With Recent Innovations, Where Will Elevators Take Us Next?

09:30 - 27 May, 2016
With Recent Innovations, Where Will Elevators Take Us Next?

Many technological advancements have changed the way we design in the past 150 years, but perhaps none has had a greater impact than the invention of the passenger elevator. Prior to Elisha Otis’ design for the elevator safety brake in 1853, buildings rarely reached 7 stories. Since then, buildings have only been growing taller and taller. In 2009, the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, maxed out at 163 floors (serviced by Otis elevators). Though a century and half separates those milestones, in that time elevator technology has actually changed relatively little - until recently.

Call for Entries: Laka Competition ‘16—Architecture that Reacts

21:41 - 3 May, 2016
Call for Entries: Laka Competition ‘16—Architecture that Reacts, Laka Competition: Architecture that Reacts '16
Laka Competition: Architecture that Reacts '16

Laka Architektura invites designers from around the world to submit their ideas of architecture that reacts. That means architecture which is able to respond and adjust dynamically to the current needs and circumstances. These circumstances are often unpredictable, but their consequences can be crucial. The architecture that reacts is the architecture that lives as a living organism, since it responds to the external stimuli and it develops because of it—to react is to live.

Civilization in Perspective: Capturing the World From Above

04:00 - 20 April, 2016
Civilization in Perspective: Capturing the World From Above, Forbidden City, Beijing, China. Image Courtesy of Daily Overview. © Satellite images 2016, DigitalGlobe, Inc
Forbidden City, Beijing, China. Image Courtesy of Daily Overview. © Satellite images 2016, DigitalGlobe, Inc

As recently as a century ago the idea of viewing the world from above was little more than a fantasy: the airplane was still in its infancy, with rocketry and satellites still decades into the future. Those who could not take to the air had no recourse but drawing in order to represent their world from an aerial perspective. This limitation is difficult to imagine today when access to plan photography is never further than the nearest Internet connection. Anyone with a smartphone has, in essence, the entire world in their pocket.

Viral Voices V: Architecture in Motion

12:15 - 4 April, 2016
Viral Voices V: Architecture in Motion

The panel will explore architecture through media in motion. It will look at how the field has evolved in the social media age, through the introduction of various technologies such as film and virtual reality, and business models, such as crowdsourcing. Viral Voices V will look at architecture as the intersection of environment, technology, and design, and how it will influence the new careers of tomorrow.

Will Your Building Withstand the Onslaught of the Technium?

09:30 - 25 March, 2016
Will Your Building Withstand the Onslaught of the Technium?, Spain and Portugal seen from space. Image © Flickr user NASA Goddard Space Flight Center licensed under CC BY 2.0
Spain and Portugal seen from space. Image © Flickr user NASA Goddard Space Flight Center licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Technium is the sphere of visible technology and intangible organizations that form what we think of as modern culture.
—Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants

The Technium is ubiquitous; like air it could be invisible. Fortunately, raging torrents that affect every person on earth are hard to ignore. Let’s look into one of the hearts of the Technium, that organ we call architecture.

You Are in the Technium Now

An ecosystem is a system of inter-dependent organisms and conditions. Ecosystems evolve. The current system can only exist because of past systems, each a stepping stone for new levels of action, each creating new sets of conditions, niches for life in its many forms.

But of course that’s what architecture does: it creates new conditions for life and culture, as does science, education, art and technology. Our culture and technology is evolving, enabled and built upon current and past developments. Kevin Kelly uses the word Technium to describe this complex stratum of evolving interdependencies and capacities. The Technium is evolving and growing fast. Our buildings must also evolve if they are to nurture our current and future cultures.

DISTRIBUTE! HACK 2016

07:40 - 25 March, 2016
DISTRIBUTE! HACK 2016

Time Inc, NBBJ, and PowerToFly have partnered to host a global hackathon in Seattle, New York, and London. Teams will compete to invent the future of the distributed workplace; building products to encourage collaboration, connection, and culture flow. Prizes will include in-kind tech donation and an installation of the winning work.

The Shape of the Future City: A Conversation with Carlo Ratti and Natalie Jeremijenko

18:28 - 15 March, 2016
The Shape of the Future City: A Conversation with Carlo Ratti and Natalie Jeremijenko

The advancement of contemporary technology is changing the way we study the world around us. The way we describe and understand cities is being radically transformed, along with the tools we use to envision and impact their physical form.

These new technologies allow us to understand the built environment differently. The city is no longer a static collection of built objects, but can instead be understood as a series of social, environmental, and informational networks. Can we this new knowledge to positively impact the city of the future? Can these technologies allow us to rectify the mistakes of the past? What new possibilities exist within their creative use?

