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Gallery: Chinese Blue by Sebastian Weiss

08:00 - 25 May, 2019
Gallery: Chinese Blue by Sebastian Weiss, Galaxy SOHO / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Sebastian Weiss
Galaxy SOHO / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Sebastian Weiss

Name: Chinese Blue

Photographer: Sebastian Weiss

Location: Beijing

Year: September 2018

Bumps / SAKO Architects. Image © Sebastian Weiss CCTV Headquarters / OMA. Image © Sebastian Weiss National Centre for the Performing Arts / Paul Andreu. Image © Sebastian Weiss Mandarin Oriental / OMA. Image © Sebastian Weiss + 20

Why the EU Membership is Worth it According to Rem Koolhaas and Stephan Petermann

06:10 - 25 May, 2019

The EU costs you the same as Netflix - is it worth it? Rem Koolhaas thinks so.

The Petty Crimes of Architects

06:00 - 25 May, 2019
The Petty Crimes of Architects, Stealing Office Supplies. Image © Chanel Dehond
Stealing Office Supplies. Image © Chanel Dehond

Everyone is blameworthy for at least one bad habit / behavior at his/her workplace: talking on the phone too loudly, stealing someone else's mug, walking around the office with a very odorous lunch...

After a little reunion with her friends who work in the architecture field, illustrator Chanel Dehond couldn't help but notice a few "crimes" that almost all architects are guilty of.

Take a look at Dehond's illustrations of the petty crimes done by architects and designers.

15 Projects of Steel Stealing the Show

07:30 - 24 May, 2019
15 Projects of Steel Stealing the Show , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The use of steel in architecture is considered as one of the most innovative construction developments in history, allowing architects to create structures in scales they never thought they could. Fast-forward a few centuries, and steel remains as one of the most crucial materials in architecture. But there is a lot more to the material than just tensile strength and durability, some architects were well-aware of steel's potential and transformed it into lighting fixtures, facades, decorative elements, and finishes.

Here are 15 projects where architects looked beyond steel as structural support and explored its diverse possibilities in architecture.

© Ket Kolektif © Markus Hattwig © Juan Alberto Andrade © Edmon Leong + 16

João Luís Carrilho da Graça and the Power of Curiosity in Architecture

07:00 - 24 May, 2019
João Luís Carrilho da Graça and the Power of Curiosity in Architecture, © Luca Chiaudano
© Luca Chiaudano

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

João Luís Carrilho da Graça is a Portuguese architect, lecturer, and founder of Carrilho da Graça Arquitectos. In addition to his award-winning projects, the architect has taught at the Technical University of Lisbon, guest-lectured at the Autonomous University of Lisbon and University of Évora, and has been invited to several universities, seminars and conferences all over the world. His work mostly focuses on public projects, creating uniquely-designed spaces for the community.

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Seoul City Machine / Liam Young for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

07:00 - 23 May, 2019
Seoul City Machine / Liam Young for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” Open Call by May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : D-E-F

07:00 - 22 May, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : D-E-F, © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next few of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it.

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters D, E, and F.

What is Healthy Lighting?

Sponsored Article
What is Healthy Lighting?, Courtesy of Alcon Lighting
Courtesy of Alcon Lighting

Talieh Ghane researches the interaction between light and health at the California Lighting Technology Center. We talked about the biological vs. visual system of light, how to synchronize your circadian clock for better health, how light is like a drug, and why you shouldn’t be on your phone right before bed (guilty).

The Impact of the "Happiness Industry" on Architecture

10:00 - 19 May, 2019
The Impact of the "Happiness Industry" on Architecture , "Lava dwellers” in Kalapana State Wayside Park on the island of Hawaii. Image © John Sanphillippo
"Lava dwellers” in Kalapana State Wayside Park on the island of Hawaii. Image © John Sanphillippo

Although The Architecture of Happiness did not gain momentum after its publication in the mid-2000s, the ideology of architecture and well-being has remained a topic of intrigue until today. To further explore this ideology, the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), with the curation of Francesco Garutti, have put together an exhibition that explores how the “happiness industry” has controlled every aspect of contemporary life after the 2008 financial crash.

