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How Toyo Ito is Embarking on a "New Career Epoch" With Small-Scale Community Architecture

09:30 - 18 November, 2016
How Toyo Ito is Embarking on a "New Career Epoch" With Small-Scale Community Architecture, Steel Hut, Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Omishima, Japan. Image © Daici Ano
Steel Hut, Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Omishima, Japan. Image © Daici Ano

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Toyo Ito’s Next Architectural Feat: Revitalizing Omishima Island in Japan."

Last year, as construction at his National Taichung Theater in Taiwan was winding down, Toyo Ito found himself at a crossroads.

A 10-year project in the making, the gargantuan cultural beacon is made of biomorphically curved concrete walls that wind together like a knot of arteries, creating an otherworldly experience for arts patrons. It’s every bit the landmark project you’d expect from 2013’s Pritzker Prize Laureate, but its rapidly approaching completion triggered a vital question: Where to go from here?

A Virtual Look Into Mies van der Rohe's Core House

09:30 - 17 November, 2016
A Virtual Look Into Mies van der Rohe's Core House, Courtesy of Archilogic
Courtesy of Archilogic

Architecture depends on its time. It is the crystallization of its inner structure, the slow unfolding of its form. – Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

20 Details of Stunning Small-Scale Structures

08:00 - 17 November, 2016
20 Details of Stunning Small-Scale Structures

Throughout history, simple structures have constituted one of the most common forms of human expression. Small-scale housing, shelters, and viewpoints have been shaped by myriad materials that effectively created - depending on the techniques used - different forms of response to the same need.

Here is a compilation of 20 small-scale projects that stand out due to their small size and their simple, practical structures.

How to Design Theater Seating, Shown Through 21 Detailed Example Layouts

09:30 - 16 November, 2016
How to Design Theater Seating, Shown Through 21 Detailed Example Layouts

Audience sightlines, accessibility and acoustics all make theater seating a hugely precise art. As part of their set of online resources for architects and designers, the team at Theatre Solutions Inc (TSI) have put together a catalog of 21 examples of theater seating layouts. Each layout is well detailed, with information on the number of seats, the floor seating area and row spacing. These layouts fall under three general forms; to supplement this information, alongside TSI's diagrams we've included the pros and cons of each type, as well as examples of projects which use each format. Read on for more.

The Blyth Performing Arts Centre / Stevens Lawson Architects. Image © Mark Smith Theatre Agora / UNStudio. Image © Iwan Baan Ulumbarra Theatre / Y2 Architecture. Image © Peter Clarke Hamburg Elbphilharmonie / Herzog & de Meuron. Image © Iwan Baan +32

How to Design School Restrooms for Increased Comfort, Safety and Gender-Inclusivity

09:30 - 15 November, 2016
Northwood Elementary School in the Mercer Island School District. Image © Benjamin Benschneider
Northwood Elementary School in the Mercer Island School District. Image © Benjamin Benschneider

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Why Architects Must Rethink Restroom Design in Schools."

"Gang style" bathrooms, in which rows of stalls are installed opposite rows of wash basins and designated only for males or for females, have been de rigueur in educational facilities for the last hundred years. They involve predictable plumbing, mechanical exhaust, and fixture costs. Short doors and divider walls allow for the passive monitoring of behavior.

Relinquishing this traditional bathroom model is daunting, since individual toilet rooms can significantly increase costs through additional plumbing, ductwork, ventilation, partitions, doors and hardware. These designs many times require additional space, trigger further ADA compliance, and invalidate some USGBC LEED points. Moreover, school districts typically have limited budgets, established facilities, and deep-rooted social practices.

8 Short Architectural Texts You Need To Know

09:30 - 14 November, 2016
© Sharon Lam, using an image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Adolfloos.2.jpg'>Wikimedia user Martin H.</a> licensed under Public Domain
© Sharon Lam, using an image by Wikimedia user Martin H. licensed under Public Domain

Update: We've added links to help you find these books for purchase and, in 5 of 8 cases, tracked down a way you can read them online for free!

Quality over quantity, so the saying goes. With so many concepts floating around the architectural profession, it can be difficult to keep up with all the ideas which you're expected to know. But in architecture and elsewhere, the most memorable ideas are often the ones that can be condensed textually: “form follows function,” “less is more,” “less is a bore.” Though slightly longer than three words, the following lists a selection of texts that don’t take too long to read, but impart long-lasting lessons, offering you the opportunity to fill gaps in your knowledge quickly and efficiently. Covering everything from loos to Adolf Loos, the public to the domestic, and color to phenomenology, read on for eight texts to place on your reading list:

Adaptable Bamboo Geodesic Domes Win the Buckminster Fuller Challenge Student Category 2016

09:30 - 13 November, 2016
Adaptable Bamboo Geodesic Domes Win the Buckminster Fuller Challenge Student Category 2016, Courtesy of CHHAT
Courtesy of CHHAT

Launched in 2007, The Buckminster Fuller Challenge has quickly gained a reputation for being what Metropolis Magazine once called “Socially-Responsible Design’s Highest Award.” This year, for the first time, a Student Category was reviewed separately from the general applications, however still based upon the same criteria: comprehensiveness, feasibility, replicability, ecological responsibility, and how verifiable and anticipatory the project is. Students from the Centre for Human Habitat and Alternative Technology (CHHAT) claimed the prize with their adaptable and lightweight modular domes, made from natural, local or recycled materials.

