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Which Cities Have the Most Skyscrapers?

09:30 - 27 April, 2017
Which Cities Have the Most Skyscrapers?

There’s a lot that the presence of skyscrapers can say about a city. They can be indicators of anything from wealth to modernization to density, or a combination of all three, depending on where you look. This potential to observe trends in a city through the height of its buildings makes data on those buildings valuable to a multitude of industries, so companies like Emporis conduct and distribute research on topics like the newest, tallest, and most expensive buildings in the world. Keep reading to find out about the ten tall cities that are home to the largest number of skyscrapers—as defined by Emporis' definition of a building that is 100 meters or more.

Watch Construction Begin on Heatherwick's Vessel at Hudson Yards

12:00 - 24 April, 2017

Construction has officially begun on Vessel, the 15-story tall staircase sculpture designed by Heatherwick Studio that will serve as the centerpiece of New York’s massive new Hudson Yards development. To build the structure, 75 individual units are being prefabricated by Cimolai S.p.A. in their Monfalcone, Italy facility, then shipped to New York where they will be assembled on site. These first 10 of these pieces have now completed their 15-day overseas journey, with the remaining pieces scheduled to arrive on-site and put into place over the coming year.

Outdoor assembly at Cimolai's Monfalcone facility. Image © Related-Oxford The first piece in transit. Image © Related-Oxford Stephen Ross and Thomas Heatherwick on the 3rd Level of the Vessel in Monfalcone, Italy. Image © Related-Oxford Assembly at the Monfalcone Workshop. Image © Related-Oxford +16

What Will Thomas Heatherwick's "Vessel" At Hudson Yards Really Add to New York?

09:30 - 19 April, 2017
What Will Thomas Heatherwick's "Vessel" At Hudson Yards Really Add to New York?, The 150-foot-tall steel structure has been compared to a bedbug, a beehive, and a döner kebab. Its base is 50 feet wide and its upper span measures 150 feet. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie, Heatherwick Studio
The 150-foot-tall steel structure has been compared to a bedbug, a beehive, and a döner kebab. Its base is 50 feet wide and its upper span measures 150 feet. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie, Heatherwick Studio

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "What do New Yorkers get when privately-funded public art goes big?"

When Thomas Heatherwick—the nimble London-based designer known for work that defies easy categorization—unveiled his design for a new public landmark called Vessel at Hudson Yards to a crowd of reporters and New York City power players in September, questions abounded. What is it? What will it do to the neighborhood? And what does it say that Stephen Ross, the president and CEO of Related Companies, the primary developer of Hudson Yards, is financing the entire $250 million piece by himself?

It’s natural that Ross chose Heatherwick Studio to design his centerpiece, because the office’s creations stun. For the UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo, it extruded 60,000 clear acrylic tubes from a center space to create a fuzzy, crystalline object whose apparent fragility is as mesmerizing as it is clever. As the studio moves toward ever-larger and ever-more-public commissions, the people who will live with its work will need to seriously consider what it will mean for their neighborhoods and cities.

Irish Hunger Memorial / 1100 Architect

11:00 - 17 April, 2017
Irish Hunger Memorial / 1100 Architect, © Peter Aaron
© Peter Aaron

© Peter Aaron              © Peter Aaron              © Peter Aaron              © Peter Aaron              +7

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    David Piscuskas, FAIA, LEED AP Juergen Riehm, FAIA, BDA
  • Area

    16320.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2001
  • Photographs

Speculative Project Seeks to Take Advantage of NYC Air Rights for Affordable Housing

12:00 - 15 April, 2017
Speculative Project Seeks to Take Advantage of NYC Air Rights for Affordable Housing, Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee
Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee

Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee of Atelier L have unveiled their speculative project, Instant City: Living Air-Right, which proposes that affordable housing and public programs be built in the air rights of existing buildings in New York City. 

As a response to the lack of home ownership in the city, the project aims to provide living space, as well as to foster community in an overlooked space.

Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee Courtesy of Beomki Lee and Chang Kyu Lee +8

Brooklyn’s Iconic Macy’s Store to Receive 10-Story Glass Office Addition to its Historic Architecture

08:00 - 12 April, 2017
Brooklyn’s Iconic Macy’s Store to Receive 10-Story Glass Office Addition to its Historic Architecture, Courtesy of The Wheeler
Courtesy of The Wheeler

Plans have been announced by Tishman Speyer for "The Wheeler", a glassy new addition above downtown Brooklyn’s iconic Macy’s store on Fulton Street. The design is a collaboration between Shimoda Design Group and Perkins Eastman, and incorporates 10 stories of dynamic office and mixed-use space that will sit atop the existing department store.

Paying homage to the renowned 19th century Brooklyn developer Andrew Wheeler, the new offices will come complete with 16 foot ceiling heights, an acre of combined outdoor terrace gardens and decks, an amenity floor, and 360,000 square feet of rentable space, all while capturing the surrounding views of Lower Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, the Statue of Liberty and New York harbour from its vantage point above the existing architecture.

Courtesy of The Wheeler Courtesy of The Wheeler Courtesy of The Wheeler Courtesy of The Wheeler +7

The White Snake / Space4architecture

09:00 - 8 April, 2017
The White Snake / Space4architecture, © Beatrice Pediconi
© Beatrice Pediconi

© Beatrice Pediconi             © Beatrice Pediconi             © Beatrice Pediconi             © Beatrice Pediconi             +20

  • Architects

  • Location

    Manhattan, New York, NY, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Michele Busiri Vici
  • Area

    5000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

    Beatrice Pediconi , Courtesy of Space4architecture

Interiors of Zaha Hadid's Nearly-Complete High Line Residential Building Revealed

16:15 - 5 April, 2017
Interiors of Zaha Hadid's Nearly-Complete High Line Residential Building Revealed, Unit 20. Interiors by Jennifer Post. Image © Scott Francis
Unit 20. Interiors by Jennifer Post. Image © Scott Francis

As Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th approaches completion, photos of the apartment interiors have been revealed for the first time. Shared by developer Related Companies, the images show two of the building’s first completed residences: the massive 4,500-square-foot Unit 20 and the more modest 1,700-square-foot Unit 12. The two units feature the interior built-ins and finishes designed by Hadid alongside interior design schemes envisioned by Jennifer Post and West Chin, respectively.

Unit 20. Interiors by Jennifer Post. Image © Scott Francis Unit 20. Interiors by Jennifer Post. Image © Scott Francis Unit 12. Interiors by West Chin. Image © Scott Francis Unit 12. Interiors by West Chin. Image © Scott Francis +9

Bee Breeders Reveal New York Affordable Housing Challenge Winners

06:00 - 5 April, 2017
Bee Breeders Reveal New York Affordable Housing Challenge Winners, First Prize: The Table Top / Lap Chi Kwong, Alison Von Glinow . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize: The Table Top / Lap Chi Kwong, Alison Von Glinow . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders have selected the winners of the New York Affordable Housing Challenge, inspired by barriers faced by the global population in our contemporary culture of housing scarcity and economic deprivation. The submissions provide various multifaceted architectural responses to scattered sites of various scales around New York City, “redefining the culture, economy, and experience of urban domesticity by means of space, material, morphology, or structure.”

Below are the winners of the New York Affordable Housing Challenge:

First Prize: The Table Top / Lap Chi Kwong, Alison Von Glinow . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Second Prize:  Out-Of-Site / Peter Wong, Christopher Jarrett, Nazinin Modaresahmadi, Robert Stubbs. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Third Prize:  New York Affordable Housing Challenge / Liyang Chen, Yao Zheng. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders NYB Green Award: Forging the Upward Frontier / Ryan Ball. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders +85

The Economics Behind New York's Micro-Apartment Experiment

09:30 - 4 April, 2017
Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market? Carmel Place, located in Manhattan's Kips Bay, features 55 units that range from 260 to 360 square feet. Image Courtesy of Cameron Blayock
Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market? Carmel Place, located in Manhattan's Kips Bay, features 55 units that range from 260 to 360 square feet. Image Courtesy of Cameron Blayock

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market?"

