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Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater Damaged from Flooding

16:30 - 21 July, 2017
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pablosanchez/3145407730/'>Flickr user pablosanchez</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user pablosanchez licensed under CC BY 2.0

Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous house, Fallingwater, was the recipient of minor damage after heavy rainfall caused the creek that gives the house its name, Bear Run, to flood last weekend.

According to Fallingwater director Lynda Waggoner, a fallen log picked up by the overflow rammed into the stone wall of the lower plunge pool, breaking off the wall’s capstone and dislodging one of the home’s signature sculpture pieces, the Jacques Lipchitz’s “Mother and Child.” The cast bronze sculpture was selected for Fallingwater by Wright, and installed soon after its completion in 1939.

SOM Wins Competition to Master Plan Port City Colombo in Sri Lanka

14:00 - 21 July, 2017
SOM Wins Competition to Master Plan Port City Colombo in Sri Lanka, © SOM | Meshroom
© SOM | Meshroom

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), in collaboration with landscape architects Grant Associates, has been selected as the unanimous winner of the International Urban Design Ideas Competition for the Financial District and Marina District of the Port City Colombo, Sri Lanka. An extension of the existing Colombo Central Business District (CBD), the new Port City district will comprise a whopping 269 hectares of development, transforming the area into a hub for commerce, tourism, and culture.

© SOM | Meshroom © SOM | Meshroom © SOM | Meshroom © SOM | Meshroom +5

The UK’s Best Contemporary Architecture Celebrated in New Stamp Series

12:30 - 21 July, 2017
The UK’s Best Contemporary Architecture Celebrated in New Stamp Series, Courtesy of Royal Mail
Courtesy of Royal Mail

The UK’s postals service company, the Royal Mail, has launched a new special stamp series celebrating 10 buildings “that represent the renaissance of contemporary architecture in the UK of recent years,” including Zaha Hadid Architects’ London Aquatics Center, Herzog & de Meuron’s Switch House addition to the Tate Modern and Mecanoo’s Birmingham Library.

Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron. Image Courtesy of Royal Mail The Eden Project / Grimshaw Architects. Image Courtesy of Royal Mail Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins. Image Courtesy of Royal Mail Giants Causeway Visitor Centre / Heneghan & Peng Architects. Image Courtesy of Royal Mail +11

Renderings Revealed of Gehry Partners' Future Tree-Covered Playa Vista Office

12:30 - 20 July, 2017
Renderings Revealed of Gehry Partners' Future Tree-Covered Playa Vista Office , via LA Department of City Planning
via LA Department of City Planning

Renderings for a new office building in the Playa Vista neighborhood of Los Angeles designed by Gehry Partners have been revealed in documents released by the LA Department of City Planning. Called New Beatrice West, the eight-story development consists of a series of terraced glass boxes, capped with abundant vegetation aimed at contributing passive energy-efficiency to the complex. The new building will integrate an existing adjacent office building that currently houses the offices of Gehry Partners.

via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning +5

FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

04:00 - 20 July, 2017
FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Museo Soumaya, which opened to the public in 2011, is one of the more striking cultural landmarks on the skyline of Mexico City. Designed by FR-EE / Fernando Romero Enterprise, the space accommodates and displays a private art collection of nearly 70,000 works spanning the 15th to the mid-20th Centuries, including the world’s largest private collection of Auguste Rodin sculptures. In this photo-essay, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to this – a rotated rhomboid clad in a skin of 16,000 hexagonal mirrored-steel panels.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +38

2017 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist Announced for UK’s Best New Building

19:01 - 19 July, 2017
2017 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist Announced for UK’s Best New Building

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the shortlist of six projects competing for the 2017 Stirling Prize, the UK’s most prestigious award for architecture, given to the building “that has made the biggest contribution to the evolution of architecture in a given year.” Selected from the list of national award winners, the finalist buildings range from an elegantly detailed photographer’s studio in west London, to an immense new campus for the City of Glasgow College.

“This year’s shortlisted schemes show exceptionally creative, beautifully considered and carefully detailed buildings that have made every single penny count,” said RIBA President Jane Duncan. “Commissioned at the end of the recession, they are an accolade to a creative profession at the top of its game. Each of these outstanding projects has transformed their local area and delights those who are lucky enough to visit, live, study or work in them.

“This year’s shortlist typifies everything that is special about UK architecture: this is not just a collection of exceptionally well designed buildings but spaces and places of pure beauty, surprise and delight.”

