ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Skopje 2014 is a Controversial Project Aimed at Remodeling the European City

14:00 - 1 January, 2017
Skopje 2014 is a Controversial Project Aimed at Remodeling the European City, Courtesy of © Wikimedia user Pudelek licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
Courtesy of © Wikimedia user Pudelek licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

After the earthquake in Skopje in 1963, a slew of foreign architects worked to change the capital into an architecturally dynamic urban landscape. Now, that vision may be obsolete.  In Architects of Modernist Skopje Decry Retrograde Remodel, Bojan Blazhevski investigates the overwhelming number of buildings enduring "Skopje 2014" — a remodeling of existing buildings in the capital city. More than 20 modernist buildings have already been made over. Described as "kitsch" by a hostel manager in the city, the project, which aims to draw in more tourists and regain historical elements, has culminated in a neo-classical display. The imitation buildings, however, have produced controversy, with opinions divided on the aesthetic quality of the project. 

Interview with Neil Durbach: “You Don't Want to do the Same Thing Again; You Want to do Better!"

09:30 - 14 December, 2016
Interview with Neil Durbach: “You Don't Want to do the Same Thing Again; You Want to do Better!", Holman House (2004). Image © Peter Bennetts
Holman House (2004). Image © Peter Bennetts

Alongside Camilla Block and David Jaggers, Neil Durbach of Durbach Block Jaggers has carved out a unique place in Australian architecture. Known primarily for their carefully sculpted modernist houses, the firm's architecture is simultaneously rich in architectural references and thoroughly original. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky's “City of Ideas” series, Durbach explains the true inspirations behind their work, why these inspirations have little to do with the public descriptions of their projects, and why for him, the intention of all of his architecture “is to win Corb’s approval.”

Vladimir Belogolovsky: You came to Australia while the Sydney Opera House was still under construction. Does this mean you were here even before going to the US?

Neil Durbach: Yes, I first came to Australia as an exchange student while still in high school.

VB: So you have seen the Opera under construction then. How special was that? Did that building change anything in particular in you?

ND: Well, at that time I wanted to be an artist. A friend took me on a boat to see it. It was kind of staggering... And I thought – you know, this is much more interesting than art. And I felt – maybe architecture is what I should pursue.

Commonwealth Place (2002). Image © John Gollings North Bondi Surf Life Saving Club (2013). Image © John Gollings Roslyn Street (2009). Image © Anthony Browell UTS Thomas St Building (2014). Image © Anthony Browell +42

AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux

04:00 - 11 December, 2016
AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux, Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0

With the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s, the great World’s Fairs that had been held around the globe since the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 lost much of their momentum. With the specter of another global conflict looming like a stormcloud on the horizon in the latter half of the decade, prospects for the future only grew darker. It was in this air of uncertainty and fear that the gleaming white Trylon and Perisphere of the 1939 New York World’s Fair made their debuts, the centerpiece of an exhibition that presented a vision of hope for things to come.

Image via MetMuseum.org (Public Domain) A quarter section of the Perisphere reveals its steel skeletal structure. ImageImage via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) Image via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) The Helicline connected the Trylon and Perisphere and allowed visitors to make their way back to the ground from six stories up +8

AD Classics: Space Needle / John Graham & Company

04:00 - 7 December, 2016
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Rattlhed (Public Domain)
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Rattlhed (Public Domain)

The opening of the Century 21 Exposition on April 21, 1962 transformed the image of Seattle and the American Northwest in the eyes of the world. The region, which had been known until that point more for its natural resources than as a cultural capital, established a new reputation as a center of emergent technologies and aerospace design. This new identity was embodied by the centerpiece of the exposition: the Space Needle, a slender assemblage of steel and reinforced concrete which became—and remains—Seattle’s most iconic landmark.[1]

The Space Needle under construction before its opening in April 1962. ImageCourtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user Cacophony (Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) A 1962 cutaway drawing of the Space Needle's tophouse. ImageCourtesy of Flickr user James Vaughan (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) This sketched rendering of the Space Needle dates to April 1961 – one year before its opening. ImageCourtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives (Public Domain) +7

New Map Celebrates Berlin's Modernist Architecture

06:00 - 23 November, 2016
New Map Celebrates Berlin's Modernist Architecture , Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media
Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media

Blue Crow Media in collaboration with editor Matthew Tempest has produced another alluring map — this time for modernists. The city of choice? Berlin. With its abundance of 20th-century architecture, the Modern Berlin Map highlights the details of fifty prominent buildings.

Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media Courtesy of Blue Crowe Media +11

Rehabilitation of Netherlands Complex Wins World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize 2016

06:00 - 9 November, 2016
Rehabilitation of Netherlands Complex Wins World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize 2016, © Molenaar & Co. architecten/Bas Kooij
© Molenaar & Co. architecten/Bas Kooij

Molenaar & Co architecten (Rotterdam), Hebly Theunissen architecten (Delft), and landscape architect Michael van Gessel (Amsterdam) have won the 2016 World Monuments Fund/ Knoll Modernism Prize for the preservation and rehabilitation of the Justus van Effen complex in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Originally designed by Michiel Brinkman in 1919-1921 and completed in 1922, the Justus van Effen complex is a strong example of the ideals embodied in the modern movement, particularly with its use of an elevated “street” as a means of facilitating social cohesion, which became very influential for subsequent generations of designers. 

© Healy Theunissen architecten © Molenaar & Co. architecten/Bas Kooij © Molenaar & Co. architecten/Bas Kooij © Molenaar & Co. architecten/Bas Kooij +13

Spotlight: Le Corbusier

06:00 - 6 October, 2016
Spotlight: Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/2089042156'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Oskar Hansen: Open Form Exhibition at Yale School of Architecture

12:07 - 27 September, 2016
Oskar Hansen: Open Form Exhibition at Yale School of Architecture, Oskar Hansen Open Form at Yale School of Architecture © Rich House Photography
Oskar Hansen Open Form at Yale School of Architecture © Rich House Photography

An exhibition highlighting the work of Oskar Hansen (1922-2005), architect, urban planner, and theorist, has opened at the Yale School of Architecture (YSoA) running from 1 September to 17 December 2016.

Oskar Hansen: Open Form traces the evolution of Hansen’s theory of Open Form from its origin in his own architectural projects to its application in film, visual games, and other artistic practices. The exhibition will be on view at YSoA through 17 December in Paul Rudolph Hall, 180 York St. It is free and open to the public Monday-Friday 9.00- 5.00, and Saturday 10.00-5.00.

Modern Regionalism: The Architecture of Sarbjit Bahga

03:30 - 27 September, 2016
Modern Regionalism: The Architecture of Sarbjit Bahga, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Modern Regionalism: The architecture of Sarbjit Bahga is a monograph on the selected works of Indian architect Sarbjit Bahga. He has more than three-and-a-half decades of practical experience in designing of various types of buildings, complexes and large campuses. His completed works include an eclectic and impressive range of administrative, recreational, educational, medical, residential, commercial and agricultural buildings. His building designs are innovative and responsive to function, climate and materials. He is a staunch modernist and an ardent, yet not blind, admirer of Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Louis Kahn.

Photographer Raphael Olivier Explores the Suspended Reality of North Korea’s Socialist Architecture

09:30 - 8 September, 2016
Photographer Raphael Olivier Explores the Suspended Reality of North Korea’s Socialist Architecture, Ryugyong Hotel. Image © Raphael Olivier
Ryugyong Hotel. Image © Raphael Olivier

North Korea is one of the few countries still under communist rule, and probably the most isolated and unknown worldwide. This is a result of the philosophy of Juche – a political system based on national self-reliance which was partly influenced by principles of Marxism and Leninism.

In recent years though, the country has loosened its restrictions on tourism, allowing access to a limited number of visitors. With his personal photo series “North Korea – Vintage Socialist Architecture,” French photographer Raphael Olivier reports on Pyongyang’s largely unseen architectural heritage. ArchDaily interviewed Olivier about the project, the architecture he captured, and what he understood of North Korea’s architecture and way of life.

