2015 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist

MoMA P.S.1 has announced five finalists to compete in the 2015 Young Architects Program (). Now in it’s 16th edition, the competition will challenge a group of emerging architects to design a temporary installation within the walls of the P.S.1 courtyard for MoMA’s annual summer “Warm-Up” series.

The 2015 shortlist includes Office for Political Innovation (Andres Jaque; NY), brillhart architecture (Jacob Brillhart; Miami, FL), Erin Besler (LA, CA), The Bittertang Farm (Michael Loverich; NY), Studio Benjamin Dillenburger (Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer; ONT, Canada). The winners will be announced in early 2015. 

Previous winners include The Living (Hy-Fi), CODA (Party Wall), Interboro Partners (Holding Pattern), Work AC (Public Farm 1), MOS (Afterparty) and SO-IL (Pole Dance).

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Juhani Pallasmaa and Diébédo Francis Kéré Honored in 2014 Schelling Architecture Awards

Centre for Earth Architecture / Kere Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan

The Schelling Architecture Foundation has announced Juhani Pallasmaa and Diébédo Francis Kéré as the recipients of its Architecture Theory and Architecture Prizes, respectively, for 2014. Awarded once every two years since 1994, the Schelling Prizes are prestigious awards that historically have been reasonable predictors of the Pritzker Prize, with Zaha Hadid, Peter Zumthor, Kazuyo Sejima and Wang Shu all receiving a some years before their Pritzker Prize.

This year, the Schelling Prize’s “indigenous ingenuity” theme was inspired by the 2012 Theory winner Kenneth Frampton‘s theory of Critical Regionalism, with the prize asking ”how can inventive and directly comprehensible architecture satisfy human needs in an appealing way?”

More on the winners after the break

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Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gains First Planning Approval

© Arup

Lambeth Council has awarded planning permission for the Garden Bridge, Thomas Heatherwick and Arup‘s planned crossing of the Thames which has been proposed and supported by actress Joanna Lumley. The approval is the first in a series that the bridge needs to become a reality, with Westminster City Council, London mayor Boris Johnson and Communities Secretary Eric Pickles all still needing to sign off on the project, according to the Architects’ Journal.

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BIG Tapped to Design Public Square for Battersea Power Station

Masterplan. Image Courtesy of

BIG is set to make its debut. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, the Danish practice has been selected from an international shortlist to design a public square for Battersea Power Station. Though no formal announcement has been made, the “Malaysia Square” scheme will be a key element in the Wilkinson Eyre-designed masterplan, serving as the development’s “front door.” It will connect the masterplan’s first three phases, just south of the listed landmark, which include Frank Gehry and Foster + Partners’ proposed “Electric Boulevard.”

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Karim Rashid Shifts Focus to Architecture

Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / . Image © Lee Gyeon Bae

Karim Rashid, internationally renowned for his work in industrial design, has recently shifted his focus towards real estate. Alongside his team of nine architects, the -based designer is currently working on 11 buildings worldwide, including four in . With extensive knowledge in product design and no formal architectural education, Rashid believes designing architecture isn’t out of his realm:

“I have to say, and I don’t mean this in a pejorative way, that architecture, in a sense the more pedestrian architecture, is generally quite simple compared to industrial design. In other words, it’s far more sophisticated to do something like a mobile phone than it is to do an average building.” Read the full interview, here.

Dorte Mandrup Designs Wadden Sea Center for Denmark’s Largest National Park

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The city of Esbjerg has selected Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter through a competition to extend and refurbish the Wadden Sea Center in Vester Vedsted. A UNESCO World Heritage area, the Wadden Sea is ’s largest National park. The new center aims to “create awareness and understanding for the marshland and the Wadden Sea,” as jury member and leader of the center Klaus Melbye explains. “The architecture is sustainable, visionary and bold and brings forth the Centre as an didactic information centre of the future.”

More about Dorte Mandrup’s winning design, after the break.

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Oak Ridge National Laboratory Develops 3D Printing Process at the Mircoscale

This electron backscatter diffraction image shows variations in crystallographic orientation in a nickel-based component, achieved by controlling the 3-D printing process at the microscale. Image Courtesy of ORNL

3D printing technology continues to advance, developing new applications which are particularly promising for the world of architecture. Now, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have demonstrated a new manufacturing process that can create 3D printed metal components with an unprecedented degree of precision. For architecture, this could mean greater control over the customization of the smallest components in buildings, as well as more carefully engineered properties of the larger ones.

The new technique involves an additive process in which successive layers of material are laid down with computer control and fused to create an object of almost any shape. As technology has progressed, printers have been able to progressively increase their resolution, enabling the creation of smaller parts with smoother surfaces. ORNL has developed a process that precisely manages the solidification of metal parts in each layer on a microscopic scale. This enables them to better control local material properties, which can have a profound impact on the strength, weight, and function of 3D printed metal components.

