Win Tickets to the IDEAS CITY Conference Next Week in NYC

Courtesy of The

Next week, the New Museum in New York will kickstart the annual IDEAS CITY Festival on Thursday, May 28th. Themed after Italo Calvino‘s “The Invisible City,” the three-day event will “explore questions of transparency and surveillance, citizenship and representation, expression and suppression, participation and dissent, and the enduring quest for visibility in the city” through a number of platforms, such as panels discussions, poetry slams, mobile art installations, workshops, exhibitions and most notably the transformation of New York City’s Bowery neighborhood into a “temporary city of ideas.”

Interested in attending? Five of our readers have the chance to win tickets to the festival’s opening conference. Enter the sweepstakes below for a chance to watch a screening of Mannahatta: Studies for an Opera about Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, listen to Bjarke Ingels discuss the relevance of literary speculation, and much more (the full conference schedule).

All those who will be in New York City on May 28th are eligible to participate. Follow the instructions to enter below.

Official Image Released Of New York’s 1775-Foot Nordstrom Tower

Official render released May 2015. Image © Extell via YIMBY

Update May 20th 2015: Once again uncovered by New York YIMBY, development company Extell has released the first official rendering of 217 West 57th Street, also known as the Nordstrom Tower, as shown above. Below, see our coverage of the first unofficial images from last year.

The designs of the Nordstrom Tower in New York, the world’s tallest residential building at 1,775 feet tall, have been revealed to New York YIMBY by an anonymous tipster close to the project. The project at 225 West 57th Street by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture will be one foot short of 1 World Trade Center, and with its 1,451 high roof will finally reclaim the title of United States’ tallest roof from Chicago‘s Willis Tower.

More on the Nordstrom Tower after the break

Work Begins on Steven Holl’s Hunters Point Library in Queens

© Steven Holl Architects

Construction has commenced on Steven Holl ArchitectsHunters Point Community Library in Queens, New York. Rising along the shoreline on the city’s East River near a cluster of newly built high-rise condominiums, the 22,000 square-foot (6,705 meter) library aims to provide a community-centric public space and park to the increasingly privatized Long Island City waterfront.

Watch Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard Take Shape in New York

Herzog & de Meuron‘s 56 Leonard is taking shape in New York. Due to top out this summer, the 60-story condominium has become known as the “Jenga tower” for its cantilevered glass facade. Upon its completion in 2016, the 821 foot-tall (250 meter) Tribeca building will be comprised of 145 residences and will feature a  sculpture at its base. Check out the Rob Cleary time-lapse above to view the building’s progress over the last year.

SecondMedia’s Foamspace Proposal Wins Storefront’s 2015 Street Architecture Competition

Courtesy of SecondMedia

SecondMedia has been selected as the winner of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s 2015 Street Architecture Prize Competition. Now in its third year, the biennial international competition seeks to implement temporary outdoor installations that facilitate “new forms of collective public gathering.” Participants in the 2015 were asked to respond to the theme of New York‘s IDEAS City Festival, “The Invisible City.” SecondMedia’s winning proposal ‘Foamspace’ — which envisions creating an “urban lounge” with Geofoam blocks — beat out over 70 submissions from teams of artists, engineers, and architects across the globe.

Learn more about the project and view selected images after the break.

The Whitney Museum / Renzo Piano Building Workshop + Cooper Robertson

© Nic Lehoux

Architects: Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Cooper Robertson
Location: 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014, USA
Partners In Charge: M.Carroll, E.Trezzani
Partner In Charge Cooper Robertson : Scott Newman, FAIA
Area: 7520.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Nic Lehoux, Timothy Schenck, Karin Jobst

Renzo Piano Designs New Handbag Inspired by the Whitney Museum

© Max Mara

Renzo Piano has designed a limited-edition handbag for the Italian fashion brand Max Mara to match his newly completed Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. The leather, top-handle bag, inspired by the ”pure design and sophisticated materials” of the Whitney, features distinct ribbing inspired by the museum’s facade.

“Our aim was to apply one of the most characteristic elements of the museum project – the facade – to the bag: hence the idea of the modular strips enveloping the exterior,” said Piano in an interview with Max Mara. “We tried to maintain a simple, pure design, working only on the details by applying a creative use of technology and placing the accent on respect for the materials.”

Renzo Piano’s First US Residential Tower to Rise in New York

Renzo Piano’s recently completed in New York City. Image © Paul Clemence

According to the New York Post, Renzo Piano has been commissioned by Michael Shvo and Bizzi & Partners to design his first US residential tower. Planned to rise in the southern Manhattan district of at 100 Varick Street, the Piano-designed tower will include up to 280,000 square-feet of housing and reach nearly 300 feet. Featured amenities include a “gated private driveway” and “automated parking.” Stay tuned for more details.

Piano recently completed the highly discussed Whitney Museum in city’s Meatpacking District. See what the critics have to say about the project, here.

Henry N. Cobb Awarded Architectural League President’s Medal

John Hancock Tower in Boston. Image © Flickr CC User Zach Heller

The Architectural League of New York has awarded its President’s Medal to Henry N. Cobb of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects. The League’s highest honor, the medal was awarded to Cobb “for the truly consequential work he has created as designer, educator, thinker, writer, and leader,” says the jury citation.

“We are inspired by his decades-long passion for the art of architecture; by his analytic rigor, manifest in subtle and articulate buildings and penetrating readings of history and place; by the broad and profoundly informed humanist culture that suffuses his writings and approach to education; and by the unbounded curiosity and delight he takes in new ideas, new work, and new talent. Henry N. Cobb embodies that combination of capability and conviction—artistic, intellectual, practical, and civic—that defines the ideal architect.”

