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Oslo: The Latest Architecture and News

Writers' Cottage 2 / JVA

© Jonas Adolfsen © Jonas Adolfsen © Jonas Adolfsen © Jonas Adolfsen + 17

  • Architects: JVA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  15
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2014

Munch Brygge Residential Complex / Lund+Slaatto Architects

© Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio + 32

Oslo, Norway

Skogbrynet Houses / R21 Arkitekter

© Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman + 11

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: R21 Arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  640
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Tennisveien Villa Apartments / R21 Arkitekter

© Åke E:son Lindman
© Åke E:son Lindman

© Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman + 20

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: R21 Arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1640
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019

Munthes Gate 29 House / R21 Arkitekter

© Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman + 21

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: R21 Arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1400
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019

Risalleen House / R21 Arkitekter

© Åke Eson Lindman
© Åke Eson Lindman

© Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman © Åke Eson Lindman + 13

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: R21 Arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  240
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Bygdøynesveien 15 Residential Complex / Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

© Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio © Mariela Apollonio + 22

Oslo, Norway

The Wedge Office Building / A-Lab

© Ivan Brodey
© Ivan Brodey

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey + 36

  • Architects: A-Lab
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  5000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016

Snøhetta Creates Peace Bench Sculpture for the UN Headquarters

Commissioned by the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway, and designed by Snøhetta, the installation entitled The Best Weapon, was first unveiled to the public at the United Nations Headquarters’ Plaza in New York City. This urban peace bench aims to honor “the past Nobel Peace Prize laureates and their efforts to bring people together to find effective solutions for peace”.

© Bjørnar Øvrebø © Bjørnar Øvrebø © Bjørnar Øvrebø © Bjørnar Øvrebø + 9

The 7th Edition of the Oslo Architecture Triennale Kicks Off

Already in its 7th edition, the Oslo Architecture Triennale opened this week, exploring “the architecture of a radically transformed society in which cultural and ecological flourishing matter more than economic growth”. Under the title of Enough: The Architecture of Degrowth, the festival is questioning the damage caused to the environment by the constant economic growth.

Trosterudveien 9 House / R21 Arkitekter

© Herman Dreyer © Herman Dreyer © Herman Dreyer © Herman Dreyer + 18

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: R21 Arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  300
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Lillesteile House / SKAARA Arkitekter AS

© Ivan Brodey
© Ivan Brodey

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Erlend Sørlie + 21

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: SKAARA Arkitekter AS
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  153
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Villa Stjerneveien / Lie Øyen arkitekter

© Richard Riesenfeld and Lie Øyen arkitekter © Richard Riesenfeld and Lie Øyen arkitekter © Richard Riesenfeld and Lie Øyen arkitekter © Richard Riesenfeld and Lie Øyen arkitekter + 15

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: Lie Oyen arkitekter
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  360
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2006

Degrowth: the Radical (Re)Action Needed to Avoid Total Economic and Environmental Collapse

ArchDaily is happy to announce our Media Partnership with @Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019! Throughout 2019 we will be sharing stories, interviews, and content related to the Triennale, which this year revolves around the theme of Degrowth. The interview below introduces Degrowth in the context of practice today - and hints at how this radical idea could irreversibly change how we value architectural production.

The world faces some significant challenges. The UN climate change report, which explained that we may have just 12 years and need “unprecedented changes” to avoid devastating effects from climate change, was released into a world that seemed to be plenty busy processing other things, such as rising economic inequality, increasingly partisan politics, escalating conflicts, and refugee crises, to name a few.

Scandinavian Spaceship / Kvistad Design Studio

© Lasse Fløde © Lasse Fløde © Lasse Fløde © Lasse Fløde + 33

OAT 2019 Open call: The Architecture of Degrowth

The engine of contemporary architectural production, and the basis of societies around the world, is economic growth. Global political orthodoxy declares GDP growth is always good; that more is more. Throughout the last two centuries increased economic growth brought with it many measures of prosperity, but for many decades now the limits to growth have been visible on the horizon. Social equity, health and wellbeing, quality of life, happiness and other non-monetary measures of success are faltering while resource extraction, greenhouse gas emissions, waste and toxicity, temperatures, sea levels, extreme weather, and many such indicators of climate breakdown make clear daily that the time of this worldview is running out.

Sentralen Library / Atelier Oslo + KIMA Arkitektur

© Lars Petter Pettersen © Lars Petter Pettersen © Lars Petter Pettersen © Lars Petter Pettersen + 44

Snøhetta's "A House to Die In" Blocked by Oslo Councilors

Oslo councilors have voted to halt the Snøhetta-designed “A House to Die In,” located in the grounds of painter Edward Munch’s former house and workshop in western Oslo. The recent vote, reported by Norwegian newspaper The Local would appear to put an end to the 8-year collaborative process between Snøhetta and Norwegian artist Bjarne Melgaard.

A House to Die In has become the most controversial building proposal in recent Norwegian history, due to its architectural form and how it honors the legacy of one of Norway’s most famous artists.