Two Qualities You Need to Succeed in an Architecture Career

10:30 - 25 May, 2016
Two Qualities You Need to Succeed in an Architecture Career, © wavebreakmedia via Shutterstock
© wavebreakmedia via Shutterstock

This article was originally published by The Architect's Guide as "The Two Qualities You Need For Architecture Career Success."

In a survey of 104 Chief Executive Officers reported in Success Magazine a few years ago, they were presented with 20 qualities of an ideal employee, and asked to select the most important.

86% of the senior executives selected two qualities as being more important for career success and advancement than any others:

Concretizing the Global Village: How Roam Coliving Hopes to Change the Way We Live

09:30 - 24 May, 2016
Concretizing the Global Village: How Roam Coliving Hopes to Change the Way We Live, Roam Madrid. Image Courtesy of Roam
Roam Madrid. Image Courtesy of Roam

Growing out of the success of coworking, the latest big phenomenon in the world of property is coliving. Like its predecessor, coliving is predicated upon the idea that sharing space can bring benefits to users in terms of cost and community. And, like its predecessor, there are already many variations on the idea with numerous different ventures appearing in the past year, each tweaking the basic concept to find a niche.

There are a lot of existing accommodation types that are “a bit like” coliving—depending on who you ask, coliving might be described as either a halfway point between apartments and hotels, “dorms for adults” or “glorified hostels.” And yet, despite these similarities to recognizable paradigms, countless recent articles have proclaimed that coliving could “change our thinking on property and ownership,” “change the way we work and travel,” or perhaps even “solve the housing crisis.” How can coliving be so familiar and yet so groundbreaking at the same time? To find out, I spent a week at a soon-to-open property in Miami run by Roam, a company which has taken a uniquely international approach to the coliving formula.

Roam Bali. Image Courtesy of Roam Roam Madrid. Image Courtesy of Roam Roam Miami. Image Courtesy of Roam Roam Bali. Image Courtesy of Roam +12

Instagram Provides a Sneak Peek at 2016 Venice Biennale Exhibitions

15:15 - 23 May, 2016
Instagram Provides a Sneak Peek at 2016 Venice Biennale Exhibitions

As the 2016 Venice Biennale is set to begin this upcoming Saturday, May 28th, the first glimpses of the pavilions have begun to roll in through the social media wires. In addition to the event’s main exhibition, curated by this year's Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena, there will be 63 exhibitions held in country pavilions throughout the grounds responding to this year’s theme of “Reporting From the Front.” We've taken to Instagram to round up the best sneak peeks of the exhibitions coming together at architecture’s preeminent event—read on to take a look.

From Starcraft to Age of Empires: When Architecture Is The Game

09:30 - 23 May, 2016
From Starcraft to Age of Empires: When Architecture Is The Game, Castillos de Age of Empires 2 © Ensemble Studios - 1999. Image
Castillos de Age of Empires 2 © Ensemble Studios - 1999. Image

In this new collaboration, originally titled "Architecture for the system and systems for architecture," Spanish architect and cofounder of the blog MetaSpace, Manuel Saga, reflects on the experience of developing (and taking on) a game where architecture plays a key role for the designer, and for the player. The case studies? No less than four major titles of our times: Starcraft, Age of Empires, Diablo and Dungeon of the Endless.

On MetaSpace we have introduced a general overview of the challenges that video game designers face when creating buildings, cities and even maps. This time we will go one step further: what happens when a game doesn’t offer a narrative or a fixed, open map, but rather an architectural system that the player can take control of? How does a design team respond to something like that?

Let's take a look.

Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid

09:30 - 22 May, 2016
Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid, Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture
Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture

In their semester-long project at Zaha Hadid’s final studio course at the Yale School of Architecture, students Lisa Albaugh, Benjamin Bourgoin, Jamie Edindjiklian, Roberto Jenkins and Justin Oh envisioned a new a high density mixed-use project for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard, the largest undeveloped piece of land still existing in central London.

Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture +17

Students at UIC Barcelona Create 1:1 Plans of Famous Buildings

12:00 - 21 May, 2016

In early 2016, we introduced Vardehaugen, a Norwegian office that created a series of life sized drawings of their projects in their own backyard. After publishing this exercise on our site, Spanish architect and academic Alberto T. Estévez reached out to tell us that this same exercise has been carried out at ESARQ (UIC Barcelona) for the past 10 years with second and third year architecture students. According to Estévez, the exercise "represents something irreplaceable: it brings you closer to experiencing life-sized spaces of classic works of architecture" from the Farnsworth house to José Antonio Coderch's Casa de la Marina.