The Architectural Lab: A History Of World Expos

The Universal Exposition of 1889. Image via Wikimedia Commons

World Expos have long been important in advancing architectural innovation and discourse. Many of our most beloved monuments were designed and constructed specifically for world’s fairs, only to remain as iconic fixtures in the cities that host them. But what is it about Expos that seem to create such lasting architectural landmarks, and is this still the case today? Throughout history, each new Expo offered architects an opportunity to present radical ideas and use these events as a creative laboratory for testing bold innovations in design and building technology. World’s fairs inevitably encourage competition, with every country striving to put their best foot forward at almost any cost. This carte blanche of sorts allows architects to eschew many of the programmatic constraints of everyday commissions and concentrate on expressing ideas in their purest form. Many masterworks such as Mies van der Rohe’s German Pavilion (better known as the Barcelona Pavilion) for the 1929 International Exposition are so wholeheartedly devoted to their conceptual approach that they could only be possible in the context of an Exposition pavilion.

To celebrate the opening of Expo Milano 2015 tomorrow, we’ve rounded up a few of history’s most noteworthy World Expositions to take a closer look at their impact on architectural development.

Video: Bjarke Ingels on Urban Hybrids and “Courtscrapers”

Bjarke Ingels has built a reputation for formulating new urban hybrids. From merging power plants with ski slopes to reintroducing nature to the workspace, Ingels’ well-respected practice BIG is missioned to realize the fictitious world we all dream to inhabit by redefining conventional building typologies. An example of this is the Danish practice’s “courtscraper” – W57, a clever union of the courtyard building and skyscraper that guarantees sunlight to all its inhabitants. Watch the video above to learn more.

Insiders Tip BIG to Redesign Foster + Partners’ World Trade Center 2 Tower

Orignial WTC scheme; Foster + Partners

A new report from the Wall Street Journal suggests that BIG may replace Foster + Partners to realize the 2 (WTC2) tower - the final tower planned to be built on Ground Zero. The 79-story tower, originally designed in 2006, was stalled due to the economic crash of 2008. 

According to the report, 21st Century Fox and News Corp have “tipped” to redesign the tower should they strike an agreement with project backers Silverstein Properties and The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to move into the tower. If the deal goes through, the two companies would occupy nearly half of the building – enough to kickstart development. 

SHoP’s 626 First Avenue Coming Soon to NYC’s East River

©

Construction is underway on SHoP Architects‘ newest addition to the New York skyline – 626 First Avenue. The conjoined residential towers, slated for completion in early 2016, aims to stimulate development on the city’s East River. Once complete, they will add 800 residential units to the area connected via a sky bridge. Featured amenities will include an indoor lap pool, communal lounge areas, rooftop deck, fitness center, and film screening room. In addition to the cooper structures, SHoP will also design all the buildings’ interiors and furniture, making the development a true gesamtkunstwerk.

Read on for more images of the project and a fly-through around the structure. 

New Images Released of SHoP Architects’ 111 West 57th Street

© Property Markets Group via YIMBY

Uncovered by New York YIMBY, five new images have been revealed showing SHoP Architects‘ supertall and super-slender tower at 111 West 57th Street in Manhattan, just south of Central Park on what has become known as “Billionaire’s Row” (on account of the slew of new residential skyscrapers with some unit prices approaching $100 million).

David Chipperfield’s First Residential Project in New York to be Built at Bryant Park

David Chipperfield. Image Courtesy of

Manhattan based real-estate company HFZ Capital Group has announced “The Bryant,” David Chipperfield Architects‘ first residential project in New York City, located at 16 West 40th Street. The proposal for the 32-story building features a hotel on the lower levels, with 57 apartments ranging from one- to four-bedrooms, including two duplex penthouses, on floors 15 through 32 – offering residents “the rare opportunity to live in a new construction, residential development on the fully-restored Bryant Park,” according to the developers.

8 Influential Art Deco Skyscrapers by Ralph Thomas Walker

The Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building (now the Verizon Building) in . Image © Flickr user Wally Gobetz

No architect played a greater role in shaping the twentieth century Manhattan skyline than Ralph Thomas Walker, winner of the 1957 AIA Centennial Gold Medal and a man once dubbed “Architect of the Century” by the New York Times. [1] But a late-career ethics scandal involving allegations of stolen contracts by a member of his firm precipitated his retreat from the architecture establishment and his descent into relative obscurity. Only recently has his prolific career been popularly reexamined, spurred by a new monograph and a high-profile exhibit of his work at the eponymous Walker Tower in New York in 2012.

Pratt Institute to Host 2 Free Symposiums in April

Courtesy of Pratt Institute

Pratt Institute is presenting two architectural symposiums that are free and open to the public: “An Inventory of What’s Possible“ on April 10 and “The Language of Architecture and Trauma” on April 11, 2015. “An Inventory of What’s Possible” will focuse on the history of America’s affordable housing emerging from the research, architectural prototypes, and financing that occurred in New York, as well as the city’s future potential in response to Mayor de Blasio’s housing plan.

The second event, “The Language of Architecture and Trauma,” will observe modern responses to trauma including disaster relief, today’s “crisis culture,” and the role of writing in addressing trauma. Through the combined lenses of architecture, fine arts, anthropology, and poetics, the program will create a dialogue examining the role of writing in architectural production, and more broadly in affecting the world. For more information on either of these , visit www.pratt.edu.

Álvaro Siza to Design 122-Meter Condo Tower in New York

© Fernando Guerra via Instagram

Álvaro Siza has been commissioned to design his first ever US project. Planned to rise 122-meters on the corner of West 56th Street and Eleventh Avenue in New York City, the Siza – designed tower will be developed by Sumaida and Khurana – the same firm who just released designs for Tadao Ando’s first New York City tower: 152 Elizabeth Street. Stay tuned for more details.