Our Happy Life, Architecture and Well-being in the Age of Emotional Capitalism is a non-archival show that exhibits work from architects, artists, and photographers. Metropolis’ Samuel Medina spoke to Garutti to discuss the notion behind the exhibition, social media, and architecture’s new spaces of meaning.

Paul Goldberger on Ballpark: Baseball in the American City

08:00 - 19 May, 2019
Paul Goldberger on Ballpark: Baseball in the American City, Orioles Park at Camden Yards by Bob Busser
Orioles Park at Camden Yards by Bob Busser

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Paul Goldberger has a new book out, released just this week, entitled Ballpark: Baseball in the American City. Taking a page from the Ken Burns playbook, the book looks at a particularly American building type as a lens for looking at the broader culture of cities. Goldberger’s premise is a good one: Ballparks do parallel, to a remarkable degree, trends in American urbanism. They start as an escape from the city, then the city builds up around them. Post–World War II, they escape to the suburbs, then decades later return to the city. Today, privatization of the public realm and real estate development are driving the agenda. Recently I talked with Goldberger about the new book and a whole slew of magical ballparks, both living and long gone.

16 Temporary Pavilions that Reflect on Public Space

06:00 - 19 May, 2019
Signals 1.0 by Tools for Action. Image © José Manuel Cutillas
Signals 1.0 by Tools for Action. Image © José Manuel Cutillas

The Wooden Car Covering by Benedetto Bufalino. Image © José Manuel Cutillas Living Cloister by Parasite 2.0. Image © José Manuel Cutillas Taburete Tower de SZCZ Jakub Szczesny. Image © José Manuel Cutillas A Trip Around the Hazelnut Tree by Pablo Losa y Gadea Burgaz. Image © José Manuel Cutillas + 29

The International Festival of Concentric Architecture and Design is characterized by its temporary displays that take place throughout the city. For this year's festival, 16 exhibits have been created that seek to experiment with spaces both within and outside the city of Logroño, bringing with them a whole new way to see and experience the urban surroundings.

10 Buildings That Helped Define Modernism in New York City

08:00 - 18 May, 2019
211 East 48th Street, Midtown East, William Lescaze, 1934. Image © Mark Wickens
211 East 48th Street, Midtown East, William Lescaze, 1934. Image © Mark Wickens

Greater Refuge Temple, Harlem, Costas Machlouzarides, 1966. Image © Mark Wickens Monsignor Farrell High School, Staten Island, Charles Luckman Associates, 1962. Image © Mark Wickens The “Bubble House” (1969) on East 71st Street is one of the city’s most idiosyncratic Modern buildings. Its convex apertures are surprisingly operable, swiveling open from the side. Image © Mark Wickens Tribeca Synagogue, William N. Breger, 1967. Image © Mark Wickens + 12

This Article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine here.

The story of architectural Modernism in New York City goes beyond the familiar touchstones of Lever House and the Seagram Building.

Eighty-five years on, the little white town house on East 48th Street by William Lescaze still startles. With its bright stucco and Purist volumes, it pulls the eye away from the do-nothing brownstones on one side and the noirish sub-Miesian tower on the other. The machined rectitude of its upper floors, telegraphed by two clumsily large spans of glass block, is offset by the freer plastic arrangement of the bottom levels. Le Corbusier’s five points are in evidence (minus the roof garden), suggesting an architecture ready to do battle. Built in 1934 from the shell of a Civil War–era town house, this was the first Modernist house in New York City, and its pioneering feeling for futurity extended to its domestic conveniences. (A skeptical Lewis Mumford noted its central air-conditioning.)

Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens

06:00 - 18 May, 2019
Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens, Casa Torre / Andrew Maynard Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts
Casa Torre / Andrew Maynard Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts

As urban dwellers become more aware of the environmental impacts of food production and transportation, as well as the origin and security of what they consume, urban agriculture is bound to grow and attract public and political eyes. Bringing food production closer, in addition to being sustainable, is pedagogical. However, generally with small size and other restrictions, the concerns of growing food in cities differ somewhat from traditional farming.