The winner of the Stirling Prize will be announced on October 31st.

Little-Known Floating Concert Hall Designed by Louis Kahn Faces Demolition

16:00 - 19 July, 2017
Little-Known Floating Concert Hall Designed by Louis Kahn Faces Demolition, © <a href='http://https://www.flickr.com/photos/spablab/3789270610/in/photolist-6LR18U-6fVSsc-6HZDsy-6LLR7H-6HZrQ7/'>Flickr user spablab</a>. Licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
© Flickr user spablab. Licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

One of Louis Kahn’s most unique and lesser-known projects, the floating concert hall known as Point Counterpoint II, is at risk of demolition, reports the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.

Built from 1964 to ’67  as part of celebrations for the American Bicentennial, the 195-foot-long vessel has since been used as the waterborne home of the American Wind Symphony Orchestra (AWSO), allowing the group to take their own venue places as far away as Paris, France and St. Petersburg, Russia. Along with circular doorways and portholes, the structure features a 75-foot-wide stage that can be opened and closed using a hydraulic lift system.

Chicago Architecture Biennial Special Projects To Inhabit a Series of Architectural Landmarks

10:00 - 19 July, 2017
Chicago Architecture Biennial Special Projects To Inhabit a Series of Architectural Landmarks, Farnsworth House. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user Jonathan Rieke. (Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0)
Farnsworth House. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user Jonathan Rieke. (Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Chicago Architecture Biennial and it's artistic directors, Johnston Marklee, have revealed a collection of Special Projects designed to harness the curatorial vision of the event—entitled Make New History—and bring it to a number of significant landmarks in the city and in it's surrounding area. Featuring a SO-IL and Ana Prvački collaboration, a Francois Perrin installation, a new performance artwork by Gerard & Kelly at the Farnsworth House, photographs by James Welling, and films by Gerard & Kelly, the projects will inhabit some Chicago's greatest "architectural gems."

People Are Sharing this Puzzle that Supposedly Tests Whether You're "Smarter Than an Architect"

08:00 - 19 July, 2017
People Are Sharing this Puzzle that Supposedly Tests Whether You're "Smarter Than an Architect"

Over at The Guardian, mathematician Alex Bellos has an article series in which he asks readers to send their solutions to a weekly puzzle. That sounds innocent enough, but this week's installment might have caused architects to double-take: inspired by a reader who remembers it from his days as an architecture student, solving Monday's puzzle suggests that a reader is "smarter than an architect."

The puzzle itself looks somewhat like a child's block puzzle. Three holes—a square, circle, and triangle—are presented. But unlike a child's puzzle, in which you'd normally have square, circular and triangular blocks that fit the holes, the challenge here is to visualize a single block which would fit perfectly through all three holes.

Johnston Marklee Explain What Matters For This Year's Chicago Architecture Biennial

06:00 - 19 July, 2017

Two months before the much-anticipated opening of the Chicago Architecture Biennal, this video collaboration between Berlin-based PLANE–SITE and Chicago-based Spirit of Space offers an insight into what is to come this fall. The first video of the series delves into the core message that curators Mark Lee and Sharon Johnston of Johnston Marklee have established as the groundwork for contributions from over 100 international participants. One of the youngest biennials in the architectural scene, the Chicago Architecture Biennial is only in its second edition and is still defining the unique and independent traits that will help it stand out from other similar events.

The series from PLANE–SITE and Spirit of Space will unravel some of the Biennial's main themes, and delve into its program, reporting on such projects as the reinterpretations for Howells & Hood’s 1925 Tribune Tower; 3D responses to historical images of building interiors; a labyrinth of galleries that will host larger installations; and some of the biennial's anchor sites across the city of Chicago.

Studio Gang Unveils Community-Led Revitalization Masterplan for Memphis' Mississippi River

16:15 - 18 July, 2017
Studio Gang Unveils Community-Led Revitalization Masterplan for Memphis' Mississippi River , A variety of new amenities at Tom Lee Park, from an adventure playground to an elegant pavilion, would provide park users with many activity options in all seasons. Different types of trails would allow for different speeds of movement through the park, while areas of respite and shade encourage everyone to relax and take in the Mississippi. Image Courtesy of Studio Gang
A variety of new amenities at Tom Lee Park, from an adventure playground to an elegant pavilion, would provide park users with many activity options in all seasons. Different types of trails would allow for different speeds of movement through the park, while areas of respite and shade encourage everyone to relax and take in the Mississippi. Image Courtesy of Studio Gang

Studio Gang has unveiled plans for the revitalization of the Mississippi River waterfront in Memphis, Tennessee. Spanning a 6-mile stretch along a historic section of the river, the masterplan was developed in response to more than 4,500 survey responses and several public events, ensuring that the concept offers transformative ideas that relate to the entire Memphis community.