"Array of Things" is A Ray of Hope for Big-Data-Based Urban Design

09:30 - 3 March, 2016
"Array of Things" is A Ray of Hope for Big-Data-Based Urban Design, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

For a number of years now, Smart Cities and Big Data have been heralded as the future of urban design, taking advantage of our connected, technological world to make informed decisions on urban design and policy. But how can we make sure that we're collecting the best data? In this story, originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "'Array' of Possibilities: Chicago’s New Wireless Sensor Networks to Create an Urban Internet of Things," Matt Alderton looks at a new initiative in Chicago to collect and publish data in a more comprehensive way than ever before.

If it hasn’t already, your daily routine will soon undergo a massive makeover.

For starters, when your alarm clock goes off, it will tell your coffeemaker to start brewing your morning joe. Then, when you’re on the way to work, your car will detect heavy traffic and send a text message to your boss, letting her know you’ll be late. When you arrive, you’ll print out the agenda for today’s staff meeting, at which point your printer will check how much ink it has left and automatically order its own replacement cartridges.

At lunch, you’ll think about dinner and use your smartphone to start the roast that’s waiting in your slow cooker at home. And when you come home a few hours later, your house will know you’re near, automatically turning on the lights, the heat, and the TV—channel changed to the evening news—prior to your arrival. It will be marvelous, and you’ll owe it all to the Internet of Things (IoT).

Have Your Portrait Done in the Style of Your Favorite Architect-Artist with DeepArt

11:20 - 20 February, 2016
Have Your Portrait Done in the Style of Your Favorite Architect-Artist with DeepArt, Based on Quake City by Lebbeus Woods (1995). Image Courtesy of Daniel Voshart
Based on Quake City by Lebbeus Woods (1995). Image Courtesy of Daniel Voshart

"Pardon my face," says designer Daniel Voshart in the opening to his latest blog post on Medium, "I’ve been throwing things into DeepArt’s algorithm for a few hours and the results are surprisingly good."

DeepArt is an online service created by Leon Gatys, Alexander Ecker and Matthias Bethge, Łukasz Kidziński and Michał Warchoł. It uses a neural network algorithm to combine the subject of one image with the style of another. It seems particularly adept at applying striking, abstract art styles to photographic images, which means that many of the twentieth century's most celebrated architect-artists are perfectly suited to it. So, if you've ever wondered what your portrait (or indeed anything else) might look like when drawn by Le Corbusier, Lebbeus Woods, or Daniel Libeskind, now might be the perfect time to find out. Voshart has kindly shared his examples of what DeepArt can do - read on to see more.

Open Call: Digital Design Methods Competition

10:50 - 8 February, 2016
Open Call: Digital Design Methods Competition

A very exciting opportunity is presented to architects and students worldwide for your work to be showcased in an international documentary film, alongside some of the greatest living architects of our current time.

We are seeking examples of architectural projects which exemplify the use of advanced and dynamic digital techniques in the process of analysis, design exploration and final outcome of a design work.

One or a combination of several computer-based tools must have been implemented in the processes of data collection/ information processing, simulation and development about the project and be evident in early stages of the design as well as the final work. We are looking for contemporary, cutting edge uses of computer technology from pre-existing or new design projects.

Event: Conscious Cities Conference

13:00 - 4 February, 2016
Event: Conscious Cities Conference

Conscious Cities is a one-day conference organised by MoA and THECUBE that aims to explore the relationship between neuroscience and architecture. By bringing together neuroscientists, architects, engineers, planners and developers, the conference aims to offer necessary tools for understanding how the built environment impacts our cognitive functions, while also showing how professionals can use research in neuroscience to design better spaces and cities for the future.

Event: Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2016

18:00 - 2 February, 2016
Event: Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2016

Bringing the world’s top designers and business leaders together to discover how design makes the world better, smarter, cooler, and more innovative. Bloomberg Businessweek Design highlights the intersection of design, technology and business. The day-long event draws attendees from every industry that relies on design—social media, ecommerce, graphic design, robotics, nanotechnology, data visualization, genomics, architecture and fashion. Learn more and purchase tickets, here

Call For Submissions: [TRANS-] lation

06:40 - 12 January, 2016
Call For Submissions: [TRANS-] lation

ABOUT :: [TRANS-] is a critically-reviewed academic journal published in print and online, inviting expressions of interest for submitting works of design, writing, or multi-media on the topic of design process and design communication for Vol. No. 2 to be published in May 2016.