The situation was dire: People were flocking to cities for work, but scarce land and lack of new construction were driving up rent prices. Middle-income residents couldn’t afford the high-end housing stock, nor did they want to enter cramped—sometimes illegally so—apartments. Luckily, a new housing solution appeared: In exchange for small, single-occupancy units, residents could share amenities—like a restaurant-kitchen, dining area, lounge, and cleaning services—that were possible thanks to economies of scale. Sound familiar?

It should: It’s the basic premise behind Carmel Place, a micro-apartment development in Manhattan’s Kips Bay that recently started leasing. The development—whose 55 units range from 260 to 360 square feet—was the result of Mayor Bloomberg’s 2012 adAPT NYC Competition to find housing solutions for the city’s shortage of one- and two-person apartments. Back then, Carmel Place needed special legal exceptions to be built, but last March the city removed the 400-square-foot minimum on individual units. While density controls mean another all-micro-apartment building is unlikely, only building codes will provide a de facto minimum unit size (somewhere in the upper 200 square foot range). What does this deregulation mean for New York City’s always-turbulent housing market? Will New Yorkers get new, sorely needed housing options or a raw deal?

Courtesy of Cameron Blayock Courtesy of Cameron Blayock A high-quality of life is central to Carmel Place’s sell to market-rate renters: Multiple personal services (like housekeeping) and space-saving furniture are included in the rent, and units boast nearly 10-foot-tall ceilings and 8-foot-tall windows to maximize natural light. Image Courtesy of Ollie Courtesy of Ollie +19

160 East 22nd Street / S9 Architecture

09:00 - 4 April, 2017
160 East 22nd Street / S9 Architecture, © Miguel de Guzman
© Miguel de Guzman

© Miguel de Guzman © Justin Huang © Justin Huang © Justin Huang +31

SOM to Lead Major Restoration of New York's Waldorf Astoria

14:25 - 29 March, 2017
SOM to Lead Major Restoration of New York's Waldorf Astoria, Lobby. Image © Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP/ rendering by Methanoia Inc.
Lobby. Image © Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP/ rendering by Methanoia Inc.

The Waldorf Astoria New York has released plans for a top to bottom restoration and revitalization of the building’s historically landmarked exterior and interior space, to be carried out by architects Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) and interior designer Pierre-Yves Rochon (PYR). If approved by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, the restoration will be among the most complex and intensive landmark preservation efforts in New York City history.

Construction Halted on Heatherwick's Pier 55 in New York

08:00 - 27 March, 2017
Construction Halted on Heatherwick's Pier 55 in New York, © Heatherwick Studio via Curbed
© Heatherwick Studio via Curbed

Construction on Heatherwick Studio’s undulating Pier 55 in New York has come to a screeching halt, following a ruling by a United States District Court judge last week that will require the project to undergo an intense wildlife impact review.

Last April, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the project, located on the Hudson River in West Chelsea, the go-ahead, allowing initial construction to begin. But the district judge found that the Army Corps of Engineers had failed to properly consider the wide effects of the projects on the river wildlife.

Morris Adjmi to Transform High Line-Adjacent Warehouse Into Office Building in New York

14:00 - 26 March, 2017
Morris Adjmi to Transform High Line-Adjacent Warehouse Into Office Building in New York, © Morris Adjmi Architects
© Morris Adjmi Architects

Elijah Equities, LLC has unveiled plans for the redevelopment of The Warehouse in New York City, a property currently occupied by car parking and art galleries, which will be transformed into 100,000 square feet of rentable office and retail space designed by Morris Adjmi.