The Workers Party Foundation Monument . Image © Raphael Olivier Pyongyang International Cinema House. Image © Raphael Olivier Pyongyang Ice Rink . Image © Raphael Olivier Overpass. Image © Raphael Olivier +21

A New Website That Catalogs the Mid-Century Modernist Heritage of Fire Island Pines

12:30 - 27 August, 2016
At 601 Tuna Walk is <a href='http://www.archdaily.com/638862/a-frame-rethink-bromley-caldari-architects'>Bromley Caldari Architects' 2013 Renovation</a> of a 1960s A-frame structure by an unknown architect. Image © Mikiko Kikuyama
At 601 Tuna Walk is Bromley Caldari Architects' 2013 Renovation of a 1960s A-frame structure by an unknown architect. Image © Mikiko Kikuyama

At just 1,310 feet (400 meters) across at its widest point, Fire Island, a barrier island to the south of Long Island in New York, may not seem like an ideal place to host a community. Nonetheless, the island is home to a number of small villages, whose seclusion and proximity to the ocean make them popular getaway locations. With its beach atmosphere (the community is only accessible by ferry) and its growing reputation from the 1960s onward as a safe space for the gay community, Fire Island Pines is one such popular summer destination. As the village grew in the post-war years, the care-free recreational lifestyle encouraged by Fire Island Pines' setting was an ideal proving ground for many of the ideals of mid-century modernist house design, with architects such as the prolific Horace Gifford—who designed 40 homes in Fire Island Pines alone—answering the call.

AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes

04:00 - 19 August, 2016
AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum
The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

The end of the First World War did not mark the end of struggle in Europe. France, as the primary location of the conflict’s Western Front, suffered heavy losses in both manpower and industrial productivity; the resulting economic instability would plague the country well into the 1920s.[1] It was in the midst of these uncertain times that the French would signal their intention to look not to their recent troubled past, but to a brighter and more optimistic future. This signal came in the form of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Decorative Arts and Modern Industries) of 1925 – a landmark exhibition which both gave rise to a new international style and, ultimately, provided its name: Art Deco.

Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Horta’s Belgian Pavilion was a radical departure from his typically curvilinear Art Nouveau style. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) +14

AD Classics: Proposal for a Hospital in Venice / Le Corbusier

04:30 - 15 August, 2016
AD Classics: Proposal for a Hospital in Venice / Le Corbusier, Model. Image © Fondation Le Corbusier (FLC/ADAGP)
Model. Image © Fondation Le Corbusier (FLC/ADAGP)

Le Corbusier made an indelible mark on Modernist architecture when he declared “une maison est une machine-à-habiter” (“a house is a machine for living”). His belief that architecture should be as efficient as machinery resulted in such proposals such as the Plan Voisin, a proposal to transform the Second Empire boulevards of Paris into a series of cruciform skyscrapers rising from a grid of freeways and open parks.[1] Not all of Le Corbusier’s concepts, however, were geared toward such radical urban transformation. His 1965 proposal for a hospital in Venice, Italy, was notable in its attempt at seeking aesthetic harmony with its unique surroundings: an attempt not to eradicate history, but to translate it.

Model. Image © Fondation Le Corbusier (FLC/ADAGP) Plan Plan Situation Plan +7

All The Architecture To See in Rio de Janeiro During the 2016 Olympics

09:30 - 5 August, 2016
All The Architecture To See in Rio de Janeiro During the 2016 Olympics, Image created using original image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/over_kind_man/3184875811/'>Flickr user over_kind_man</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Image created using original image © Flickr user over_kind_man licensed under CC BY 2.0

Rio de Janeiro is a city of sights and sounds. As diverse as its people is the collection of impressive architecture found in Brazil’s second most populous city—from Eurocentric historical architecture to 20th century regionalist modern marvels, not to mention the city’s growing crop of contemporary cultural venues. The combination of mountainous terrain, lush rainforest, and the ocean inspires many to create lively and unique architecture.

In preparation for the 2016 Summer Olympics, the city has enlisted a crop of internationally renowned architects including Santiago Calatrava, whose work joins Rio's existing masterpieces from architects such as Oscar Niemeyer. But apart from its "Capital A" Architecture, the city of Rio is home to thousands of residents living in the now-famous favelas—interesting subjects of inquiry for those interested in the concept of spontaneous urban growth. There’s a building for just about every architecture fan visiting Rio this year or anytime in the future.

