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Village: The Latest Architecture and News

In Times of Need: Architects Stepping Up in Humanitarian Crisis

Hard times bring people together. In recent years we have seen how collective work can be a driving force to help those affected by natural or man-made disasters. After a disaster or displacement, a safe physical environment is often essential. Therefore, the need for coordination becomes a key factor in assisting people in times of need.

Architects, as "Shelter Specialists", play an important role in creating safe and adequate environments, whether it is individual housing, public buildings, schools, or emergency tent camps. But as architect Diébédo Francis Kéré says, "When you have nothing and you want to convince your community to believe in an idea, it may happen that everybody starts working with you, but you need to keep fighting to convince them."

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The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India

An ancient Indian folktale narrates the story of a demigod, Hiranyakashipu, who was granted a boon of indestructibility. He wished for his death to never be brought about by any weapon, human or animal, not at day or night, and neither inside nor outside his residence. To cease his wrathful ways, Lord Vishnu took the form of a half-human-half-animal to slay the demigod at twilight at the threshold of his house.

Threshold architectural spaces have always held deep cultural meaning to the people of India. In-between spaces are found in the midst of daily activities as courtyards, stairways, and verandas. The entrance to the house is revered by Indians of all social backgrounds. Throughout the country’s varied landscape, transitional entry spaces are flanked by distinctive front verandas that merge the street with the house.

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Valentino Gareri Atelier Designs Prototype for Circular Economy Village In Australia

Valentino Gareri Atelier has been selected to design the pilot project for a circular economy village model that aims to redefine urban sprawl through sustainability and diverse programming. Comprising eight residential hamlets with co-working and entertainment spaces, The Spiral Village will be created using emerging 3D printing methods and will foster circularity through a waste-to-resources hub, a diverse regenerative agricultural system, a sustainable water management system and renewable energy.

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SOM to Design Convertible Self-Sufficient Milan-Cortina Olympic Village

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill was selected to design the Olympic Village for the 2026 Milan-Cortina Olympics following an international competition of 71 architecture studios from nine different countries. The project is part of the updated Porta Romana Railway Yard Master Plan, and will create a new center of activity in Porta Romana with minimal environmental impact. The self-sufficient project will feature residential, commercial, and public spaces, that change configurations based on the Olympics event.

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Valentino Gareri Atelier Proposes a New Model of 3D Printed Residential Village

Valentino Gareri Atelier have joined forces with technology and wellness consultant Steve Lastro of 6Sides and global wellness real estate innovators Delos to create Sunflower Village, a humanistic and sociological approach to residential technology & community living. The proposed residential village includes 19 homes arranged in a sunflower composition that 'follows the sun'.

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Warka Water and Arturo Vittori Create Integrated Village for the Rainforest Community in Cameroon

Under construction in the tropical rainforest of Cameroon, Warka Village is an integrated space for the Pygmy community, an isolated society located in the Mvoumagomi area. Constructed using only natural materials and ancient local construction techniques, the project, created by Warka Water and Italian architect Arturo Vittori, is currently operational, and expected to be completed in 2022.

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Ondřej Císler and Petr Tej Design Concrete Bridge Over a Stream in the Czech Republic

Ondřej Císler from Aoc architects and Petr Tej from the Klokner Institute at CTU in Prague have designed a bridge over the Dřetovice stream in Vrapice, near the city of Kladno in the Czech Republic.

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Shanghai Nanxiang Neighborhood Center / XYP Design+Technology

Shanghai Nanxiang Neighborhood Center  / XYP Design+Technology - Featured Image
© Xun Yu

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Luoqi Xitang Village B&B Hotel / Monolith Architects

Luoqi Xitang Village B&B Hotel / Monolith Architects - Featured Image
Elevation along south side pool. Image © Lei Mao

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Tianjin, China
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  1069
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Kohler, Tusjzc, Xinbu Floor

Clan Hall X / Atelier Lai

Clan Hall X  / Atelier Lai - Adaptive Reuse, Facade, Door
Exterior. Image © Xuguo Tang

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Between Square and Circle: Xinnan Kindergarten / Jin Niu

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  • Architects: Jin Niu
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  3900
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  泉州宏盛建材厂

Can Architecture Save China’s Rural Villages? DnA’s Xu Tiantian Thinks So

Can Architecture Save China’s Rural Villages? DnA’s Xu Tiantian Thinks So - Featured Image
Bamboo Pavilion. Image © Zhou Ruogo

Travel seven hours by car in a Southwest direction from Shanghai and you will arrive in Songyang County. The name is unfamiliar to many Chinese people, and even more foreign to those living abroad. The county consists of about 400 villages, from Shicang to Damushan.

Here, undulating lush green terraces hug the sides of Songyin river valley, itself the one serpentine movement uniting the lands. Follow the river and you will see: here, a Brown Sugar Factory; there, a Bamboo Theatre; and on the other side, a stone Hakka Museum built recently but laid by methods so old, even the town masons had to learn these ways for the first time, as if they were modern methods, as if they were revolutionary.

And maybe they are. Songyang County, otherwise known as the “Last Hidden Land in Jiangnan,” may look like a traditional Chinese painting with craggy rock faces, rice fields and tea plantations, but it has also become a model example of rural renaissance. Beijing architect Xu Tiantian, of the firm DnA_Design and Architecture, has spent years surveying the villages of Songyang, talking to local County officials and residents, and coming up with what she calls “architectural acupunctures.”

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S.Misagh Architecture & Planning Creates an Edgy Alternative to Antiquated Classrooms

How do you make school fun and sustainable in the age of technology? S.Misagh Architecture and Planning's design for an Iranian village school creates an edgy alternative to the antiquated classroom. The firm's three principle concepts for their Deh-e Now Village School — identity, knowledge, and the natural environment— allow students an array of opportunities for interactive engagement with their surroundings.

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Open Call: AIM Bamboo Architecture Competition for the Village of Rural Makers

The countryside carries so much emotional weight and nostalgia through thousands of years of time. Currently, more than 100 villages disappear every day in China. On the other hand, the rise of city living standards and GDP require a more suitable tourist experience in the surviving villages. How can we combine the inheritance and preservation of villages with a countryside tourism business model? To provide a better ecosystem for lodge and inn, farm, organic agriculture and handmade crafts is the challenge that we are facing now!

Gallery: Mystical Photos of an Abandoned Chinese Village

Traces of human life lingering behind, forms carving their way through the land and sky, objects left in disuse and air that seems frozen in time -- whether morbid or sublime, abandoned buildings and settlements are an object of fascination and intrigue to architects and non-architects alike. As Shanghai-based photographer Jane Qing's photos of an abandoned village on Gouqi Island in China demonstrate, there is a rare kind of beauty to be found in the left-behind and the neglected.

See more photos after the break.