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Architectural Photographers: The Latest Architecture and News

Santiago Metro Line 3 Captured by María González

© María González© María González© María González© María González+ 13

Rumor had it that behind the walls of historic subway station Cal y Canto in Santiago de Chile, a hidden ghost station would eventually link to Line 3—a planned route that was part of the original Metro master plan designed in the 60s. Its construction would have been shelved after the magnitude-7.8 1985 earthquake that forced public resources to be redirected for the reconstruction of the Chilean central valley.

34 years later, the Cal y Canto Metro station finally opened its connection with Line 3, the most recent addition to the rapid transit system, thus becoming the seventh line of Santiago after lines 1, 2, 4, 4A, 5, and 6.

"Pictures Tell A Truth": Behind The Scenes With Niveditaa Gupta

Courthouse by MOAD Architects. Image © Niveditaa GuptaRugs by Mark Krebs. Image © Niveditaa GuptaFound by Aanshiki Mittal. Image © Niveditaa GuptaBhadran School by SRDA. Image © Niveditaa Gupta+ 17

In this episode of “Behind the Scenes”, where we showcase the work of visionary photographers and ask about their experiences beyond what is seen by the public, we are presenting Niveditaa Gupta, an architectural photographer, and filmmaker based in New Delhi, India. Through her photos, she looks to create visuals that can prompt a discourse about architecture itself.

"Without Great Architecture We Are Nothing": Behind the Scenes with Edmund Sumner

Naila House. Photo: © Edmund Sumner© Edmund SumnerNeelham Cinema. Photo: © Edmund Sumner © Edmund SumnerInagawa Cemitery. Photo: © Edmund Sumner © Edmund SumnerNaila House. © Edmund Sumner+ 9

At ArchDaily, we always aspire to provide our community with all the tools and knowledge to help imagine, design, and build better cities. In order to bring inspiration and present more about what goes on beyond a complete project, we are launching a new series titled “Behind the Scenes”, where we showcase the work of visionary photographers, artists, and curators, and ask some questions that allow them to share more of what they do with the world. In every episode, we will be sharing with you the answers, along with images and videos of their work. 

Kicking off the series is London-based architectural photographer Edmund Sumner.

Tales from the Loop: Filmmaker Jeff Durkin Captures San Diego Architecture

The COVID-19 pandemic quickly shuttered the doors of businesses, schools and workplaces across the world. From telecommuting to virtual events, cities have experienced less noise, traffic and pollution. Filmmaker and Director Jeff Durkin of Breadtruck Films recently began to capture these quiet moments on the University of California San Diego campus. Taking inspirations from science fiction series Tales from the Loop, he set out with his children to explore over 100 acres of modern architecture.

© Breadtruck Films© Breadtruck Films© Breadtruck Films© Breadtruck Films+ 11

Explore Madrid's Design Studios Through the Lens of Marc Goodwin

Architectural photographer Marc Goodwin recently visited Madrid to continue his journey documenting diverse architecture studios and design offices. He has visited many cities and countries around the world, including Brazil, Panama City, the Netherlands, Dubai, London, Paris, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, the Nordic countries, Barcelona, Los Angeles and Istanbul. In Madrid, Marc photographed 16 intimate office spaces and a range of studios.

© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin+ 33

Discover Istanbul's Architecture Studios Through the Lens of Marc Goodwin

Architectural photographer Marc Goodwin recently visited Istanbul to continue his journey documenting the world's architecture offices. He has visited a range of cities and countries, including Brazil, Panama City, the Netherlands, Dubai, London, Paris, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, the Nordic countries, Barcelona, and Los Angeles. In Istanbul, Marc photographed 10 offices working across project types and scales. Discover the individual offices and the city through Marc's most recent feature.

© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin© Marc Goodwin+ 21

Liz Diller and Helene Binet Recognised in 2019 Women in Architecture Awards

Courtesy of The Architect's Journal
Courtesy of The Architect's Journal

Architect Liz Diller and architectural photographer Hélène Binet have been awarded the 2019 Jane Drew and Ada Louise Huxtable Prizes, respectively, for their exceptional contributions to the field of architecture. The prizes are part of the eighth edition of the Women in Architecture Awards founded jointly by The Architect's Journal and The Architectural Review.

Anthony Saroufim Captures the Skeletal Materiality of Santiago Calatrava's City of Arts and Sciences

© Anthony Saroufim
© Anthony Saroufim

The architectural and engineering feats of Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava can be admired around the world, but his City of Arts and Sciences, designed alongside Felix Candela, has remained a modern architectural marvel. Like many international visitors, Lebanese photographer Anthony Saroufim found himself inherently attracted to the highly publicized building complex with a specific, tailored angle - unraveling the relationship between the built reality and the people interacting with it.

© Anthony Saroufim© Anthony Saroufim© Anthony Saroufim© Anthony Saroufim+ 12

Andres Gallardo Studies Milan's Contrasting Typologies in Contemporary Architecture

Andres Gallardo’s photo series “Urban Geometries” continues, this time the self-taught photographer chose to capture the architecture of Milan. The series focuses on the architectural contours of contemporary structures, varying in both age and function while highlighting the materiality of the façades, architectural, industrial details of each building.

Gallardo’s Milan series features the work of Zaha Hadid Architects and Grafton Architects. Other images in the series include elements of the city that often go unnoticed, such as a series of colorful recycling receptacles.

© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo+ 14

What Are the Best Lenses for Architectural Photography? (Including Mobile)

In a world rapidly transitioning toward primarily digital content creation, more and more people are beginning to experiment with various digital media. There is undoubtedly an intimate relationship between architecture and photography, and many architects enjoy experimenting with taking pictures, both of their own work and of their surrounding environment. But how do you know if you have the right gear needed to start off on the right foot? And more importantly, how can you get the most out of your equipment?

In honor of World Photography Day this month, we have put together a helpful guide to get started with lenses for architectural photography. This guide will specifically highlight the best lenses (for both DSLR and mobile) to use for your shots and why.

Look Inside a Collection of Dutch Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin

Having previously assembled sets of images featuring the offices of architecture firms in Dubai, London, Paris, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, the Nordic countries, and Barcelona, architectural photographer Marc Goodwin continues the series with an exploration of 17 large and small offices in the Netherlands. Occupying buildings formerly used as offices, banks and old factories, the interior and exterior images capture a glimpse of the lives of these designers and their daily architectural surroundings.

Ricardo Bofill's La Muralla Roja Through the Lens of Andres Gallardo

Photographer Andres Gallardo, who has captured images of noted architectural works such as Zaha Hadid’s Dongdaemun Design Plaza and MAD Architects’ Harbin Opera House, has turned his lens on La Muralla Roja (The Red Wall) by Ricardo Bofill. Located in Spain’s Calpe region, the building plays on the popular architecture of the Arab Mediterranean Area, influenced by the Mediterranean tradition of the casbah.

In recent years, the 1968 development has extended its popularity beyond architectural circles, having been featured in the music video for Martin Solveig’s hit “Do It Right.” Gallardo’s photoset, which you can see below or on his website, zooms in on the sharp, clean-cut, vibrant form of the development, informed partly by shadows cast from the hot Mediterranean sun. Despite the somewhat exact and pristine nature of the development, Gallardo also captures details of human habitation and everyday life, such as plants, vehicles, and furniture.

© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo+ 19

Beauty or Tragedy? Aerial Imagery of Spain’s Abandoned Housing Estates Wins DJI Drone Photography Award

The winners of the DJI Drone Photography Award have been announced, a competition calling for ideas to make creative use of drone photography, and to explore subject matters impossible to experience on foot. This year, the two winning projects consisted of a new perspective on Spain’s 3.4 million abandoned houses, and the documentation of salt production across Europe.