Santa Marta. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/armandolobos/5920954662/'>Flickr user alobos Life</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a> Cidade das Artes. Image © Nelson Kon Metropolitan Cathedral of Saint Sebastian. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincentraal/9136698555/in/photolist-eVo64M-eVo3gR-eVnYar'>Flickr user vincentraal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Museum of Tomorrow. Image © Bernard Lessa Rio Municipal Theater. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13084341645/in/photolist-kWfhuy-kWdM16-kWdEVk-kWfo5b'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a> Niterói Contemporary Art Museum. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13034234305'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a> Maracanã Stadium. Image © Schlaich Bergermann und partner Parque Lage. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/93906643@N08/8552874061/in/dateposted/'>Flickr user Jonas Santin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Museu de Arte Moderna. ImageImage © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MAM_-_Museu_de_Arte_Moderna_do_Rio_de_Janeiro_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Halley Pacheco de Oliveira</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> +20

Roberto Burle Marx: A Master of Much More than Just Modernist Landscape

10:20 - 3 August, 2016
Roberto Burle Marx: A Master of Much More than Just Modernist Landscape, © Cesar Barreto (left); Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved (right)
© Cesar Barreto (left); Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved (right)

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Green Thumb."

At any given moment when walking through Roberto Burle Marx: Brazilian Modernist at the Jewish Museum in New York, one may hear a soft rushing of waves, mixed with the murmur of an open-air crowd. A narration in Portuguese, both spoken and sung, will drift breezily in and out. This is the soundscape of Plages, a 2001 video by artist Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster. Shot from an aerial perspective above Copacabana Beach, the film shows the popular Rio de Janeiro waterfront not in its usual sunlit splendor but in the artificially lit nocturne of New Year’s Eve 2000. Celebrators teem in the space between city and ocean, in the moment between one year and the next, moving in dynamic patterns amid the immense designs laid out by Roberto Burle Marx.

Burle Marx’s design for a rooftop garden at the Ministry of Education and Health (1938). Image © Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved An untitled work in collage, made in 1967, illustrates Burle Marx’s diverse artistic pursuits. Image Courtesy of Sítio Roberto Burle Marx, Rio de Janeiro A cover design for a 1953 issue of Rio magazine. Burle Marx experimented with new forms in different formats, including works of sculpture, which he often integrated into his landscape designs. Image Courtesy of Sítio Roberto Burle Marx, Rio de Janeiro A model of a sculptural landmark for the unrealized Praça Sérgio Pacheco, City Hall, Uberlândia project (1974). Image © Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved +11

AD Classics: Café l'Aubette / Theo van Doesburg

04:00 - 20 July, 2016
AD Classics: Café l'Aubette / Theo van Doesburg, Courtesy of Wikimedia user Claude Truong-Ngoc
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Claude Truong-Ngoc

Concealed behind an 18th century Baroque façade in Strasbourg’s Place Kléber, the Café L’Aubette is a dazzlingly incongruous expression of the 1920s De Stijl movement. Designed by Theo van Doesburg, one of the movement’s founders and leading lights, the Aubette’s minimalist, geometric aesthetic was heavily influenced by the work of contemporary artists such as Piet Mondrian. In designing the café’s interiors, Van Doesburg sought to do more than simply place viewers before a painting; he wanted to envelop them in it.

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

03:00 - 13 June, 2016
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock +26

AD Classics: Palazzo dei Congressi / Louis Kahn

14:00 - 11 June, 2016
AD Classics: Palazzo dei Congressi / Louis Kahn, Model of the unrealised Palazzo dei Congressi, Venice. Image © Unidentified Source
Model of the unrealised Palazzo dei Congressi, Venice. Image © Unidentified Source

The city of Venice has been caught in a tug of war between progress and traditionalism for many years, and particularly since the construction of a railroad viaduct in 1846 linked the island city to the Italian mainland for the first time in its history.[1] Over a century later, the Venetian government commissioned Louis Kahn to design a new Palazzo dei Congressi for the city; his proposal, while paying respect to the histories of both the Republic of Venice and a unified Italy, could not escape similar controversy.

Model. Image © Unidentified Source This rough site plan for the building (1968-1974) is currently on the FBI's National Stolen Art File. Image via FBI Concept sketches. Image © Unidentified Source Plan of the Congress Hall +8