We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Architecture News

Architecture News

When Architects Design Boats

Boats offer delightful distractions for a surprisingly large number of architects. So many in fact, that there seems to be something about boats that appeals specifically to those trained in architecture.

5 Things to Consider When Designing a High-Performance Façade

Façade is one of the most important factors in certain building types, that can completely transform the occupant experience and the energy performance of the building. The Whole Building Design Guide showcases that the facade can have up to 40% impact on the total energy use of the building. In addition to the energy use, the facades also significantly impact the occupant productivity withing a building and, of course, the appearance of the building. There are many factors that go into creating a high-performance façade. In this article, we outline the top 5 things a design team should consider.

Stefano Boeri Architetti Combines Architecture, Agriculture, and Aesthetics in Newly Unveiled Project

Stefano Boeri Architetti combined the concept of "Vertical Forest" and "Farm of agricultural industry" in its newly-unveiled urban vertical farm titled "Urban Vertical Farm of Brightfood". The project explored a new way of urban production in metropolitan areas by combining greenery, food production, and visual aesthetics in a 110,000 square-meter structure. In addition to its ecological features, the new urban agricultural complex offers commercial and office spaces in the vibrant city of Shanghai.

Courtesy of Lifang International Digital Technology Co., Ltd. Stefano Boeri ArchitettiCourtesy of Lifang International Digital Technology Co., Ltd. Stefano Boeri ArchitettiCourtesy of Lifang International Digital Technology Co., Ltd. Stefano Boeri ArchitettiCourtesy of Lifang International Digital Technology Co., Ltd. Stefano Boeri Architetti+ 15

The New Home of Creative Industries, London's Design District Opens It Doors to the Public

London’s Design District, the new purpose-built creative hub at the heart of the Greenwich Peninsula, opened its doors to the public and is set on becoming a prominent destination for the city’s creative community. Comprising 16 buildings designed by a collective of eight renowned architectural studios and with landscaping by Schulze+Grassov, the project aims to gather startups, artists and entrepreneurs across many industries, generating a vibrant new neighbourhood.

© Taran Wilkhu© Taran Wilkhu© Taran Wilkhu© Taran Wilkhu+ 22

The Quilmes' City: The Architecture of Argentina's Pre-Hispanic Settlements

One of the most advanced civilizations in Latin America, the Quilmes people inhabited what is today known as the Santa Maria Valley in the northwestern sector of the Tucumán province, in the center of the Calchaquíes Valleys. Their city contains remnants of village life from centuries ago, giving a clear view of life in the village from generations past, including the economy, religious sites, public and private spaces, and interactions with other civilizations. At its height, the Quilmes' city had 450,000 inhabitants prior to the Spanish invasion.

These settlements, built in the Calchaquíes Valleys since approximately the 10th century, are considered to be Argentina's first pre-Hispanic cities. Even though little remains of these cities, their ruins highlight a complex history of a material and spiritual culture ripe with social and economic advancements. 

Rethinking the Role of Experimental Cities in Combating Climate Change

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

In the evolving campaign to combat climate change, big and bold solutions are increasingly easy to find, from the conceptual “water smart city” and ecologist Allan Savory’s vision for greening the world’s deserts to NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to turn part of Governors Island into a “living laboratory” for climate research. Oyster reef restoration is occurring at nearly every critical junction along the eastern seaboard, from Florida to Maine. These are worthy efforts, and yet, when considered collectively, the onus for solving our climate crisis is being left largely to municipal governments and private actors, making most solutions piecemeal, at best. The success of one approach has little to no correlation with that of another. But what happens when all related solutions can be applied within a single, controlled ecosystem when environmentalism and urbanism are not at odds, but working in concert? Enter the experimental city.

Noise-Diminishing Systems that Seamlessly Integrate Into Design: Autex Acoustics

 | Sponsored Content

Autex Acoustics’ intelligent, sustainable solutions not only integrate into different architectural contexts, they also contribute to greater well-being and performance in working environments.

World's Greatest Places Include Revitalized Riverfronts, Affordable Artistic Incubators and Superlative City-States

Time magazine has released the World’s Greatest Places Of 2021, selecting 100 destinations from around the globe. With revitalized riverfronts, affordable artistic incubators, and superlative city-states, the list is a tribute to the built and natural environment that found a way “to adapt, build and innovate”, amidst the challenges of the past year.

Encompassing the world’s longest pedestrian suspension bridge, London’s Design District, new repurposed spaces in Helsinki, Historic gems in South Korea, and Hanoi’s renewed life in the old quarter, the World’s Greatest Places Of 2021 has a considerable selection of architectural destinations.