"Sand Castles (part II)" by Markel Redondo. Image Courtesy of Markel Redondo"Sand Castles (part II)" by Markel Redondo. Image Courtesy of Markel Redondo"Sand Castles (part II)" by Markel Redondo. Image Courtesy of Markel Redondo"Sand Castles (part II)" by Markel Redondo. Image Courtesy of Markel Redondo+ 12

Oslo's Barcode Project Showcased in Stunning Photo Series by Rainer Taepper

© Rainer Taepper
© Rainer Taepper

Situated behind Snøhetta's iconic Oslo Opera House is another set of buildings which mark out Oslo as a cutting-edge architectural hub. The Barcode Project is a masterplanning project consisting of a row multi-purpose high-rise buildings which largely make up the skyline of Oslo. Each of the buildings is the creation of different combinations of European architecture firms; however, together they form an enticing composition with the gaps between them creating the impression of a barcode—hence the project’s clever nickname.

Each of the resulting buildings pushes the idea of what a high-rise building can be. Whether they take the form of a giant staircase or resemble a 3D version of Tetris, each of the buildings has its own peculiarities. The firms involved in the project included Dark Arkitekter, A-lab, MVRDV, and Snøhetta adding their stamp on the architecture of Oslo. Read on to see German architectural photographer Rainer Taepper’s stunning set of photographs on the Barcode Project.

© Rainer Taepper© Rainer Taepper© Rainer Taepper© Rainer Taepper+ 45

Georgia's Soviet Architectural Heritage Captured by Photographers Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego

Tbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte
Tbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte

The Republic of Georgia’s past is defined by turbulence and a struggle for identity. A former republic of the USSR, Georgia is perhaps best known as the birthplace of Joseph Stalin. The nation's history has been anything but calm, and remnants of the architectural past provide a glimpse into the nation that was.

The country's remaining Soviet landmarks give Georgia an air of being caught between the past and the present. Italian photographers Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego capture this in their photo series, Soviet Architecture Heritage in Georgia, with a compilation of photos that highlights the existing Soviet heritage in Georgian architecture today.

Tbilisi. Archaeological Museum (1988). Image © Stefano PeregoZhinvali. Aragveli monument. Image © Stefano PeregoTbilisi. Technical Library, by G. Bichiasshvili (1985). Image © Roberto ConteTbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte+ 12

Architectural Photographers: Ricardo Oliveira Alves

Tree Snake Houses / Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade. Image © Ricardo Oliveira Alves
Tree Snake Houses / Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade. Image © Ricardo Oliveira Alves

From architecture to music, directing and production, Portuguese photographer Ricardo Oliveira Alves worked in several different creative industries before combining his two biggest passions and starting his own architectural photography studio, Ricardo Oliveira Alves Architectural Photography, in 2010.

Alves captures emblematic national architecture projects in addition to work by prominent architects worldwide, “fusing the vision of the architect” with that of the photographer. He is also known for his “Archilapse” videos, which feature timelapse montages of architectural works.

Read an interview with Alves and view a selection of his images after the break. 

The Wall House / Guedes Cruz Arquitectos. Image © Ricardo Oliveira AlvesAlcoutins House / Guedes Cruz Arquitectos. Image © Ricardo Oliveira AlvesTree Snake Houses / Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade. Image © Ricardo Oliveira AlvesThe Wall House / Guedes Cruz Arquitectos. Image © Ricardo Oliveira Alves+ 19

Iwan Baan in Conversation with Jonathan Glancey

Iwan Baan was twelve years old when he received his first camera and, "within a week, [he] had traded it in for a better one." He is one of the most well-known and highly sought after architectural photographers in the world, recognised for shooting cities from above and for always highlighting people (occupation) in his images. In a short interview with Jonathan Glancey Baan is the first to state that he "doesn't know much about architecture" — something which has not inhibited his ability to produce some of the most successful photographs of the built world, and how we design, construct and occupy it.