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Evan Rawn

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Spotlight: Frei Otto

06:00 - 31 May, 2018
Spotlight: Frei Otto, Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn
Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn

German architect and structural engineer Frei Otto (31 May 1925 – 9 March 2015) was well known for his pioneering innovations in lightweight and tensile structures. Shortly before his death in 2015 he was awarded the Pritzker Prize and prior to that he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 2006. Much of his research in lightweight structures is as relevant today as when he first proposed them over 60 years ago, and his work continues to inform architects and engineers to this day.

German Pavilion, Expo ’67. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn Diplomatic Club Heart Tent. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn Aviary at the Munich Zoo. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn Japan Pavilion, Expo 2000. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn + 11

Spotlight: Adolf Loos

04:00 - 10 December, 2017
Spotlight: Adolf Loos, Goldman & Salatsch Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Looshaus_Michaelerplatz.JPG'>Wikimedia user Thomas Ledl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
Goldman & Salatsch Building. Image © Wikimedia user Thomas Ledl licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Adolf Loos (December 10, 1870 – August 23, 1933) was one of the most influential European architects of the late 19th century and is often noted for his literary discourse that foreshadowed the foundations of the entire modernist movement. As an architect, his influence is primarily limited to major works in what is now Austria and the Czech Republic, but as a writer he had a major impact on the development of 20th century architecture, producing a series of controversial essays that elaborated on his own architectural style by decrying ornament and a range of social ills. Adolf Loos’s minimalist attitudes are reflected in the works of Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and many other modernists and led to a fundamental shift in the way architects perceived ornamentation.

Spotlight: Paul Rudolph

06:00 - 23 October, 2017
University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth
University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth

One of the United States' leading architects of the Modernist era, Paul Marvin Rudolph (October 23, 1918 – August 8, 1997) was known for his contributions to modernism throughout the latter half of the 20th century. He served as the Chair of Yale University’s School of Architecture for six years and famously designed the Yale Art and Architecture Building, one of the earliest examples of Brutalist architecture in the United States.

University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth Milam Residence. Image © Casacara The Colonnade Condominiums. Image © Cooney-Hughes Orange County Government Center. Image © Matthew Carbone for Architect Magazine + 10

Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo

06:00 - 17 October, 2017
Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Yokohama International Passenger Terminal. Image © Satoru Mishima / FOA
Yokohama International Passenger Terminal. Image © Satoru Mishima / FOA

Alejandro Zaera-Polo (born October 17th 1963) is an internationally recognized architect and scholar, and founder of London, Zurich, and Princeton-based firm Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Maider Llaguno Architecture (AZPML). First rising to prominence in the 1980s with his writings for publications such as El Croquis, Zaera-Polo has had a prolific career in both the academic and professional realms of architecture.

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

07:30 - 2 October, 2017
Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels, 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan
2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Denmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010. Image © Iwan Baan VM Houses / BIG + JDS. Image Courtesy of BIG Danish National Maritime Museum. Image © Rasmus Hjortshõj 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan + 23

Spotlight: Gunnar Asplund

06:00 - 22 September, 2017
Spotlight: Gunnar Asplund, Stockholm Public Library. Image © Sam Teigen
Stockholm Public Library. Image © Sam Teigen

As a professor of architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology, and a designer often cited for his contributions to Nordic Classicism, Swedish architect Gunnar Asplund (September 22 1885 – 20 October 1940) was a notable theorist on the most important architectural challenges of his time, first exemplified by his lecture entitled “Our Architectonic Concept of Space.”

Stockholm Public Library. Image © Sam Teigen Stockholm Public Library. Image © Sam Teigen Stockholm Public Library. Image © Sam Teigen Gothenburg City Hall Expansion. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gothenburg%27s_city_hall.jpg'>Wikimedia user pruxo</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 5

Material Masters: The Traditional Tiles of Wang Shu & Lu Wenyu

10:30 - 3 June, 2015
Material Masters: The Traditional Tiles of Wang Shu & Lu Wenyu, via www.ilgiornaledellarchitettura.com (image of Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu) and © Iwan Baan (image of Ningbo Historic Museum)
via www.ilgiornaledellarchitettura.com (image of Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu) and © Iwan Baan (image of Ningbo Historic Museum)

Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu of Amateur Architecture Studio are known for their distinctly contextual attitudes towards design which prize tradition and timelessness above anything else. In many cases, their use of materials is governed by local availability of salvaged building elements. Tiles, in particular, represent a material used repeatedly by Amateur Architecture studio and for Wang Shu, who won the 2012 Pritzker Prize, they offer a political as well as an architectural message.