Urban gardens can occupy a multitude of places and have varied scales - window sills and balconies, slabs and vacant lots, courtyards of schools, public parks and even unlikely places, such as subway tunnels. They can also be communitarian or private. Whatever the case, it is important to consider some variables:

No Restaurante Tuju, projeto de vapor arquitetura + Garupa Estúdio, todos o paisagismo é feito com espécies comestíveis. Image © Pedro Napolitano Prata Cortesia de US Department of Agriculture Planter Box House / Formzero. Image © Ameen Deen Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens + 19

Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects

07:00 - 17 May, 2019
Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects, 'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus
'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus

The need to substantially reduce our impact on the planet must be translated into a significant change to our lifestyle and habits. One of these is to consume responsibly and consider that waste does not exist, but that all material can be transformed into something useful again following a circular ecological system.

In his book Upcycling Wood, Reutilización creativa de la madera, the architect and artist Bruno Sève writes and edits a non-exhaustive guide of the uses and possibilities of recovered wood, as a framework for responsible reuse; from small scale, such as furniture or artists' canvases, to medium scale, with its use in interiors and facades. This book seeks to raise awareness among professionals and citizens in general through analysis of the life cycle, examples of uses and finishing processes, leading to an ecological and responsible framework. The book is illustrated by numerous design and architecture teams who follow the guidelines of ecological design with reclaimed wood.

Hotel Lobby and Nishi Grand Stair Interior / March Studio. Image © John Gollings 'San Cristóbal', by Bruno Sève. Image © Bruno Sève © Uhuru Recycling Woodstore. Image © The Community wood recycling + 20

Juan Herreros on His Thriving Career in Architecture and Academia

05:00 - 17 May, 2019
Juan Herreros on His Thriving Career in Architecture and Academia, Courtesy of Juan Herreros
Courtesy of Juan Herreros

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

Juan Herreros is an acclaimed Spanish architect with multiple award-winning projects to date. In addition to his impressive creations in the construction field, he has strived to redefine the practice of architecture by teaching at the School of Architecture in Madrid and at the GSAPP Columbia University in New York. His collaborative office, Studio Herreros, is an award-winning firm with projects built all over the world, ranging between residential and public spaces. These projects vary between small-scale, "immediate" projects, and internationally-commissioned structures and building competitions, allowing the architect to be one of the most influential Spanish architects practicing today.

Amey Kandalgaonkar Explores the Architectural Possibilities of Combining Desert Rocks and Geometric Forms

04:30 - 17 May, 2019
House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar
House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar

House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar Rock House 3. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar Rock House 3. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar + 13

Although architecture has been constantly evolving, past builders have laid out a huge amount architectural heritage for us to learn from and get inspired by, and integrating natural elements with man-made structures is no exception.

Shanghai-based architect and architectural photographer Amey Kandalgaonkar found inspiration in the rock cut-tomb of Madain Saleh in Saudi Arabia, and with the same architecture approach, designed two residential projects that incorporate architecture with the rigid parts of nature.

Is the Internet Bringing Us to the Middle Ages? / Deyan Sudjic's Response to the Curatorial Statement of the Shenzhen Biennale(UABB) 2019

07:00 - 16 May, 2019
Is the Internet Bringing Us to the Middle Ages? / Deyan Sudjic's Response to the Curatorial Statement of the Shenzhen Biennale(UABB) 2019, Netherlandish Proverbs, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1559, a photographic reproduction by Google Cultural Institute
Netherlandish Proverbs, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1559, a photographic reproduction by Google Cultural Institute

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” Open Call by May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

Without the city, modernity could never have been invented.  What we are in the midst of discovering now is whether modernity can survive in a city transformed by the digital revolution. The village may offer security and community, but what it does not allow its inhabitants is the possibility of being different, a phenomenon that is as true now as it was during the witch-burning era. 

