentrum Paul Klee + 8

Spotlight: Walter Gropius

Bauhaus, 1925. Image ©  Thomas Lewandovski
Bauhaus, 1925. Image © Thomas Lewandovski

One of the most highly regarded architects of the 20th century, Walter Gropius (18 May 1883 – 5 July 1969) was one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and the founder of the Bauhaus, the German "School of Building" that embraced elements of art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography in its design, development and production.

LIONLION's Latest Music Video is Inspired by Bauhaus Architecture

LIONLION has released the music video for their latest song “Oceans Rise,” inspired by Bauhaus architecture. Coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the influential German school, the video offers a reduced, minimalistic design vocabulary set in the Pescher House by Richard Neutra.

"We Designed an Exhibition that Presents the Bauhaus in all its Dazzling Diversity": Barbara Holzer Explains her Design for the New Bauhaus Museum

On the weekend of the 5th-7th of April, the city of Weimar celebrated the opening of the recently-completed Bauhaus Museum, along with its permanent exhibition of the 100-year history of Bauhaus.

Located near the Neue Museum, the concrete structure was designed by German architect Prof. Heike Hanada. The architect followed the school’s minimalist approach, and developed a 5-storey cubic building, with a clearly defined geometric form and horizontal grooves all around the facade. The museum’s permanent exhibition, which was designed and curated by Barbara Holzer of Holzer Kobler Architekturen, houses the world’s oldest Bauhaus collection, bringing forth debates on contemporary design and showcasing the school’s most notable inventions.

In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily, Holzer explains the creative process of designing the exhibition space, and some of the challenges she faced while exhibiting Bauhaus' distinguished works.

Exhibition Space . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Stage . Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture Theodor Bogler, Stock Canc, 1923. Image © Vereinigung der Benediktiner to Maria Laach e.V. Mies van der Rohe. Image © Andrew Alberts / Heike Hanada Laboratory of Art and Architecture + 31

Infographic: The Bauhaus, Where Form Follows Function

UPDATE: In honor of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus, we’re re-publishing this popular infographic, which was originally published April 16th, 2012.

From the “starchitect” to “architecture for the 99%,” we are witnessing a shift of focus in the field of architecture. However, it’s in the education system where these ideas really take root and grow. This sea change inspired us to explore past movements, influenced by economic shifts, war and the introduction of new technologies, and take a closer look at the bauhaus movement.

Often associated with being anti-industrial, the Arts and Crafts Movement had dominated the field before the start of the Bauhaus in 1919. The Bauhaus’ focus was to merge design with industry, providing well-designed products for the many.

The Bauhaus not only impacted design and architecture on an international level, but also revolutionized the way design schools conceptualize education as a means of imparting an integrated design approach where form follows function.

Knoll Launches Bauhaus Exhibition Curated by OMA / Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli

As part of Milan’s Salone del Mobile, Knoll has presented an exhibition celebrating the centenary of the Bauhaus, curated and designed by OMA / Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli with Domitilla Dardi. The story, presented at Knoll’s showroom at Piazza Bertarlelli, is told by means of four clusters that encourage people to participate.

© OMA / Photography by Fred Ernst © OMA / Photography by Fred Ernst © OMA / Photography by Fred Ernst © OMA / Photography by Fred Ernst + 19

6 Schools That Defined Their Own Architectural Styles

Architectural education has always been fundamentally influenced by whichever styles are popular at a given time, but that relationship flows in the opposite direction as well. All styles must originate somewhere, after all, and revolutionary schools throughout centuries past have functioned as the influencers and generators of their own architectural movements. These schools, progressive in their times, are often founded by discontented experimental minds, looking for something not previously nor currently offered in architectural output or education. Instead, they forge their own way and bring their students along with them. As those students graduate and continue on to practice or become teachers themselves, the school’s influence spreads and a new movement is born.