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Bridges & Highways Engineering & Maintenance Summit

14:10 - 23 August, 2016
Bridges & Highways Engineering & Maintenance Summit

Bridges and Highways infrastructure development have rapidly escalated in recent years in Asia Pacific, constituting 60% of the global market. Demand is largely driven by the availability of government road building funds, urbanization growth, and the need to replace or repair aging infrastructure. The Engineering and Maintenance components play a vital role in bridges & highways development as they are key to overall safety, project management and delivery of bridge and highway project and on a larger scale, a reflection of the country’s infrastructure plans and reputation.

Skyscrapers Asia Summit 2017

14:02 - 23 August, 2016
Skyscrapers Asia Summit 2017

Year on year, we are seeing Asia drastically outperforming all other regions in Skyscraper construction. For example, in 2015, 81 of the 106 completions were constructed in Asia.

A direct consequence of Asia’s Economy Growth, Rapid Urbanization and a Tremendous Appetite to build the Smartest, Most Asthetic and Tallest Buildings in the world, going forward it looks like it is no different as another record breaking year of skyscrapers completion is expected to take place in Asia.

Be sure not to miss out Equip Global’s leading Skyscrapers Asia Summit 2017.

Repurposed Material Creates Distinct Felt Tile Patterns that Provide Sound Control

08:00 - 22 August, 2016
Courtesy of FilzFelt
Courtesy of FilzFelt

Architecture Research Office and FilzFelt have teamed up to create ARO Block, a series of modular acoustic tiles that provide sound control in a customizable, easy-to-install system. Generated from remnant material of FilzFelt’s CNC cut products, which are often times small, ARO Block not only creates distinct felt tile patterns but also prevents leftover fabric from going to waste.

How to Integrate the 12 Principles of Permaculture to Design a Truly Sustainable Project

07:00 - 22 August, 2016

The 12 principles published here are explained in detail in the book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, by David Holmgren.

In 1978, Australian ecologists David Holmgren and Bill Mollison coined for the first time the concept of permaculture as a systematic method. For Mollison, "permaculture is the philosophy of working with and not against nature, after a long and thoughtful observation." [1] Meanwhile, Holmgren defines the term as "those consciously designed landscapes which simulate or mimic the patterns and relationships observed in natural ecosystems." [2] 

In 2002, Holmgren published the book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, defining 12 design principles that can be used as a guide when generating sustainable systems. These principles can be applied to all daily processes in order to humanize those processes, increase efficiency, and in the long term ensure the survival of mankind.

What if we apply them to the design process of an architectural project?

Architensions Shortlisted for Civic Center Design Using Local Vegetation in Sydney, Australia

16:00 - 20 August, 2016
Architensions Shortlisted for Civic Center Design Using Local Vegetation in Sydney, Australia, Courtesy of Architensions
Courtesy of Architensions

New-York-based studio Architensions has released the design for its shortlisted project, Rising Ryde, for the Ryde Civic Center in Sydney, Australia. In an effort to embrace local communities and contexts, the project is conceived as a hill-shaped building covered in local vegetation and it aims to prioritize people through its complex system of social connections and interactions with nature.

Courtesy of Architensions Courtesy of Architensions Courtesy of Architensions Courtesy of Architensions +10

AA School of Architecture Designs Adaptable Structural Plastic 3D Printing Method

06:00 - 15 August, 2016
AA School of Architecture Designs Adaptable Structural Plastic 3D Printing Method, Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture
Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture

The AA School of Architecture’s DRL Masters Program has developed a thesis project, entitled Growing Systems, which explores adaptable building systems using methods of robotic fabrication and generative special printing within the context of housing.

Centered on a new method of structural 3D vertical extrusion, the project combines the precision of prefabricated elements with the adaptability of on-site fabrication, in response to the flux and dynamism of cities. The method becomes a system of elasticity that can accommodate site parameters, as well as future adjustments.

Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture +8

Miami’s Porsche Design Tower: A Bland Monument of Hubris in the Face of Climate Catastrophe

10:40 - 10 August, 2016

Florida is a state in denial. Miami is in the midst of one of the largest building booms in the region's history. Dense crane canopies pepper the city's skyline as they soar over forthcoming white, gold, and aqua clad "high end" residential and hotel towers. This massive stream of investment dollars is downright paradoxical considering the impending calamity that surrounds Southern Florida: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts that the sea level could likely increase almost 35 inches (0.89 meters) by mid-century. If current trends continue, that number is anticipated to rise to up to 80 inches (2.0 meters) by the year 2100, threatening the habitability of the entire metro area.

