Win a FREE Full Pass to the 2015 AIA National Convention from reThink Wood

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In just over a month, the AIA National Convention is coming to Atlanta to celebrate world class innovations in architecture, new materials and technology. If you haven’t booked your ticket already, here is a chance to attend one of the largest architecture events, free of charge!

reThink Wood is offering a full pre-paid pass to the National Convention ($1,025 value) to one lucky ArchDaily reader. The winner will also be able to meet with architects on site that are passionate about innovative design with in mid-rise, and even high-rise structures.

To win, just answer the following question in the comments section before April 20 at 12:00PM ESTWhat is your favorite example of wood in architecture?

More on reThink Wood at the AIA National Convention after the break.

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Amanda Levete to Design Melbourne’s Second Annual MPavilion

Temporary structure from the "Move: Choreographing You" exhibition by Amanda Levete. Image © Gidon Fuehrer

British architect Amanda Levete of London-based studio AL_A has been selected to design Melbourne’s second annual MPavilion. The temporary structure will be used to house talks, workshops, performances and installations in the ”downtown oasis” of Queen Victoria Gardens starting this October. 

“I’ve visited Australia three times in the past six years and without doubt Melbourne is my favorite city,” said Levete, commenting on her commission. “It’s people that make a city creative – and that’s why I love Melbourne. The brief from the Naomi Milgrom Foundation is a great opportunity to design a structure that responds to its climate and landscape. I’m interested in exploiting the temporary nature of the pavilion form to produce a design that speaks in response to the weather.”

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Spotlight: Richard Neutra

© Klaus Meier-Ude via architonic.com

Though Modernism is sometimes criticized for imposing universal rules on different people and areas, but it was Richard J. Neutra‘s (April 8, 1892 – April 16, 1970) intense client focus that won him acclaim. His personalized and flexible version of modernism created a series of private homes that were and are highly sought after, and make him one of the ’ most significant mid century modernists. His architecture of simple geometry and airy steel and glass became the subject of the iconic photographs of Julius Schulman, and came to stand for an entire era of American design.

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Mexican Company Develops Wood Substitute from a Tequila Byproduct

A sample of the material. Image © Plastinova via phys.org

Searching for an alternative to costly and resource intensive , Mexican company Plastinova has developed a wood substitute from a byproduct of tequila and recycled which it claims is not only renewable, but also stronger than the materials that it hopes to replace.

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BIG-led Webinar to Discuss the Manhattan “Dry Line”

Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org

One of the six winners of the Rebuild by Design competition, Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) “Dry Line” project aims to protect from future storms like Hurricane Sandy by creating a protective barrier around lower . The barrier will be formed by transforming underused waterfront areas into public parks and amenities. Now, you can learn more about the vision behind the project and how it was developed in a webinar led by Jeremy Alain Siegel, the director of the BIG Rebuild by Design team and head of the subsequent East Side Coastal Resiliency Project. The webinar will take place on Friday, June 12. Learn more and sign-up on Perform.Network

The Architecture Of Death

At the 2014 Venice Biennale, away from the concentrated activity of the Arsenale and Giardini, was Death in Venice: one of the few independent projects to take root that year. The exhibition was curated by Alison Killing and Ania Molenda, who worked alongside LUST graphic designers. It saw the hospitals, cemeteries, crematoria and hospices of London interactively mapped creating, as Gian Luca Amadei put it, an overview of the capital’s “micro-networks of death.” Yet it also revealed a larger message: that architecture related to death and dying appears to no longer be important to the development of architecture as a discipline.

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David Chipperfield Disowns Milan’s Museum of Culture Over “Floor War”

© Oskar Da Riz Fotografie via MUDEC

The poor quality and laying of stone flooring in Milan‘s newly completed Museum of Culture has led its architect, David Chipperfield to dissociate himself with the building. Blasting officials for skimping on materials, the British architect is demanding his name be removed from the project, claiming the building is now a “museum of horrors” and a “pathetic end to 15 years of work” due to the low quality flooring. 

On the contrary, ’s council says the material decision was made in the “interests of the taxpayers,” further claiming that, according to councillor Filippo del Corno, Chipperfield has been “unreasonable and impossible to please.” 

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Mark Zuckerberg Praises Frank Gehry: “He’s Very Efficient”

Early building model inside the completed headquarters. Image Image via Mark Zuckerberg

After Facebook began its move into its new Frank Gehry-designed headquarters last week, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has praised his architect for his work. In a post on his personal Facebook page yesterday, Zuckerberg shares the story of how Gehry he initially turned down Gehry’s request to design the project, saying that “even though we all loved his architecture… We figured he would be very expensive and that would send the wrong signal about our culture.”

But Frank Gehry persisted, saying that he would match any bids the company received. As a result, Zuckerberg has now praised Gehry – in a somewhat uncharacteristic description of the architect – for being “very efficient.”

Read Zuckerberg’s full statement, after the break.

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‘Dimensionless’ Photographic Façade Studies By Nikola Olic

Twisted Building (Frank Gehry). Image ©

Nikola Olic is an architectural photographer based in Dallas, Texas, with a focus on capturing and reimagining buildings and sculptural objects in “dimensionless and disorienting ways.” His photographs, which often isolate views of building façades, frame architectural surfaces in order for them to appear to collapse into two dimensions. According to Olic, “this transience can be suspended by a camera shutter for a fraction of a second.” As part of his process, each photograph is named before being given a short textual accompaniment.

See a selection of Olic’s photographs after the break.