Read on to learn more about how this manufacturing process could shape the future of .

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100 Resilient Cities: How the Rockefeller Foundation is Addressing Resiliency on a Global Scale

OMA’s proposed Hoboken Waterfront for the “Rebuild by Design” competition, which focused on resilience, sustainability and livability. Image Courtesy of OMA

Resiliency has become a keyword when it comes to city planning and development, so much so that former AIA president, Clark Manus, declared last year that “resilience is the new Green.” To address on a global level and help cities around the world become more resilient to social, economic and physical challenges, The Rockefeller Foundation kicked off its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge in 2013. Under the initiative,100 cities will be selected to be part of the challenge, where they will receive help and funding to hire a Chief Resilience Officer and assistance in developing and implementing a resilience strategy.

So far 33 cities have been selected and last week the first-ever Chief Resilience Officer summit was held in New Orleans. To learn more about the summit in New Orleans, the overall initiative, and how cities can become more resilient, we spoke with President of 100 Resilient Cities, Michael Berkowitz, who said: “When you think about what makes a resilient city, you have to think in holistic terms. The reality is that resilience building is a multi-sector, multi-level kind of enterprise.”

Read the full interview with Berkowitz after the break

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Get to Grips with Guggenheim Helsinki’s Record-Breaking Competition with this Infographic Video

By now, when the design competition for the Guggenheim Helsinki is mentioned, one number probably comes to mind: 1,715, the record-breaking number of submissions which the competition received. But how can this number be put into perspective? Why, with more numbers of course. Take 5,769 for example, which is the total height in meters of all the A1 presentation boards arranged vertically. Or take 18,336,780, the estimated value in Euros of all the work submitted.

Check out this great video from Taller de Casquería, which gives a rundown of all of the mind-blowing statistics generated by the competition, and concludes with this strong message to the Guggenheim itself: “These are incredible figures that show the impact that the Guggenheim Foundation has throughout the world… Guggenheim should document this to recognize their success in helping to shape a global community, dedicated to visual culture.”

Can Good Architecture Be as Calming as Meditation?

Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute was among the “contemplative architecture” that the researchers used during the study. Image © Flickr CC User dreamsjung

If ever architects needed a little vindication in their work, this might just be it: a team of neuroscientists have found evidence that good architecture can positively affect the human brain. Testing a highly susceptible group of subjects (i.e. architects), the team demonstrated that so-called “contemplative architecture” can have similar effects to meditation – except with much less effort on the part of the person experiencing it. This article in the Atlantic discusses the team’s work at length, delving into the science behind the discovery, but also uncovering an interesting oddity in the world of architectural : it seems not much is being done because ”it’s difficult to suggest that people are dying from it.” In the case of the current study, the team “totally loaded the deck” by only selecting architects as their subjects, apparently not aiming to prove anything but simply to secure further funding. Read the full article here for more on the latest in architectural neuroscience.

Five Teams Shortlisted To Design Bristol Arena

Vision of the masterplan (commissioned in 2007). Image Courtesy of Temple Quarter

Five practices have been shortlisted to put forward designs for the Bristol Arena, a cultural and sporting hub which is set to have a 12,000 seating capacity and is due to open towards the end of 2017. The city’s Mayor, George Ferguson (who is himself an architect-turned-politician), has said that “we now have five very capable and talented design teams with a wealth of experience between them drawing up proposals” that will contribute to the regeneration of the city’s Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone (a site close to Temple Meads Station). The five shortlisted multi-disciplinary design teams are consortiums experienced in delivering major cultural venues in the UK or overseas. A team led by Populous, who completed the London 2012 Olympic Stadium, are running in collaboration with Feilden Clegg Bradley, who were shortlisted for the 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize. They are competing against teams led by Grimshaw and Wilkinson Eyre, who recently installed a cable-car across London’s Millennium Dome.

See details of the five teams after the break.

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Win a Scholarship for the AA Visiting School in Santiago

What does architecture have to do with Chilean astronomy? A lot more than many realize. In the 1960s, the manufactured three Grand Passage Instrument telescopes (GIPpy), and their accompanying domes in Saint Petersburg. Unfortunately, they fell into ruin after the Soviet astronomical mission’s departure from following the 1973 military coup d-etat. Now, however, the Architectural Association Visiting School in Santiago, Chile, in partnership with the Pontifical Catholic University, will host a 10-day workshop in January on the GIPpy telescopes. The workshop is organized by the team that was recently awarded the Silver Lion at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale for their work on Soviet prefabricated housing in Chile, and we’ve teamed up with the Architectural Association Visiting School to give away two £600 scholarships to attend the workshop!