"The concept offers a series of actionable ideas meant to help the Riverfront achieve its potential as a shared, connected civic space for all Memphians to enjoy,” said Gia Biagi, principal of urbanism and civic impact at Studio Gang.

Courtesy of Studio Gang A variety of new plantings and structures that amplify Mud Island’s river ecology can help transform the peninsula into an active place offering a diverse array of opportunities for learning, teaching, research, gathering, and simply enjoying the outdoors. Image Courtesy of Studio Gang Elevating visitors above the river in Greenbelt Park, a thick arch of native trees directs views across the Mississippi and provides great habitat for birds and other animals. Below the walkway, visitors can explore a native wetland on foot or by kayak, depending on the rise and fall of the river. Image Courtesy of Studio Gang Masterplan Overview. Image Courtesy of Studio Gang +5

Shigeru Ban to Design Up to 20,000 New Homes for Refugees in Kenya

14:00 - 18 July, 2017
Shigeru Ban to Design Up to 20,000 New Homes for Refugees in Kenya, Shigeru Ban designed housing on the southeast coast of Sri Lanka, following the destruction caused by a 2004 tsunami. Image © Dominic Sansoni
Shigeru Ban designed housing on the southeast coast of Sri Lanka, following the destruction caused by a 2004 tsunami. Image © Dominic Sansoni

Pritzker Prize winning architect Shigeru Ban has signed an agreement with UN-Habitat, the United Nations agency tasked with guiding sustainable development, to design up to 20,000 new homes for refugees in Kenya’s Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement. Currently home to more than 37,000 refugees, the settlement is quickly outgrowing its original capacity of 45,000 – over 17,000 have arrived this year alone, with numbers expected to continue to increase.

“The key thing will be to design and construct shelter where no or little technical supervision is required, and use materials that are locally available and eco-friendly. It’s important that the houses can be easily maintained by inhabitants.”

BDP Selected to Restore London's Iconic Palace of Westminster

10:15 - 18 July, 2017
BDP Selected to Restore London's Iconic Palace of Westminster, Palace of Westminster, London. Image Courtesy of BDP
Palace of Westminster, London. Image Courtesy of BDP

Following a two year-long bidding process, British-based international practice BDP (Building Design Partnership) have been chosen to restore and safeguard the future of the Palace of Westminster, the seat of the United Kingdom's parliament. Outbidding Foster + Partners, Allies and Morrison, and HOK the project is expected to run into billions of pounds and could see the two chambers—the House of Commons and the House of Lords, plus all ancillary support staff—move out of the iconic building for to a decade.

Where Are the Hipsters in Your City? These Crowdsourced Maps Will Show You

08:00 - 18 July, 2017
Where Are the Hipsters in Your City? These Crowdsourced Maps Will Show You, Courtesy of Hoodmaps
Courtesy of Hoodmaps

Released this month, the website Hoodmaps offers a crowd-sourced mapping platform that gives users the ability to walk through a city like a local. By “painting” parts of the city using a palette of six colors that represent “uni”, “hipsters”, “tourists”, “rich”, “suits”, and “normies”, Hoodmaps aims to provide a quick visual representation of a city.

The website features a thousand of the largest cities from around the world and is constantly being edited with new user content that flags Google Maps with information about touristed zones of cities among other information. Creator Pieter Levels noted the need for such a service when traveling and being frustrated by the difficulty in finding culture-rich zones of a city as opposed to its commercialized ones.