The Architectural Lab: A History Of World Expos

10:30 - 30 April, 2015
The Universal Exposition of 1889. Image © Wikimedia Commons
The Universal Exposition of 1889. Image © Wikimedia Commons

World Expos have long been important in advancing architectural innovation and discourse. Many of our most beloved monuments were designed and constructed specifically for world’s fairs, only to remain as iconic fixtures in the cities that host them. But what is it about Expos that seem to create such lasting architectural landmarks, and is this still the case today? Throughout history, each new Expo offered architects an opportunity to present radical ideas and use these events as a creative laboratory for testing bold innovations in design and building technology. World’s fairs inevitably encourage competition, with every country striving to put their best foot forward at almost any cost. This carte blanche of sorts allows architects to eschew many of the programmatic constraints of everyday commissions and concentrate on expressing ideas in their purest form. Many masterworks such as Mies van der Rohe’s German Pavilion (better known as the Barcelona Pavilion) for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition are so wholeheartedly devoted to their conceptual approach that they could only be possible in the context of an Exposition pavilion.

To celebrate the opening of Expo Milano 2015 tomorrow, we’ve rounded up a few of history’s most noteworthy World Expositions to take a closer look at their impact on architectural development.

1964 New York World’s Fair . Image via People for the Pavillion website Buckminster Fuller's Dome. Image © Flickr user abdallahh Barcelona Pavilion. Image © Gili Merin Kiyonari Kikutake's Landmark Tower + 19

From Prisons to Parks: How the US Can Capitalize On Its Declining Prison Populations

10:30 - 24 April, 2015
From Prisons to Parks: How the US Can Capitalize On Its Declining Prison Populations , The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram
The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram

Prisons are often seen as problematic for their local communities. After centuries of correctional facilities discouraging economic growth and occupying valuable real estate as a necessary component of towns and cities, many of these institutions have been relocated away from city centers and their abandoned vestiges are left as unpleasant reminders of their former use. In fact, the majority of prisons built in the United States since 1980 have been placed in non-metropolitan areas and once served as a substantial economic development strategy in depressed rural communities. [1] However, a new pressure is about to emerge on the US prison systems: beginning in 2010, America's prison population declined for the first time in decades, suggesting that in the near future repurposing these structures will become a particularly relevant endeavor for both community development and economic sustainability. These abandoned shells offer architects valuable opportunities to reimagine programmatic functions and transform an otherwise problematic location into an integral neighborhood space.

Why repurpose prisons rather than starting fresh? The answer to this question lies in the inherent architectural features of the prison typology, namely the fact that these structures are built to last. People also often forget that prison buildings are not limited to low-rise secure housing units - in fact, prisons feature an array of spaces that have great potential for reuse including buildings for light industrial activity, training or office buildings, low-security housing, and large outdoor spaces. These elements offer a wide variety of real estate for new programmatic uses, and cities around the world have begun to discover their potential. What could the US learn from these examples, at home and overseas?

The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram Boston's Liberty Hotel Interior. Image © Flickr CC user adewale_oshineye Aerial view of the former Lorton Prison. Image via Bing Maps Freedom Park in Lagos, Nigeria. Image via lagosfreedompark.com + 9

Corporate Dystopia: Liam Young Imagines a World in which Tech Companies Own Our Cities

10:30 - 2 April, 2015

What if the manufacturers of the phones and social networks we cling to became the rulers of tomorrow’s cities? Imagine a world in which every building in your neighborhood is owned by Samsung, entire regions are occupied by the ghosts of our digital selves, and cities spring up in international waters to house outsourced laborers. These are the worlds imagined by self-described speculative architect, Liam Young in his latest series of animations entitled ”New City.” Read on after the break to see all three animations and learn more about what’s next in the series.