Given that harrowing scenario, Miami is either refusing to acknowledge the inevitable, or desperately trying to become relevant enough to be saved—not that saving the city is actually feasible. The region sits on extremely porous limestone which pretty much rules out the option of a Netherlands style sea wall. If the Atlantic couldn’t make any horizontal inroads, the rising tide would simply bubble up from below. Miami’s pancake topography doesn’t stand a chance.

Lyons and m3architecture Selected to Design Sustainable Futures Building at the University of Queensland, Australia

16:00 - 7 August, 2016
Lyons and m3architecture Selected to Design Sustainable Futures Building at the University of Queensland, Australia, Courtesy of Lyons and m3architecture
Courtesy of Lyons and m3architecture

Firms Lyons and m3architecture have been selected to design the Sustainable Futures Building at the St Lucia campus of the University of Queensland.

The new building will house the School of Chemical Engineering, and is intended to amplify the University’s profile as a hub of chemical engineering leadership in Australia, the Asia-Pacific region, and a global stage.

These Everyday Household Items Convert Light Into Energy

08:00 - 7 August, 2016
These Everyday Household Items Convert Light Into Energy, Courtesy of Caventou
Courtesy of Caventou

London-based design firm Caventou has designed a series of “stained glass” everyday objects that turn daylight into electricity, even indoors.

Integrated with solar cells, Current Table and Current Window are both independent, intelligent power sources that function normally as household items.

Courtesy of Caventou Courtesy of Caventou Courtesy of Caventou Courtesy of Caventou +20

Margot Krasojevic Proposes Trolleybus Garden that Generates Electricity From the Movement of Vehicles

10:55 - 29 July, 2016
Margot Krasojevic Proposes Trolleybus Garden that Generates Electricity From the Movement of Vehicles, © Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević

Far from the common dismissal of Margot Krasojevic’s work as (in her own words) “parametric futurist crap,” her work has always revolved around concepts of sustainability. As she explained to ArchDaily last year, she aims to focus on the ways that sustainable technology “will affect not just an architectural language but create a cross disciplinary dialogue and superimpose a typology in light of the ever-evolving technological era.” For the second project in a series of three proposals for the city of Belgrade Serbia, the architect is proposing a “Trolleybus Garden” that functions as a waiting shelter and park while simultaneously harnessing kinetic movement to produce electricity.

© Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević +16

Hou de Sousa Completes Construction on Raise/Raze and Sticks

08:00 - 28 July, 2016
Hou de Sousa Completes Construction on Raise/Raze and Sticks, Courtesy of Hou de Sousa
Courtesy of Hou de Sousa

Hou de Sousa (Nancy Hou and Josh de Sousa) has completed construction on Raise/Raze and Sticks, two competition winners for temporary installations in Washington, DC and New York, respectively.

Through Raise/Raze, the firm reused plastic balls from Snarkitecture’s “The Beach” at the National Building Museum to create an installation in DC’s Dupont Underground, a contemporary arts and culture space repurposed from an abandoned trolley station. Raise/Raze opened on April 30, and closed on June 1.

Located at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens, New York, Sticks is a multi-purpose pavilion space made of standard dimension lumber and accented with scrap wood found on-site. The pavilion opened on July 9, and will close December 31.

Courtesy of Hou de Sousa Courtesy of Hou de Sousa Courtesy of Hou de Sousa Courtesy of Hou de Sousa +20

Early Career Researchers Conference: Architecture And Environmental Design ( AED)

15:55 - 27 July, 2016
Early Career Researchers Conference: Architecture And Environmental Design ( AED)

The Architectural and Environmental Design (AED) is created to be a platform for all early career researchers, practitioners and students from all around the world, helping them to share ideas, and to expand networks for scholars.

This Brooklyn Theater Renovation Shows You Don't Have to Choose Between Heritage and Sustainability

09:30 - 23 July, 2016
This Brooklyn Theater Renovation Shows You Don't Have to Choose Between Heritage and Sustainability, The exterior view of St. Ann’s Warehouse theater. Image Courtesy of Charcoalblue
The exterior view of St. Ann’s Warehouse theater. Image Courtesy of Charcoalblue

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings: Why a Theater Company Chose Resurrection (Not Demolition)."

For a ruined Civil War-era warehouse in Brooklyn, there may have been no better organization than an avant-garde theater group to think creatively about its future.