Courtesy of CHHAT Courtesy of CHHAT Courtesy of CHHAT Courtesy of CHHAT +12

Project of the Month: Casino and Hotel Ovalle

00:00 - 13 November, 2016
Project of the Month: Casino and Hotel Ovalle, Courtesy of Turner Arquitectos
Courtesy of Turner Arquitectos

Geography and climate are two important conditions that determine how people can live in a certain environment. When we add to this the cultural characteristics of a region, what appears, as Carl Sauer would say, is a "cultural landscape," a result of humankind’s settlement and adaptation to the territory. When architecture adopts a sensitivity to these conditions, and concerns itself with what the environment offers, living conditions take on a quality of lasting comfort.

For October’s Project of the Month we want to highlight the Casino and Hotel Ovalle by Turner Arquitectos, which adopts an aesthetic pertinent to the geography and cultural landscape of its location. ArchDaily en Español spoke with the project’s architects to find out more about their design.

This New Drawing App Shows How Digital Software Will Save Sketching, Not Destroy It

09:30 - 11 November, 2016

Mental Canvas is not the first software that attempts to save the act of sketching--we have seen 3D "sketching" tools such as SketchUp, as well as applications that simply simulate sketching on paper, such as Morpholio's popular range of sketching apps. But what makes Mental Canvas revolutionary is that you have the ability to sketch freely in a three-dimensional space without the constraints of traditional CAD modelling; it’s what Julie Dorsey, founder of Mental Canvas, calls a "graphical media"; not fully flat but not fully 3D. The software will be released later this year on Microsoft Surface devices, including the recently announced Surface Studio, working with the hardware of the Surface computers and the Surface Dial to provide a natural sketching experience on a virtual canvas.

Courtesy of Mental Canvas Courtesy of Mental Canvas Courtesy of Mental Canvas Courtesy of Mental Canvas +10

The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?

09:30 - 10 November, 2016
The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?, Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta
Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta

This article by Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, the cofounder of Snøhetta, was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Opinion: The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors."

Maybe with the sole exception of railway stations, public space is generally understood as outdoor space. Whether in the United States or in Europe, especially now with heightened concerns around security, there seems to be this determined way of privatizing everything that is indoors, even as we are increasingly aiming to improve access to public space outdoors. But in the layered systems of our cities of the future, we will need to focus on the public spaces that are found inside buildings—and make them accessible.

10 Models Which Show the Power of Point Cloud Scans, As Selected by Sketchfab

09:30 - 9 November, 2016
10 Models Which Show the Power of Point Cloud Scans, As Selected by Sketchfab, via Sketchfab
via Sketchfab

Traditional 3D models made up of surfaces have for a long time aided us in visualizing buildings and spaces, but they often come at a cost: large models require a lot of storage and processing power, and can become incredibly complex to the point where they are difficult to navigate. As a part of our Selected by Sketchfab series, Sketchfab has their eye on a more efficient, increasingly common method of capturing architectural spaces; namely, point clouds. Point clouds are made up of a set of points located in a three-dimensional coordinate system, that when put together merely give an impression of the surface of an object, or the façade of a building.

40 Impressive Details Using Concrete

08:00 - 8 November, 2016
40 Impressive Details Using Concrete

Due to its ability to mold and create different shapes, concrete is one of architecture's most popular materials. While one of its most common uses is as a humble foundation, its plasticity means that it is also used in almost all types of construction, from housing to museums, presenting a variety of details of work that deserves special attention.

Check out this collection of 40 projects that highlight the use of concrete. Impressive! 

Highlights at the 2016 Dutch Design Week Center on Reinventing the Humble Brick

04:00 - 8 November, 2016
Highlights at the 2016 Dutch Design Week Center on Reinventing the Humble Brick, © Nick Bookelar
© Nick Bookelar

The strength of Dutch Design Week (DDW), held annually at the end of October, lies primarily in product design. Although the event has expanded over the past five years to incorporate more fashion, graphics and architecture, small-scale industrial design has retained its preeminence. Many of the designers on show in this year's edition, however, have embraced the challenges of other design disciplines and allowed them to feed into their work. But where does product design meet architecture? Building materials and, most notably at the 2016 event, some really nice bricks. Rotterdam-based architect Alison Killing guides us through her top installations.