Ravensbourne University’s Institute for Creativity and Technology/ Barozzi Veiga- Design District, London. Image © Taran WilkhuJaipur, India. Image via Shutterstock/By SkreidzeleuCoimbra city in Portugal. Image via Shutterstock/ By RossHelenBeijing, China cityscape at the CBD.. Image via Shutterstock/  By ESB Professional+ 23

How to Design the Perfect Acoustic Enclosure: Comfort in Flooring, Ceilings, and Walls

As our cities densify and building types become more and more mixed-use, we tend to spend a lot of time in noisy environments. When we think about acoustic comfort, we rarely think of places like restaurants, venues, and big offices; places with a lot of people, machinery, and background noise. The quality of sound can entirely change the experience of people in an interior space, and improving the space's acoustic quality relies on treating all surfaces, from walls to ceilings, and flooring. In this article, we will present a variety of solutions for ceilings, flooring, and walls, their different combinations, and a simple guide of how to apply them correctly in public spaces without compromising the aesthetic of the interior.

RIBA Announces 2021 Stirling Prize Shortlist

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has revealed the six shortlisted buildings contending for this year's RIBA Stirling Prize. Celebrating its 25th year, the award is given to the United Kingdom's best new building. The selected buildings demonstrate "the innovation and ambition that lies at the heart of exceptional architecture", varying from a city mosque in Cambridge to a remote bridge in Cornwall and a vibrant gathering space in Kingston.

Windermere Jetty Museum. Image Courtesy of RIBATintagel Castle Footbridge. Image Courtesy of RIBA15 Clerkenwell Close. Image Courtesy of RIBAKey Worker Housing . Image Courtesy of RIBA+ 12

Thompson Center Design Competition Announces Winners

"Public Pool" by David Rader, Jerry Johnson, Ryan Monteleagre, and Matt Zelensek of Perkins&Will, Chicago. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition
"Public Pool" by David Rader, Jerry Johnson, Ryan Monteleagre, and Matt Zelensek of Perkins&Will, Chicago. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition

The Chicago Architecture Center and the Chicago Architectural Club have announced the three winning designs for the 2021 Chicago Prize Competition, which called for innovative adaptive reuse proposals that would grant a new life to the iconic Illinois Thompson Center. The winning proposals designed by Perkins&Will, Eastman Lee Architects, and Solomon Cordwell Buenz represent alternative visions for the future of the Postmodernist landmark.

"Offset: The Vertical Loop" by Tom Lee and Christopher Eastman of Eastman Lee Architects. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition"Public Pool" by David Rader, Jerry Johnson, Ryan Monteleagre, and Matt Zelensek of Perkins&Will, Chicago. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition"One Chicago School" by Jay Longo, James Michaels, Kaitlin Frankforter, Michael Quach, Abaan Zia, Mackenzie Anderson, Nicolas Waidele, Roberta Brucato, Zachary Michaliska of Solomon Cordwell Buenz, Chicago. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition"One Chicago School" by Jay Longo, James Michaels, Kaitlin Frankforter, Michael Quach, Abaan Zia, Mackenzie Anderson, Nicolas Waidele, Roberta Brucato, Zachary Michaliska of Solomon Cordwell Buenz, Chicago. Image Courtesy of Thompson Center Design Competition+ 16

Home Gardens: Residential Projects That Embrace Agriculture

Since before the first industrial revolution, sociologists, historians, and urban planners have been addressing the relationship between the city and the countryside, but this debate has become more pressing nowadays with the spread of megacities, typically with a population of more than 10 million people. With more and more people living in urban areas, it is imperative to think of solutions for food production within cities, thereby making cities more independent from rural areas, which have historically been responsible for the supply of food to the entire planet.

The idea that cities will become self-sufficient in food production in the near future is both unrealistic and naive. Nevertheless, small initiatives such as urban gardens, either at home or public gardens run by the community, might be a good starting point for a much bigger change in the future. Or perhaps they simply represent a desire to return to one's roots and achieve a slightly slower lifestyle.

Courtesy of TAA DESIGNPhoto © M. Ifran NurdinPhoto © Ivo Tavares StudioPhoto © Philippe Ruault+ 17

Architecturally Integrated Bunk Beds: Material and Design Tips

It is a common misconception that bunk beds - which are sleeping spaces elevated above floor-level - are used exclusively for the bedrooms of children and teens. While bunk beds are a great solution for younger kids and older kids alike, the practical aspect of bunk beds which gives ample sleeping space while saving on floor space, makes them great for a variety of purposes and applications. With a rise in density and the majority of people living in large urban centers making use of increasingly smaller living spaces, there has come a push towards modularity in interior architecture. For this reason, bunk beds and lofted sleeping areas have become a great solution to maximize square footage. 