Situated in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge in the popular Dumbo neighborhood, the 1860 tobacco warehouse was crumbling and forgotten when St. Ann’s, a 36-year-old theater company that began life in another Brooklyn church, sought to renovate it for its first permanent home. Attaining energy efficiency in historic buildings is not just possible—it can be the most sustainable and aesthetic choice.

St. Ann’s, led by artistic director Susan Feldman, hired a building team that included Marvel ArchitectsBuroHappold Engineering; and Charcoalblue, a theater, lighting, and acoustics consultancy. The resulting 25,000-square-foot complex, St. Ann’s Warehouse, includes two versatile and changeable performance spaces, lobby and event areas, and a triangular garden (designed by landscape architects Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates).

Why Leaders in Altruistic Architecture Need to Drop the Ego

09:30 - 20 July, 2016
Why Leaders in Altruistic Architecture Need to Drop the Ego, Collège Mixte Le Bon Berger in Haiti, designed by Architecture for Humanity. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
Collège Mixte Le Bon Berger in Haiti, designed by Architecture for Humanity. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity

This article was originally published on Lance Hosey's Huffington Post blog as "A Darker Shade of Green."

Last week, Architectural Record reported that Architecture for Humanity (AFH), the nonprofit founded in 1999 to address humanitarian crises through building, is being sued for mismanagement of funds. On June 10th, a court-appointed trustee filed a complaint alleging that the co-founders, Cameron Sinclair and Kate Stohr, and the ten-person board of directors acted with gross negligence by shirking their fiduciary duties from 2012 through 2014. The specific charges relate to misusing charitable donations earmarked for specific purposes. This is the latest in a string controversies, beginning with the co-founders departing in 2013 and the organization declaring bankruptcy last year.

Traditional Indian Architecture Meets Contemporary Office Space in This Naturally-Lit Design by Studio Symbiosis

16:00 - 17 July, 2016

Studio Symbiosis Architects is amidst the construction process for Punjab Kesari Headquarters, an 18,000 square meter office space in Delhi NCR, India.

Designed as a fusion of traditional Indian architecture and contemporary office space, the main objective of the project is “to reduce heat gain and optimize façade opening ratio, ensuing no artificial lighting is required on a typical day.”

© Studio Symbiosis © Studio Symbiosis © Studio Symbiosis © Studio Symbiosis +12

Sustainable Neverland Was the Inspiration Behind group8asia's Dream Island in Seoul

12:00 - 17 July, 2016
Sustainable Neverland Was the Inspiration Behind group8asia's Dream Island in Seoul, Courtesy of group8asia
Courtesy of group8asia

Architecture and Urban Planning firm group8asia has won third prize in the Seoul Metropolitan Government competition for the design of Nodeul Island with its sustainable project Seoul Green Dot.

Nodeul Dream Island leads with the idea of Neverland in mind, and is designed as “a utopia where nature and serenity are abundant.” Here, it is hoped that environmental economy, and socially sustainable practices can be utilized to create a space to transform the dense urban fabric.

OSU Chemists Discover New Blue Pigment that Could Help Keep Buildings Cool

08:00 - 16 July, 2016
OSU Chemists Discover New Blue Pigment that Could Help Keep Buildings Cool, Mas Subramanian. Image Courtesy of Oregon State University
Mas Subramanian. Image Courtesy of Oregon State University

After discovering a vibrant new pigment of blue by accident, chemists at Oregon State University have brought the compound to market in the form of a paint that looks promising to architectural sustainability. 

While experimenting with materials to study applications for electronics in 2009, OSU chemist Mas Subramanian and his team mixed black manganese oxide with other chemicals and heated them to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Little did they know, one of their samples would turn into a brilliant blue color.

How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence

10:30 - 8 July, 2016
How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence, The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux
The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux

This article by Kira Gould was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Case for COTE's Obsolescence."

Recently the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment published, for the first time, a comprehensive report about the winners from the debut year (1997) through 2015: “Lessons from the Leading Edge.” Its lead author, a current COTE advisory board member, Lance Hosey, set out to review two decades of Top Ten winners as a group to see how performance is changing over time, how the winners size up (scale, cost, type), and more.

The result is a compelling report. It reveals that these high-performing projects skew small. That performance gains and metrics, particularly real-time performance metrics, are improving each year. That the leading projects tend to be expensive. On average, they come in at $537 per square foot. “The cost data shows us that we need more compelling examples of lower-cost, higher performance projects,” Hosey says. Clearly, more exemplars at greater scale, type, and cost variation would be beneficial to both the profession and the market.