How to Build A Tiki Bar in 18 Easy-to-Follow Steps

06:00 - 18 July, 2017

Although we’re conditioned to buy most of our furniture in one piece, or at least have it ready-to-build IKEA-style, there’s something special about creating something from scratch. Building something from its raw materials lets you see its journey from start to finish, with you learning about the craft it along the way, whether by yourself or with friends. The team at ArchDaily is sharing our very own built Tiki Bar – complete with instructions. Read on for some summer nostalgia you can build in your own backyard through a step by step Tiki DIY guide:

© Manuel Albornoz © Manuel Albornoz © Manuel Albornoz © Manuel Albornoz +28

Fabrizio Barozzi on Barozzi/Veiga's Obsessions, Process, and Position Within the Architectural Landscape

04:00 - 18 July, 2017
Fabrizio Barozzi on Barozzi/Veiga's Obsessions, Process, and Position Within the Architectural Landscape, Fine Arts Museum / Barozzi/Veiga. Image © Simon Menges
Fine Arts Museum / Barozzi/Veiga. Image © Simon Menges

In this episode of GSAPP Conversations, Fabrizio Barozzi—who co-founded the Barcelona-based practice Barozzi/Veiga with Alberto Veiga in 2004—discusses the practice's process and obsessions, including how they position themselves in the architectural landscape and why they are sceptical of defining their own architectural "language". For Barozzi, research and an engagement with history are integral to the way his practice works operates.

Undulating Brick Development Reimagines the Cornice in New York

16:30 - 17 July, 2017
Undulating Brick Development Reimagines the Cornice in New York, via NY YIMBY
via NY YIMBY

NY YIMBY has unearthed plans for a new mixed-use development at 540-544 Hudson in New York’s West Village. Designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, renderings show a brick building with a contemporary reimagining of the historic cornices found throughout the neighborhood.

Disney Unveils Plans for "Immersive" Star Wars Resort and New Theme Park Animation

12:25 - 17 July, 2017
Disney Unveils Plans for "Immersive" Star Wars Resort and New Theme Park Animation, © Disney/Lucasfilm. Image via <a href='http://https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2017/07/plans-unveiled-for-star-wars-inspired-themed-resort-at-walt-disney-world/'>Disney Parks Blog</a>. ImageEarly concept drawings for the hotel
© Disney/Lucasfilm. Image via Disney Parks Blog. ImageEarly concept drawings for the hotel

At the D23 Expo this past weekend, Disney announced plans for a new Star Wars hotel and resort at the Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, and revealed an animation of the upcoming Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge theme park that will bring the beloved galaxy into the present and not-so-far-away.

The revolutionary hotel has been envisioned as a completely “immersive” experience – visitors will each be given their own “story line” complete with “secret missions,” interacting with a full in-costume and in-character hotel staff. Early concepts for the resort show starship-themed spaces throughout, from the lobby to hotel rooms each featuring “a view into space.”

These Enormous Concrete Acoustic Mirrors Pepper the British Coastline

10:15 - 17 July, 2017
These Enormous Concrete Acoustic Mirrors Pepper the British Coastline, Denge (Greatstone-on-Sea, Kent, Great Britain). Image Courtesy of Tom Lee (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
Denge (Greatstone-on-Sea, Kent, Great Britain). Image Courtesy of Tom Lee (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

These vast concrete dishes, which can be found along the northern and easterly British coastline, are sound mirrors. Originally designed to capture the sounds of incoming enemy aircraft as they approached the United Kingdom from across the English Channel and the North Sea (although one was also built at Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq in Malta), these military listening devices acted as a rudimentary early warning system in the decades before Radar was developed and deployed.

Denge (Greatstone-on-Sea, Kent, Great Britain). Image Courtesy of Flickr User "Bodacea" (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0) Denge (Greatstone-on-Sea, Kent, Great Britain). Image Courtesy of Paul Russon (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0) Courtesy of Mark Duncan (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0) Denge (Greatstone-on-Sea, Kent, Great Britain). Image Courtesy of Hywel Williams (licensed under CC) +7

New Photographs Unveiled as China's First Design Museum Nears Completion in Shenzhen

16:00 - 15 July, 2017
New Photographs Unveiled as China's First Design Museum Nears Completion in Shenzhen, Courtesy of Design Society
Courtesy of Design Society

A series of new photographs of China’s “first major design museum” has been unveiled by Design Society, showing Pritzker Prize winner Fumihiko Maki’s design nearing completion in the Shekou district of Shenzhen. Commissioned by the duo of China Merchants Group (CMG) and the V&A Museum in London back in 2014, the project was envisioned as a catalyst for development in the city, given Shenzhen’s bustling creative sector of over 6,000 companies. 

As the photos display, the building is formed through three separate cantilevering volumes, which sit atop a plinth overlooking the waterfront. An exterior corner staircase leads to a number of publicly accessible rooftop terraces, inviting the public to engage with the building at various levels. Finishing touches are being added to the construction with the envelope already complete, while interior spaces and the site landscaping are still undergoing further polish and are yet to be fully resolved. Check out all the photographs of the building below, which will be occupied by Design Society upon completion.