A Pioneering Exhibition Will Showcase Contemporary Indigenous Architecture

In this week's reprint from Metropolis magazine, authors Theodore (Ted) Jojola and Lynn Paxson talk about embracing “place knowing” as a process to understand building and planning, and highlight modern achievements in Pueblo architecture.

The Pueblo people of the Southwest have been stewards of their lands for millennia. In contrast to the colonial and territorial experiences of many tribal nations, the Pueblos avoided being displaced from their homelands. This prevented many of their places from being erased. As such, their ancient worldviews still remain at the core of their planning and design. Nothing is so important as their imprint on the expression of architecture, especially its form and function.

Furniture that Endures: Learning from Iconic Shelving Designed by Nisse and Kajsa Strinning

 | Sponsored Content

When it comes to creating timeless furniture, there's a lot to learn from modern classics like the String furniture system.

A' Design Awards & Competition: Call for Submissions

 | Sponsored Content

The A’ Design Award was "born out of the desire to underline the best designs and well-designed products." The A' Design Award, recognizing the excellent and original talent from across the globe, is both a major achievement for designers and a source of inspiration for award-winning architects, brands, and design agencies. Entry and nomination are open to contestants from every country. Registration for the A' Design Award & Competition 2021-2022 period is now open. Register and upload your design here, and receive a complimentary preliminary score.

Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter Reveals Climate Research and Visitor Center in Greenland

Nestled in the Arctic landscape of Greenland's UNESCO-protected wilderness, Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter has completed the Ilulissat Icefjord Centre, a research and visitor center that highlights the effects of climate change. The structure blends into the surrounding landscape, offering visitors a unique panorama of the Icefjord, while observing the detrimental consequences that climate change has on the environment.

Courtesy of Dorte Mandrup ArkitekterCourtesy of Dorte Mandrup ArkitekterCourtesy of Dorte Mandrup ArkitekterCourtesy of Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter+ 6

KCAP Reveals Updated Designs for Mixed-Use Development in Seoul

KCAP revealed an updated design for the Sewoon Grounds project in Seoul, a redevelopment plan to transform the district into a sustainable mixed-use area. The winning design of an international competition in 2017, intended to regenerate the 'Sewoon District 4' area of the city, the project aims to enhance the urban fabric while also integrating the existing built heritage and urban industry. KCAP's proposal generates a multi-layered scheme that builds on the successive layers of architecture and culture accumulated in time.

Courtesy of KCAPCourtesy of KCAPCourtesy of KCAPCourtesy of KCAP+ 8

Digital Tourism: Four Ways of Visiting Cities Without Leaving Your Home

The Covid-19 pandemic has been going on for over a year now, so people have consequently been traveling less, and tourism has slowed down all over the world. But that doesn't mean we still can't get to visit faraway places. Since the beginning of the lockdown, several museums and organizations have been preparing virtual tours that allow users to explore their spaces through digital immersion. With that in mind, here are four different ways for you to explore places without leaving your home.

Are Our Cities Built for the Youth?

Cities we live in today have been built on principles designed decades ago, with prospects of ensuring that they are habitable by everyone. Throughout history, cities have been catalysts of economic growth, serving as focal points for businesses and migration. However, in the last decade, particularly during the last couple of years, the world has  witnessed drastic reconfigurations in the way societies work, live, and commute.

Today’s urban fabric highlights two demographic patterns: rapid urbanization and large youth populations. Cities, although growing in scale, have in fact become younger, with nearly four billion of the world’s population under the age of 30 living in urban areas, and by 2030, UN-Habitat expects 60% of urban populations to be under the age of 18. So when it comes to urban planning and the future of cities, it is evident that the youth should be part of the conversation.

Courtesy of UN-Habitat, Global Public Space ProgrammeCourtesy of UN-Habitat, Global Public Space ProgrammeCourtesy of UN-Habitat, Global Public Space ProgrammeCourtesy of UN Habitat+ 14

The Impossibility of Equity

“Equity” is a moving target. We who create architecture want our devotion to have a true forum of objective Equity. But motivations are not outcomes. How we judge design inevitably carries the baggage of “Style” and that makes universal equity in design apprehension impossible.

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.