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New Images Released of SHoP Architects’ 111 West 57th Street

© Property Markets Group via YIMBY

Uncovered by New York YIMBY, five new images have been revealed showing SHoP Architects‘ supertall and super-slender tower at 111 West 57th Street in Manhattan, just south of Central Park on what has become known as “Billionaire’s Row” (on account of the slew of new residential skyscrapers with some unit prices approaching $100 million).

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David Chipperfield’s First Residential Project in New York to be Built at Bryant Park

David Chipperfield. Image Courtesy of

Manhattan based real-estate company HFZ Capital Group has announced “The Bryant,” David Chipperfield Architects‘ first residential condominium project in New York City, located at 16 West 40th Street. The proposal for the 32-story building features a hotel on the lower levels, with 57 apartments ranging from one- to four-bedrooms, including two duplex penthouses, on floors 15 through 32 – offering residents “the rare opportunity to live in a new construction, residential development on the fully-restored Bryant Park,” according to the developers.

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These Maps Reveal Just How Disjointed Many US Bike Lanes Are

Boston’s bicycle infrastructure grid: includes bike lanes, protected lanes, shared roads, and off-road trails. Image Courtesy of Washington Post

As cities worldwide are plagued with increasingly congested streets, more people are turning to bicycles to ease their commute. To accommodate the trend, bike lanes have been popping up around cities, yet often in a disjointed manner. A series of maps compiled by the Washington Post illustrates this surprisingly sporadic cycle infrastructure in several US cities.

Cropping up as afterthoughts in the existing urban fabric, many US bicycle networks consist of fragmented stretches of bike lanes and “sharrows” (shared car and bike lanes) loosely bound together by their proximity. In the case of Washington D.C., most of these are under a mile in length. A lack of cohesion and continuity leads to commuter chaos, forcing cyclists onto unprotected shoulders or into traffic when their designated lanes pull a disappearing act. Take a look at the maps after the break.

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PITCHAfrica Creates Water-Harvesting Campus and Stadium for Communities In Need

Waterbank Stadium under construction, photo credit: A.Maganga. Image Courtesy of

In many African countries, clean water is still a luxury. Wars are fought over it, families are uprooted for it, and entire communities perish without it. The scarcity of freshwater has plagued nations in Africa and around the world for centuries. Now, non-profit group PITCHAfrica is fixing the problem with a novel combination of sport and design. Part of a 10-acre Waterbank Campus comprised of 7 water-harvesting buildings, the soccer (or “futsal”) stadium is capable of hosting up to 1500 people, helping to save, educate and unite communities that are most in need. 

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AIANY and the Center for Architecture Name David Burney as Interim Executive Director

David Burney. Image Image via Architect Magazine

After the unexpected departure of Rick Bell last week, the American Institute of Architects’ Chapter (AIANY) and the Center for Architecture have named David Burney as interim Executive Director until a long-term replacement can be found. Currently an Associate Professor of Planning and Placemaking at the Pratt Institute’s School of Architecture and Board Chair for the Center for Active Design, Burney worked as an architect at Davis Brody Bond until 1990, when he embarked on a 24-year career as one of New York‘s key civil servants: first as director of design at the NYC Housing Authority (NYCHA) until 2003, and then as Commissioner of the City’s Department of Design and Construction (DDC) from 2004 until 2014.

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Richard Rogers Donates His Parents’ Home To Harvard GSD

Richard Roger’s parents’ house in Wimbledon, London. Image © Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners LLP

Richard Rogers has announced that the home he built for his parents in Wimbledon, London, will be gifted to Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD) for the training of doctorates in the field of architecture. The home, which will be donated by his charity, the  Charitable Settlement, was completed between 1967 and 1968 by Richard and his then wife Su Rogers. Originally designed for his parents, Dr. William Nino and Dada Rogers, the Grade II* listed pre-fabrictated single storey dwelling was later adapted for Rogers’ son Ab and his family, before being put on the market in 2013 for £3.2million ($4.8million).

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Nasher Sculpture Center Announces New $100,000 Prize

interior designed by Renzo Piano. Image ©

The Nasher Sculpture Center has announced the new $100,000 Nasher Prize, an international prize that will be awarded annually to living artists worldwide for “work that has had an extraordinary impact on the understanding of sculpture.” The inaugural winner will be announced in Fall of 2015.

“The Nasher Sculpture Center is one of a few institutions worldwide dedicated exclusively to the exhibition and study of modern and contemporary sculpture,” says the center. “As such, the prize is an apt extension of the museum’s mission and its commitment to advancing developments in the field. By recognizing those artists who have influenced our understanding of sculpture and its possibilities, the Nasher Sculpture Center will further its role as a leading institution in enhancing and promoting this vital art form.”

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10 Stunning Images of Sacred Spaces

San Josemaría Escrivá Church / Javier Sordo Madaleno Bringas. Image © Fran Parente

In the spirit of Easter Sunday, we’ve rounded up a compilation of ten glorious sacred spaces from our Religious Architecture Pinterest board. Ranging from traditional, reverent congregation halls to unexpected ultra-modern chapels, these spectacular places of worship are bound to inspire. Get a dose of these divine works after the break…

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Norrmalm City District Sides with Nobel Foundation

© David Chipperfield Architects

With opposition seemingly mounting against the ’s plans to build a new, David Chipperfield-designed center along Stockholm’s Blasieholmen, advisors for ’s neighborhood management has spoke up in favor of the project believing to be an opportunity to enhance the urban fabric and make the area more family-friendly. “The administration believes that the new park should be as green as possible and that more play environments for children and youth a priority in the development of public spaces,” reads the statement, highlighting the open space provided in the plan. Their response is just one of many that will help sway Stockholm’s City Planning and City Council final decision later this year.

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