About 10 years ago I had an idea for a special teaching exercise, one that I thought would be interesting and instructive at the same time. So I started doing the practice class we’ve been talking about with architecture students in their second and third year of study at ESARQ (UIC Barcelona): the School of Architecture, which I founded 20 years ago as the first Director at the International University of Catalonia.

Now, we do the lesson every year in the Architectural Composition class that I teach, which discusses the theory and history of architecture.

Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez +25

This Database Makes Researching Housing Precedents Easy

10:30 - 19 May, 2016
This Database Makes Researching Housing Precedents Easy

Housing blocks come in all different shapes, sizes and layouts. So searching for the precedent that matches every category you desire can sometimes be a tedious process of clicking in and out of an unorganized list. Enter the Collective Housing Atlas, an online library of housing projects that is organized into categories.

Canada, Extraction Empire: A Report From the Edge of Empire (Outdoors, That Is)

04:00 - 19 May, 2016
Canada, Extraction Empire: A Report From the Edge of Empire (Outdoors, That Is), Installation Plan. Image © OPSYS
Installation Plan. Image © OPSYS

With the opening of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale almost upon us, architects, curators and artists have already started to migrate to the city to unlock pavilion doors and sweep out the past six months of hibernation from the previous biennale season. This year, however, one pavilion has confirmed that it will remain closed – the Canadian Pavilion will not be opening its doors. Closure of the space has been attributed to a much-needed renovation, which has been mentioned by those who have exhibited in the space, specifically Shary Boyle at the 2012 Venice Art Biennale. Nevertheless, there are whispers that the political nature of this year’s entry may have been another reason to keep the pavilion shut. That said, Canada will be present by staking claim in the Giardini with a provocative installation entitled Extraction.

10 Typologies of Daylighting: From Expressive Dynamic Patterns to Diffuse Light

10:20 - 18 May, 2016
10 Typologies of Daylighting: From Expressive Dynamic Patterns to Diffuse Light, © Philippe Ruault
© Philippe Ruault

Sunlight has proven to be an excellent formgiver, with which architecture can create dynamic environments. The lighting design pioneer William M.C. Lam (1924-2012) emphasized in his book “Sunlighting as Formgiver” that the consideration of daylight is about much more than energy efficiency. Architects have now found numerous ways of implementing sunlight and the questions arises whether a coherent daylight typology could be a valuable target during the design process. However, many daylight analyses focus mainly on energy consumption.

Siobhan Rockcastle and Marilyne Andersen, though, have developed a thrilling qualitative approach at EPFL in Lausanne. Their interest was driven by the spatial and temporal diversity of daylight, introducing a matrix with 10 shades of daylight.

"Home at Intersection": An Exploration of Relationships, Individuality and Architecture

09:30 - 15 May, 2016
"Home at Intersection": An Exploration of Relationships, Individuality and Architecture, © Yushang Zhang
© Yushang Zhang

What do we mean when we say that our homes are “extensions” of ourselves? To put it more precisely, can a home be an extension of more than one person’s sense of “self”? And what happens when a single building is expected to be a home for two very different people? These are the questions asked in the project “Home at Intersection” by Netherlands-based architect Yushang Zhang.

Developed as a personal project in Zhang’s spare time Home at Intersection is, at its heart, as much a story told through architecture as it is an architectural design. The story chronicles the relationship of two young lovers as they embark upon a new chapter in their life together, building and then inhabiting their dream home. But much more than that, the project investigates themes of individuality and social bonds, using architecture as a medium to understand our hidden emotions.

© Yushang Zhang © Yushang Zhang © Yushang Zhang © Yushang Zhang +29

At Kunstmuseum Basel, iart Creates a Frieze with a Technological Twist

09:30 - 13 May, 2016

Though it was once an essential element of all classical structures, the frieze has largely been left behind by architects looking for contemporary façade systems. But at the recently-opened addition to the Kunstmuseum Basel, designed by Swiss architects Christ & Gantenbein in collaboration with design group iart, the frieze returns with an eye-catching, technological twist, as hidden pixels within the facade light up to display moving images and text to those below.

© Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel +15

Comic Break: "RFQ Problems"

08:00 - 13 May, 2016
Comic Break: "RFQ Problems"

As students, we aspire to become architects that get to work on great design projects. The truth is, for most of us, we end up at firms that don’t quite meet those expectations. That is the experience of the characters in our webcomic, Architexts, and if it’s yours too, we’d love to hear from you for our new book, Architects, LOL.

15 Architects Who Have Been Immortalized on Money

09:30 - 12 May, 2016

In terms of memorialization, being selected to represent your country as the face of a banknote is one of the highest honors you can achieve. Even if electronic transfer seems to be the way of the future, cash remains the reliable standard for exchange of goods and services, so being pasted to the front of a bill guarantees people will see your face on a near-daily basis, ensuring your legacy carries on.

In some countries, the names of the faces even become slang terms for the bills themselves. While “counting Le Corbusiers” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, a select few architects have still been lucky enough to have been featured on such banknotes in recent history. Read on to find out who the 15 architects immortalized in currency are and what they’re worth.

Building on the Built: the Work of Jonathan Tuckey Design

04:00 - 12 May, 2016
Building on the Built: the Work of Jonathan Tuckey Design, Exhibition. Image © James Brittain
Exhibition. Image © James Brittain

In Granary Square, located in London’s King’s Cross, there is a fragment of the poem Brill by Aidan Dunn set into the ground, which reads: “King’s Cross, dense with angels and histories. There are cities beneath your pavements, cities behind your skies.” Anchored by the converted granary building and a rejuvenated stretch of canal, Argent’s ongoing King’s Cross development is an appropriate setting for Building on the Built, an exhibition which presents the work of London-based practice Jonathan Tuckey Design.

April's Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins

09:30 - 11 May, 2016
April's Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins, © Jesse Kuroiwa
© Jesse Kuroiwa

The process of carrying out a project from start to finish includes many different variables, from determining the users' needs to figuring out how best to set up the work site. The latter are an important part of determining the project logistics as well as its design criteria. Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins emphasize this process, using a planning logic that takes into account the design of a minimally-sized living unit under extreme conditions as well as the execution of the assembly in a short time and in a place of difficult access.

5 Reasons to Add Virtual Reality to Your Workflow

09:30 - 10 May, 2016
5 Reasons to Add Virtual Reality to Your Workflow, © Halfpoint via Shutterstock
© Halfpoint via Shutterstock

This article was originally published on ArchSmarter titled "5 Ways Virtual Reality Will Change Architecture."

Virtual Reality (VR) is about to change architecture forever, meaning that every firm needs to decide how it’s going to respond to those changes. That may sound like hyperbole, but 3D imaging and the benefits computers brought to the field pale in comparison to what VR brings.

Computer-generated images are, in many ways, an updated version of the hand-drawn renderings of the past. VR takes viewing models to a whole new level. Based on existing design software, it allows you to take 3D models and experience them in amazing new ways. So if your firm is thinking about whether or not to invest in VR technology now, here are a few reasons why you should stop considering and start changing how your architecture firm functions.

Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?

04:00 - 10 May, 2016
Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?, Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition
Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition

This opinion-piece is a response to Nick Axel’s essay Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value, published on ArchDaily as part of our partnership with Volume.

In his recent article, Nick Axel puts forward a compelling argument for the (re)distribution of city-space according to use value: kickball trophies and absentee owners out, efficient use of space in. Distributing urban space according to use certainly makes sense. Along with unoccupied luxury condos that are nothing more than assets to the 1% and mostly empty vacation apartments, expelling (rarely accessed) back-closets to the suburbs frees more of the limited space in cities for people to actually live in.

Spotlight: Gordon Bunshaft

12:30 - 9 May, 2016
Spotlight: Gordon Bunshaft, Lever House. Image © Flickr user gaf licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
Lever House. Image © Flickr user gaf licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

As lead designer of the Lever House and many of America’s most historically prominent buildings, Pritzker Prize winning architect Gordon Bunshaft (9 May 1909 - 6 August 1990) is credited with ushering in a new era of Modernist skyscraper design and corporate architecture. A stern figure and a loyal advocate of the International Style, Bunshaft spent the majority of his career as partner and lead designer for SOM, who have referred to him as “a titan of industry, a decisive army general, an architectural John Wayne.”