From "The City in the Sea". Image Courtesy of Liam Young From "Keeping up Appearances". Image Courtesy of Liam Young From "Keeping up Appearances". Image Courtesy of Liam Young From "The Edgelands". Image Courtesy of Liam Young + 8

LOBBY #2: Projecting Forward, Looking Back

09:30 - 27 March, 2015
LOBBY #2: Projecting Forward, Looking Back, © Cameron Clarke
© Cameron Clarke

From Vitruvius to Le Corbusier, words and writing have always played an essential role in architectural discourse. One could argue that crafting words is akin to orchestrating space: indeed, history’s most notable architects and designers are often remembered for their written philosophies as much as they are for their built works.

With the exception of a few of architecture’s biggest names, the majority of practicing architects no longer exploit the inherent value writing offers as a means for spatial and theoretical communication. This trend is exacerbated by the fact that many architectural schools place little emphasis on the once-primary subjects of history and literature, resulting in a generation of architects who struggle to articulate their ideas in words, resulting in an ever-growing proliferation of ill-defined “archispeak.”

LOBBY is an attempt from students of London’s Bartlett School of Architecture to reclaim the potency of the written word, presenting in their second issue an ambitious array of in-house research and external contributions. The theme is Clairvoyance, and the journal seeks to investigate the ways in which architects are forced to constantly grapple with the possibilities and uncertainties of designing spaces that exist in the intangible realm of the world-to-be.

© Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke + 11

Digitized Stone: ZAarchitects Develop “Smart Masonry”

09:30 - 13 March, 2015
Digitized Stone: ZAarchitects Develop “Smart Masonry”, Courtesy of ZAarchitects
Courtesy of ZAarchitects

When one hears the term masonry architecture, digital fabrication and automated construction processes are probably not the first ideas to come to mind. By its very nature, the architecture produced with stone masonry is often heavy, massive, and incorporates less natural light than alternative methods. However, with their research proposal for "Smart Masonry," ZAarchitects are proposing to change masonry buildings as we know them and open opportunities for digital fabrication techniques in stone and other previously antiquated materials. Read on after the break to get a glimpse of what these new masonry buildings could look like and learn more about the process behind their construction.

Courtesy of ZAarchitects Courtesy of ZAarchitects Courtesy of ZAarchitects Courtesy of ZAarchitects + 11

Unreal Visualizations: 3 Pros and 3 Cons of Rendering with a Video Game Engine

09:30 - 10 March, 2015

In recent years, we've reached a point where visualizations have become all-prevalent in the architectural profession. Whether we like it or not, stylized imagery is seen as a commodity, and ultimately, renderings win competitions and commissions. Architects have become enamored with beautiful renderings because clients understand pictures better than plans, and yet, the tools used to produce these glitzy images are changing faster than our industry can keep up. But with technology constantly evolving, we may face a new wave of visualization techniques, as the same render engines used to produce the tantalizingly realistic visuals in movies and video games are, for the first time, easily within our reach.

The lines across industries are blurring and companies behind the rendering engines for the most popular video games are now marketing their software directly to architects. This year, the original developers of the game Gears of War have made their proprietary rendering software Unreal Engine 4 free to architects, and many other video game render engines are available for less than the cost of those used by architects. Founder Tim Sweeney believes that the world of visualization is changing, telling The Verge "We’re realizing now that Unreal Engine 4 is a common language between all these common fields." Creating a common language between the presently disparate fields of architecture, film, and video games, for example, suggests that the industries themselves may begin to hybridize and learn from one another. For instance, video game developers may look to architects to understand how to construct 3D buildings, while architects may learn from the navigable virtual environment of video games in order to discover new means of representation. Add to this the fact that these software packages are capable of producing lifelike animated walkthroughs and we are left wondering, why is this not an industry standard? Read on after the break for the pros and cons of being an early adopter.

"A Truman Show-Style Nightmare"? Critics React to BIG and Heatherwick's Designs for Google

10:30 - 5 March, 2015
"A Truman Show-Style Nightmare"? Critics React to BIG and Heatherwick's Designs for Google, © Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio
© Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio

In their designs for Google's new headquarters, released last week amid much excitement, Bjarke Ingels and Thomas Heatherwick have taken cues from the utopian visions of the past to create a radical solution for the sprawling tech campus in Mountain View, California. Citing the lack of identifiable architecture in the technology sector, a promotional video on Google’s own blog reveals how the company plans to embrace nature, community, and flexibility with the new scheme.