21 Careers You Can Pursue With A Degree in Architecture

08:30 - 7 November, 2016
21 Careers You Can Pursue With A Degree in Architecture, © Ariana Zilliacus
© Ariana Zilliacus

Completing a degree in architecture can be a long and arduous process, but also wonderfully rewarding. Despite this, many freshly graduated architects find themselves unsure about where to begin, or deciding that they actually don’t want to be architects at all. Here is a list of 21 careers you can pursue with a degree in architecture, which may help some overcome the daunting task of beginning to think about and plan for the professional life that awaits.

© Ariana Zilliacus © Ariana Zilliacus © Ariana Zilliacus © Ariana Zilliacus +9

Look Inside a Collection of London-Based Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin

03:30 - 7 November, 2016
Look Inside a Collection of London-Based Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin, © Marc Goodwin
© Marc Goodwin

Architectural photographer Marc Goodwin has recently shot the second collection of his "ultra-marathon of photoshoots" – in London. Following his unique insight into the spaces occupied by Nordic architectural offices (based in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Helsinki), Goodwin has turned his lens to a broad collection of practices in the British capital, captured in just seven days. From Zaha Hadid Architects' former school to Foster + Partner's monumental studios on the banks of the River Thames, here are a series of surprising places that architectural offices call home.

Why a City's Mayor Has To Be Its Chief Architect

09:30 - 4 November, 2016
Why a City's Mayor Has To Be Its Chief Architect, © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Miami_from_above.jpg'>Ron Reiring via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Ron Reiring via Wikimedia licensed under CC BY 2.0

Elected in 2001, over eight years in office Miami's former mayor Manny Diaz oversaw one of the most dramatic urban transformations in the United States' history. Diaz was therefore invited to offer the opening remarks to the second day of the 2016 Design Matters Conference, presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations, which is currently taking place in the city. In his speech delivered at the Miami Center for Art and Design, Diaz explains how he developed the "Miami 21" zoning code to leverage the power of architecture and urban planning, ultimately turning Miami from a subject of jokes into one of the United States' most successful and admired cities. Below is an edited version of this speech.

Ron asked me to explain how a lawyer with no experience in elective office and with no training whatsoever in architecture, urban planning or city design ends up with land use and Miami 21 as the signature project of his administration.

Spotlight: Wang Shu

06:00 - 4 November, 2016
Spotlight: Wang Shu, Ningbo History Museum. Image © Iwan Baan
Ningbo History Museum. Image © Iwan Baan

Wang Shu (born November 4, 1963) is a Hangzhou-based architect and dean at the China Academy of Art, known for his thoughtful resistance to what he considers “professionalized, soulless architecture.” His honoring of local tradition, environment, and craftsmanship saw him become the first Chinese citizen, and the fourth youngest person overall, to receive the Pritzker Prize in 2012 for "an architecture that is timeless, deeply rooted in its context and yet universal.”

Drive – Volume #49: Hello World!

04:00 - 3 November, 2016
Drive – Volume #49: Hello World!, Scene from "Ex Machina". Image © Volume
Scene from "Ex Machina". Image © Volume

The following essay by Carla Leitão and Ed Keller was first published by Volume Magazine in their 49th issue, Hello World! You can read the Editorial of this issue, Going Livehere.

What are the philosophical consequences of automation after the integration of pervasive AI into the architecture, landscapes and cognitive maps of our planet and its populations? We suggest that "natural models" of automation pre-exist our technology, with profound implications for human and planetary systems. We’re interested in specific examples and models outside of our cultural milieu that test the limits of bodies, that map habits and their disruption through noise, and reframe the relation between life and consciousness. The following examples index the performance of networks in tight cycles of feedback loops: machines teaching machines. To go to the root of the philosophical consequences of automation our path is through abstract and universalist models of ‘natural laws’, redeployed into specific local situations. We use the term ‘drive’ for its myriad implications connecting across the examples we have chosen.

Why BIG's Fearless Architecture Should Be Awarded and Celebrated

15:53 - 2 November, 2016
Why BIG's Fearless Architecture Should Be Awarded and Celebrated, © Kirsten Bucher
© Kirsten Bucher

Today, at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Bjarke Ingels and BIG were presented with the International Highrise Award for Via 57 West, their "courtscraper" building in Manhattan. The following speech, which has been translated from the original German by Clara Jaschke, was delivered by architecture critic and curator Bart Lootsma at the event.

I was truly delighted when Peter Cachola Schmal called me to ask whether I would deliver the citation for Bjarke Ingels and BIG at this year’s edition of the International Highrise Award.

Just the weekend before I had been thinking that I should write something about BIG. For weeks, one spectacular and interesting project after another had been popping up on Bjarke’s, Kai-Uwe Bergmann’s and a couple of others’ Facebook pages.