How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting

04:00 - 16 May, 2019
How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting, © Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects
© Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects

Humans can survive for 30 days without eating, 3 days without drinking, yet only 3 minutes without breathing. Of course our need for air is also constant, we rely on it at all times indoors and outdoors although can often be less clean than we would hope. Unpleasant odors make us aware of bad air, but many irritants and unhealthy gases are not easily detectable by smell while still affecting our health. Smells are the most obvious signal, as they are consciously perceived by the brain and nervous system, allowing us to make judgements about our environment.

Learn more about where poor indoor air quality comes from, why it's important to address within the built environment, and how to design for good indoor air quality and comfort.

© Vivek Muthuramalingam. ImageBiome Environmental Solutions © Javier Callejas. ImageAlberto Campo Baeza © Ishita Sitwala. ImageDesign Work Group  © Nelson Kon. ImageMipibu House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image + 17

Mola Structural Kit 3 Launches on Kickstarter

10:00 - 15 May, 2019
Mola Structural Kit 3 Launches on Kickstarter, Mola Structural Kit 3. Image Courtesy of Mola Model
Mola Structural Kit 3. Image Courtesy of Mola Model

Following the popularity of their first two structural modeling kits, today Mola Model launches their Kickstarter campaign for Mola Structural Kit 3. Mola3 introduces cable structures to the system of hands-on structural learning, integrating seamlessly with the previous two kits. Because the Mola kits are designed as a single modular system, the new kit can be combined with the previous two, all connected via magnets, to model iconic structures like the Sydney Harbor Bridge or London’s Stansted Airport with the help of the bilingual instruction booklet.

14 Outstanding Concert Halls: A Perfect Match Between Acoustics and Aesthetics

07:00 - 15 May, 2019
14 Outstanding Concert Halls: A Perfect Match Between Acoustics and Aesthetics, © Jakub Certowicz
© Jakub Certowicz

When we think about a perfect match between acoustics and good design it may not be as easy as it seems. A number of technical decisions in order to make an interior space acoustically efficient -and to achieve its programmatic purpose correctly- can make some of the architect's design intentions fade and be replaced by standard and prefabricated panels.

In this article, we present a selection of architecture projects that are able to create a memorable visual impact as well as an impeccable interior solution for acoustics. These are our favorite 14 music venues that fascinate inside and out.

© Simon Menges © Adam Mørk Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects © Ema Peter + 32

How To Get Hired And Keep Up a Reputation in Architecture

04:00 - 15 May, 2019

The Midnight Charette is an explicit podcast about design, architecture, and the everyday. Hosted by architectural designers David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, it features a variety of creative professionals in unscripted and long-format conversations that allow for thoughtful takes and more personal discussions. Honesty and humor are used to cover a wide array of subjects: some episodes provide useful tips for designers, while others are project reviews, interviews, or simply explorations of everyday life and design. The Midnight Charette is available for free on iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, and all other podcast directories.

On this episode of The Midnight Charette podcast, hosts David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet discuss six career questions regarding office and employee reputation in Architecture from the Archinect forum thread, The Issue of Reputation in Architecture.

Indoor Pools: Bringing the Tranquility of Water to Interiors

04:30 - 14 May, 2019
Indoor Pools: Bringing the Tranquility of Water to Interiors, © Valentin Jeck
© Valentin Jeck

Within architecture, water evokes sentiments of calmness and wellbeing. The element has influenced design through its dynamic and fluid nature. With recent technological advances, architects have created some of the most strategic, innovative, and unexpected intersections of design and H2O.

Below, we have provided a roundup of indoor pools that highlight the application of water in different spaces, showing its relationship to materiality and use.

This collection is one of many interesting content groupings made by our registered users. Remember you can save and manage what inspires you on My ArchDaily. Create your account here.

© Mariela Apollonio © Yoshihiro Koitani + Aby Helfon y Ramón Helfon © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez © Vinicius Nunes + 30

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