Chief among the company’s concerns was creating a building capable of adapting to future uses in addition to serving as a neighborhood-enhancing environment to welcome visitors from the surrounding community. As with any news related to Google, the design has already attracted the attention of the media - read on after the break for our rundown of the most salient reviews so far.

© Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio © Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio © Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio © Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio + 10

The Robot Revolution: Coop Himmelb(l)au Founder Wolf D. Prix on the Future of Construction

09:30 - 3 March, 2015

With a recently released animation entitled “We Start the Future of Construction,” Coop Himmelb(l)au announced their intention to take digital fabrication to a radical new scale, demonstrating how technology is impacting almost every aspect of the architectural profession. The advent of building information modeling and other modeling software has transformed how architects and engineers navigate the construction process, allowing us to achieve increasingly complex forms that can be modeled with the aid of CNC machining and 3D Printing, but still there remains a wide gap between the technologies available to architects and those employed by builders. When it comes to a building’s actual construction we have been limited by the great costs associated with non-standard components and labor - but now, the automated practices that transformed manufacturing industries could revolutionize how we make buildings.

Last week, ArchDaily sat down with co-founder, Design Principal and CEO of Coop Himmelb(l)auWolf D. Prix for his thoughts on the future of construction and the role of the architect in an increasingly technological practice. Read on after the break to find out how robots could impact architectural design, construction, and the future of the profession.

Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au + 8

Frank Lloyd Wright and Fay Jones on the Web: The Value of Online Exhibitions

09:30 - 27 February, 2015
Frank Lloyd Wright and Fay Jones on the Web: The Value of Online Exhibitions , Alexander Residence (Raheen) Swimming Pool. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries
Alexander Residence (Raheen) Swimming Pool. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries

Yesterday afternoon, I was able to visit the University of Arkansas exhibition “Fay Jones and Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture Comes to Arkansas” - without purchasing a ticket or leaving my apartment. This extensive exhibition on the life and development of these two notable architects was made possible through a collaboration between University of Arkansas Libraries’ Special Collections and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art Library and Archives. Exhibitions such as this are part of a broader movement in recent years towards making archived content more easily accessible to the public through web platforms. The concept of the online exhibition, however, is still in its infancy and there remains significant room for innovation.

Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries Taliesin West Easter Celebration with Kamal Amini, Jack Howe, Lu Sparks Howe, and Gus Jones. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries Page 1 of Jones's Notes for a Lecture Referring to His Last Conversation with Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries Bachman-Wilson Residence Exterior, Rear Elevation. Image Courtesy of TarantinoSTUDIO © 2014 + 5

Peripeteia: Exploring Space Colonization through Architecture

00:00 - 14 February, 2015
Peripeteia: Exploring Space Colonization through Architecture , © Luis Daniel Pozo
© Luis Daniel Pozo

Long after earth’s first journey to the moon, the idea of space colonization has continued to fascinate us. It is a subject repeated in countless science fiction works and even architectural proposals. For designers, this new frontier is seen as a tantalizing subject for exploration and will likely generate entirely new typologies for inhabitation. These fascinations formed the basis for Luis Daniel Pozo’s Diploma Project at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, from which he developed possible prototypes for “the city above the skies.”

© Luis Daniel Pozo © Luis Daniel Pozo © Luis Daniel Pozo © Luis Daniel Pozo + 20

A TUDelft Student Asks: "Can We Live With Zero Wasted Space?"

01:00 - 8 February, 2015
A TUDelft Student Asks: "Can We Live With Zero Wasted Space?", Courtesy of Stavros Gargaretas
Courtesy of Stavros Gargaretas

Architectural space as we know it is left largely empty even when it is inhabited. We have become accustomed to this empty space, take it for granted, and most likely could not imagine a life in which we are forced to occupy only the space that we use. Through cataloguing our everyday activities and analyzing our body movements, Stavros Gargaretas of Why Factory studio at TUDelft sought to examine the question of ultimate space efficiency with a project entitled “The Evolving Room: Inhabiting Zero Wasted Space.” The work was completed under the supervision of Ulf Hackauf, Adrian Ravon and Huib Plomp, along with Why Factroy founder Winy Maas and won TUDelft's Best Graduation Project of the Faculty of Architecture award.

© Sean Pieters Courtesy of Stavros Gargaretas © Martina Lucchese © Martina Lucchese + 25