INTERIORS: Kanye West's Saint Pablo Tour

08:30 - 2 November, 2016
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal

Interiors is an Online Publication about the space between Architecture and Film, published by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian. Interiors runs an exclusive column for ArchDaily that analyzes and diagrams films in terms of space.

Kanye West followed up his demented masterpiece Yeezus with an art project—an album never officially released, never officially completed, and one that is continuously being revised and restructured. It’s a continuous work in progress, a painting that’s never finished, which has evolved before our eyes (known by many titles including So Help Me God, Swish, Waves, until finally settling on the anachronistic The Life of Pablo).

It’s no wonder then that The Saint Pablo Tour, which kicked off in Indianapolis on August 25th, 2016 and is tentatively scheduled to end in Brooklyn on December 31st, 2016, feels unlike anything Kanye West has done before, while staying true to his creative vision. If 2013’s Yeezus Tour was an operatic experience that was more about the performance aspect, 2016’s Saint Pablo Tour is an active experience that is more about creating a Disneyesque attraction.

The Long(ish) Read: "Ornament and Crime" by Adolf Loos

04:00 - 2 November, 2016
The Long(ish) Read: "Ornament and Crime" by Adolf Loos, Villa Müller (1930), Czech Republic / Adolf Loos
Villa Müller (1930), Czech Republic / Adolf Loos

Welcome to the fourth installment of The Long(ish) Read: an AD feature which presents texts written by notable essayists that resonate with contemporary architecture, interior architecture, urbanism or landscape design. Ornament and Crime began as a lecture delivered by Adolf Loos in 1910 in response to a time (the late 19th and early 20th Centuries) and a place (Vienna), in which Art Nouveau was the status quo.

Loos used the essay as a vehicle to explain his distain of "ornament" in favour of "smooth and previous surfaces," partly because the former, to him, caused objects and buildings to become unfashionable sooner, and therefore obsolete. This—the effort wasted in designing and creating superfluous ornament, that is—he saw as nothing short of a "crime." The ideas embodied in this essay were forerunners to the Modern movement, including practices that would eventually be at core of the Bauhaus in Weimar.

How New Video-Game-Inspired Tools Are Redefining Post Occupancy Evaluation

09:30 - 1 November, 2016
How New Video-Game-Inspired Tools Are Redefining Post Occupancy Evaluation, A real-time synthetic environments screen grab of the reception area at St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust in St Helens, UK. Image Courtesy of Arup
A real-time synthetic environments screen grab of the reception area at St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust in St Helens, UK. Image Courtesy of Arup

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "A Video Game Is Overtaking Post-Occupancy Evaluation in Architecture."

Evaluating the user performance of a particular building design is obviously a good way for clients and architects to gauge whether their design was successful—or could have been better.

There’s even an entire academic discipline called post-occupancy evaluation (POE) devoted to this concept, and Arup is tapping into it with a network of 22 industry partners using the Building Use Studies (BUS) methodology. Too few designers tap into POE, but with gamified simulations done before projects are built, that could change.

Why the Austrian Government's Plan to Demolish Hitler's Birth House is Contentious

04:00 - 1 November, 2016
Why the Austrian Government's Plan to Demolish Hitler's Birth House is Contentious, US soldiers photographed defacing Hitler's birth house in Braunau am Inn (1945)
US soldiers photographed defacing Hitler's birth house in Braunau am Inn (1945)

Mankind has a strange relationship with the darker elements of its history. While some argue that we must consign our greatest mistakes to the past in order to move forward, others believe that ignoring, or refusing to acknowledge, our transgressions dishonors those who suffered – and leaves us vulnerable to repeating them. This ongoing debate has found its latest incarnation in western Austria, where the national government has announced its intention to demolish a seemingly unremarkable yellow house in the riverside town of Braunau am Inn – a house which, despite its unassuming façade, has gained infamy as the birthplace of Adolf Hitler.

7 Scary Architectural Elements That Wouldn't Meet Building Code Requirements Today

09:30 - 31 October, 2016
The Skull Chapel in Czermna, Poland. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Poland_-_Czermna_-_Chapel_of_Skulls_-_interior_06.jpg'>Wikimedia user Merlin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>
The Skull Chapel in Czermna, Poland. Image© Wikimedia user Merlin licensed under CC BY 3.0

Architecture is often the backdrop, rather than the subject, of the scary. For example, The Shining owes much to the Overlook Hotel, “haunted” is often followed by “house,” and Victorian architecture has come to be associated with the creepy. In a less supernatural manner however, architectural elements themselves have proven over history to be scary in their own right. With the clarity that only retrospect can offer, it’s easy to look back on the following macabre materials, bleak utilities, and terrifying technologies in horror... but perhaps what is most scary is to consider which aspects of architecture we might blindly accept today that will also become glaringly frightening with time.