For more information on the workshop and to find out how to enter to win a scholarship read on after the break…

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Step Into the Multicolored Universe of the Pantone Hotel with these Eye-Watering Images

© Sven Laurent

The , a seven-story hotel in Brussels with decor inspired by the famous Pantone color system, opened for business in 2010, but these candy-colored images of its multi-hued rooms were new to us. Designed by interior designer Michel Penneman and architect Olivier Hannaert, and photographed by Sven Laurent, the Hotel serves up 59 rooms in a wide variety of color schemes, perfected by ’s authoritative color matching system. It is the apotheosis of the company’s transition into manufacturing lifestyle products, with the “Pantone Universe” range containing everything from mugs to cufflinks, all colored to an exact specification with their identifying code.

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PKMN Architectures Creates Sliding Transformer House in Madrid

Courtesy of

“All I Own House is a project that materializes the interior of a house through its inhabitant’s personal belongings,” say PKMN Architectures about their All I Own House, a small customizable home and studio for client Yolanda Pila of ERREPILA Design Studio. Built in a small neighborhood in northern Madrid, the single-storey house belonged to the client’s grandmother. Now, it serves all the functions required of Yolanda’s dynamic living and working style.

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Nadau Lavergne Architects Present Proposal to Revitalize Detroit’s Decaying Packard Plant

Courtesy of

Nadau Lavergne Architects, the winning team of the Reanimate the Ruins international ideas contest, have shared with us their proposal to revive Detroit‘s historic Packard Automotive Plant, the former factory which has become an icon of the city’s post-industrial decline. By developing a proposal which frees the land from unwanted structures and knits the colossal 1 kilometer-long building back into the urban landscape, Nadau Lavergne Architects have created a design which returns both a sense of community and some economic hope back to the building.

Read more about the proposal after the break

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Video: Why Should Architects be Concerned About Mobility?

With the rising success of electric and the highly anticipated introduction of self-driving , it is beginning to look like the ‘end of the automobile age’ which many predicted just a few years ago may never come. This was the sentiment presented by Audi CEO Rupert Stadler at the presentation of the Audi Urban Future Award last night: “The car has to be seen once again as a desirable object of progress,” he demanded. “To achieve this, we have to tear down the walls between infrastructure, public and individual traffic.” Audi’s New Urban Agenda therefore sets its sights on “solutions in which individual transportation makes a positive contribution in an overall system of different forms of mobility.”

The award, which saw Team Mexico City win with their proposal to crowd source up-to-the-minute traffic data which informs traffic planning decisions, highlights the relationship between cars, urban planning and ultimately architecture. “We have left mobility to the transportation experts for too many decades,” says Jose Castillo, a Harvard Professor and leader of Team Mexico City. “Nowadays thinking about urban space and infrastructure, this is something that architects have a lot to say about.”

Check out our video from the event above, where we asked participants from each of the four teams to outline in their view “why should architects be concerned about mobility?”

ARCHILIFE: Hollywood Stars Chill Out in Modernist Masterpieces

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Federico Babina is back, this time bringing some cinematic life to the world’s most well known modernist interiors with ARCHILIFE. ”I have never liked the lack of life in the architectural representations that are often aseptic, clean and neutral,” explains Babina. “I often enjoy imagining what life would be like in these static images.”

The images show history’s most famous film stars living out their daily routines in some of our favorite homes, bringing “the banality of everyday life” to these myths of both Architecture and Cinema. “We are used to perceiving and reading architecture as a set of almost metaphysical spaces. In a similar way we see the actors as characters and not as people,” he says. “I wanted to try to reverse these patterns: to transform the interior into ‘houses’ and the actors into ‘people’.”

From Marilyn and Mies to Caine and Kahn, the stars get a home to match their temperament, in which to relax, watch TV, meditate – and yes, to clean and tidy too.

See the full set of 17 ARCHILIFE images after the break – and just in case you missed them, check out Federico Babina‘s other popular illustration sets: ARCHIWINDOWARTISTECTARCHISET, ARCHIMACHINE, ARCHIPORTRAITARCHISTARCHIBET and ARCHICINE.

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Renzo Piano Gains Planning Permission for Shard-Adjacent Residential Tower

View from Guy’s Hospital Quad. Image © RPBW

Renzo Piano Building Workshop has been awarded planning approval for Feilden House, a 26-storey residential building at London Bridge Quarter, directly adjacent to the Shard. Designed to complement the Shard and Place Buildings, the third piece of Piano‘s Bridge Developments will add “generous public realm amenities” to the area at ground level.

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