Situated next to the High Line, the building currently at the site is a four-story, 65,000-square-foot former apparel-manufacturing warehouse. The redevelopment will add a three-story, steel-framed, cantilevered addition, resulting in a seven-story building with over 18,000 square feet of rooftop and outdoor amenity space.

© Morris Adjmi Architects © Morris Adjmi Architects © Morris Adjmi Architects © Morris Adjmi Architects +9

Inside Philip Johnson's Underappreciated Glass House in Manhattan

09:30 - 25 March, 2017

The architectural legacy of the Rockefeller family in Manhattan is well-known, most obviously demonstrated in the slab-like Art Deco towers of the Rockefeller Center and the ever-expanding campus of the MoMA. But in a city that is filled with landmarks and historic buildings, it's easy for even the most remarkable projects to go unrecognized. Philip Johnson's Rockefeller Guest House in Manhattan was completed in 1950, just one year after the construction of his better known Glass House in New Canaan. The Glass House is an obvious cousin to the later guest house: both feature largely empty glass and steel boxlike forms, where structural work is exposed and celebrated.

Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition

08:00 - 23 March, 2017
Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition, Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)
Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)

Cast & Place has been announced as the winner of the 2017 City of Dreams competition to create a pavilion for New York City’s Governors Island. Held by not-for-profit arts organization FIGMENT, the AIANY Emerging New York Architects Committee, and the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the competition called for a design to be the hub of FIGMENT’s free community arts festival during Summer 2017, based on questions of the future of New York, how design can confront environmental challenges, and how architecture can be built from recycled or borrowed material.

With these questions in mind, Cast & Place was conceptualized as a pavilion made entirely from waste. 300,000 recycled aluminum cans, cast into the cracks of dried clay, will form structural panels that assemble into shaded spaces for performance and play.

Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) +9

How Artificial Intelligence Helped to Create a Gaudí-Inspired Thinking Sculpture

06:00 - 23 March, 2017
How Artificial Intelligence Helped to Create a Gaudí-Inspired Thinking Sculpture, Courtesy of IBM
Courtesy of IBM

IBM and New-York-based design studio SOFTlab have teamed up to create the first thinking sculpture, inspired by Gaudí and developed with IBM’s Watson cognitive technology for the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

In order to help design the sculpture, Watson was taught about the history and style of Gaudí and the architecture of Barcelona through volumes of images, literary works, articles, and even music. From these references, Watson helped to uncover critical insights on patterns in Gaudí's work—like crabs, spiders, and color palettes—that the design team didn't initially associate with Gaudí. The resulting four-meter-tall sculpture features a structural surface made of over 1200 unique aluminum parts, and is unmistakably reminiscent of Gaudí’s work both in look and feel, yet entirely distinct.

The sculpture was on display from February 27 to March 2 at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, where it interacted with visitors by changing shape in real-time, in response to sentiments from Twitter. To learn more about the sculpture, ArchDaily was given to opportunity to speak with IBM Watson Manager Jonas Nwuke.

Courtesy of IBM Courtesy of IBM Courtesy of IBM Courtesy of IBM +10

Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Designs for Supertall Mixed-Use Skyscraper in New York

11:30 - 22 March, 2017
Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Designs for Supertall Mixed-Use Skyscraper in New York , © Zaha Hadid Architects/Kushner Companies
© Zaha Hadid Architects/Kushner Companies

A 1,400-foot-tall mixed-use skyscraper by Zaha Hadid Architects may be the next supertall structure to hit midtown Manhattan. Located at 666 Fifth Avenue between 52nd and 53rd Street, the project is the brainchild of Kushner Properties, who currently co-own the existing 483-foot-tall building with Vornado Realty Trust.

Estimated to cost up to $12 billion, the company is currently negotiating a multi-billion dollar deal with Chinese holding company Anbang Insurance Group to finance the project. If plans to buy out the building go through, Kushner would be in the clear to begin construction on the ZHA-designed tower, which would rebrand the property as 660 Fifth Avenue and offer 464,000-square-feet of residential space, an 11-story hotel, and a 9-story retail podium.