Courtesy of Design Society Courtesy of Design Society Courtesy of Design Society Courtesy of Design Society +9

ReSITE 2017’s “The In/Visible City” Conference Unveils the Infrastructural Heart of Urbanism

09:30 - 15 July, 2017
ReSITE 2017’s “The In/Visible City” Conference Unveils the Infrastructural Heart of Urbanism, © PLANE—SITE
© PLANE—SITE

Now in its sixth year in its home city of Prague, reSITE is a conference that has consistently taken a broad view of urban issues, bringing together the largest concentration of the world’s top architects, urbanists, urban planners, landscape architects, and economists under umbrella topics such as Cities in Migration (2016), The Sharing City (2015), and Cities and Landscapes of the New Economy (2014). However, when it comes to events like this, such broad-ranging ambition can be a double-edged sword, flattening and obscuring the nitty gritty details of complex issues. Perhaps reflecting a concern that cities and the challenges they face be seen in full, reSITE 2017’s chosen theme was In/Visible City.

That particular lens reflects a shift in recent years for events such as this to bring into focus that which has typically remained firmly out of view: infrastructure. An allusion to the technical was manifest in the conference’s visual identity: a human heart, with pipe-like arteries and vegetation growing in between the cracks. The heart is to the body like infrastructure is to the city – but just as the body is much more than its circulatory system, the infrastructure cities depend upon is not limited to the obvious, billion-dollar construction projects that make headlines. Urban infrastructure spans all scales and numerous disciplines, ranging from design details to the small print in city policy. In/visible City brought forth the invisible features that give shape to the visible city demonstrating that cultural vitality, social fabric and citizen participation are infrastructural as well.

Oskar Zieta Inflates Steel Arches With Air to Create This Lightweight Pavillion

06:00 - 14 July, 2017
Oskar Zieta Inflates Steel Arches With Air to Create This Lightweight Pavillion, Courtesy of Oskar Zieta
Courtesy of Oskar Zieta

Polish architect, designer, and sculptor Oskar Zieta has unveiled his latest project: the arched NAWA pavilion on an island in Wroclaw, Poland. The pavilion forms part of the European Capital of Culture celebrations following the theme of “Metamorphoses of Culture” and was unveiled in June. The lightweight steel elements that make up the parametrically designed sculpture are made in a unique method called FiDU, a metal-inflating process created by Zieta during his PhD studies in ETH Zurich. Though Zieta has used FiDU successfully for various products (many exhibited in the Salone del Mobile in Milan), the NAWA Pavillion is the first project of this size to use the technology entirely, and is thus coined as “a manifesto of FiDU."

Courtesy of Oskar Zieta Courtesy of Oskar Zieta Courtesy of Oskar Zieta Courtesy of Oskar Zieta +50

Model-Making in Miniature: Ali Alamedy's Nostalgic and Painstakingly Precise Tiny Worlds

04:00 - 14 July, 2017
Model-Making in Miniature: Ali Alamedy's Nostalgic and Painstakingly Precise Tiny Worlds, Ali Alamedy's miniature worlds. Image via The New York Times
Ali Alamedy's miniature worlds. Image via The New York Times

Although trained as a Control and Computer Engineer, Ali Alamedy has since turned his hand to manufacturing scaled, miniature dioramas. After being forced to leave his home in Iraq, he and his family are now based in Turkey – and it is here that he has honed a skill in constructing these tiny, intricate worlds from a broad range of ordinary materials. All scaled at 1:12, these complex and often hyper-realistic models are inspired by the environments around him, complemented by his experiences and, of course, his imagination. In this study of Alamedy's work, ArchDaily asks: how do you do it?

"Italian Façade". Image © Ali Alamedy "New York City". Image © Ali Alamedy "Kid's Room". Image © Ali Alamedy "Pipes Warehouse". Image © Ali Alamedy +24

This Accurate, Augmented Reality Virtual Ruler Is Pretty Impressive

18:00 - 13 July, 2017

Not many people would consider augmented reality particularly useful; it makes for fun dog selfies and other filtered images. But our tunes will probably change with the release of AR Measure™, an app that turns your phone into an accurate ruler. Using augmented reality, the app can calculate distances in 3D spaces captured with your phone's camera.  

Created by Laan Labs, the same company who brought us FaceSwap, the app is developed on top of Apple's ARKit framework. How does it work, you ask?