TOPIC ::
In the second volume, [TRANS-] will explore the topic of [TRANS-]lation.
In a largely results-based society, how do designers evaluate process? How can a more thorough assessment of the translation that occurs during creative activities make us better communicators and collaborators with end users, consultants, clients, and all others we affect through design?

ELIGIBILITY ::
[TRANS-] accepts submissions from

Tech, Big Data, and the Future of Retail Design

10:00 - 25 November, 2015
Tech, Big Data, and the Future of Retail Design, The new Watches of Switzerland store in London designed by Callison. Image Courtesy of Callison
The new Watches of Switzerland store in London designed by Callison. Image Courtesy of Callison

With the rise of the internet, old-fashioned brick-and-mortar stores have struggled, as online ordering services have increasingly made it unnecessary to actually go to a store. The answer for the physical stores of the future? Make spaces not for purchasing the things people need, but experiencing the things people want, as explored in this article by Matt Alderton originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "How Technology and Big Data in Retail Are Shaping Store Designs of the Future." Alderton looks at how forward-looking stores are being designed to appeal to customers, finding that the same technology revolution that threatened to make stores obsolete might also play a key role in saving them, too.

Shopping used to be stimulating. Although its end was sales, its means was a mix of status and spectacle. It was social commerce in which partakers transacted not just cash, but also cachet.

Nowhere was this more evident than in the earliest department stores, whose architects designed them to be destinations. In London, for instance, Harrods boasts the motto “Omnia, Omnibus, Ubique”—Latin for “All Things for All People, Everywhere.” Established in 1849, it has seven floors, comprising more than 1 million square feet across more than 330 departments. The store installed one of the world’s first escalators in 1898, opened a world-famous food hall in 1902, and sold exotic pets such as lion cubs until the 1970s.

Takhassussi Patchi Shop by Lautrefabrique Architectes. Image © Luc Boegly dpHUE Concept Store by Julie Snow Architects. Image © Paul Crosby Owen Launch by Tacklebox Architecture. Image © Juliana Sohn for OWEN Designed by Callison, the new Watches of Switzerland store in London features an interactive touch screen. Image Courtesy of Callison +8

Digifest 2016: Future5 Talks Call for Proposals

08:35 - 8 November, 2015
Digifest 2016: Future5 Talks Call for Proposals, FUTURE5 Talks
FUTURE5 Talks

Digifest explores the future of design—how is technology changing the way we create, and what this means for our future.

We invite proposals on topics for discussion on the themes:

Design | Technology | Entrepreneurship

15-minute presentations followed by 5 minutes Q&A.

Please provide a 250-word abstract summarizing your talk. Indicate if you are presenting case studies, theory, personal experiences, etc.

Examples of topics for discussion:

- How does art, design, architecture, fashion, food or music and technology intersect and improve our lives?
- Examples of creative leadership.
- Projects that think creatively and strategically in the digital age.
- Examples of social design impacting business, society, government

ThyssenKrupp and Microsoft's MAX Elevator Will Save Users Years of Waiting

14:00 - 1 November, 2015
ThyssenKrupp and Microsoft's MAX Elevator Will Save Users Years of Waiting, © ThyssenKrupp
© ThyssenKrupp

German mechanical company ThyssenKrupp, in collaboration with Microsoft, has launched its newest innovational elevator, MAX. Together, the companies have created an elevator that could create time savings for elevator passengers “equivalent to 108 centuries of new availability in each year of operation." 

Installation: JB1.0: Jamming Bodies

04:00 - 15 October, 2015
Installation: JB1.0: Jamming Bodies, "JB1.0: Jamming Bodies", 2015. Lucy McRae and Skylar Tibbits with MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab. Storefront for Art and Architecture.
"JB1.0: Jamming Bodies", 2015. Lucy McRae and Skylar Tibbits with MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab. Storefront for Art and Architecture.

"JB1.0: Jamming Bodies" is an immersive installation that transforms Storefront’s gallery space into a laboratory. The installation, a collaboration between science fiction artist Lucy McRae and architect and computational designer Skylar Tibbits with MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab, explores the relationship between human bodies and the matter that surrounds them.

United States Allocates $160 Million to Smart Cities Initiative

08:00 - 24 September, 2015
United States Allocates $160 Million to Smart Cities Initiative, © Lacitta Vila
© Lacitta Vila

In the continuing quest for smarter cities, the White House has announced the dedication of 160-million dollars toward the integration of sensors and data collection in cities across the United States. The new initiative strives to produce better, real-time data for local organizations, companies and governments to improve responses, both in time and effectiveness. The initiative broadly covers various organizations and federal grants, but hopes to address issues like crime, traffic congestion and climate change. Read more after the break.