How Venezuela’s Espacios de Paz Project is Transforming Community Spaces

Petare, La Y 5 de Julio / Caracas [TXP Todo por La Praxis + PGRC + Pico Estudio
The Espacios de Paz (Spaces for Peace) project in is turning “zones of danger” into “zones of peace” through participatory design in violent areas of the country. Led by Venezuelan firm PICO Estudio, Espacios de Paz was a six-week long workshop that involved five groups of architects from both Venezuela as well as internationally. Each group focused on developing a project in a community with a high presence of violence. By transforming unused spaces such as empty plots and unregulated landfill areas, the projects sought to create “social dynamics that invite new ways of living in communities, transforming categories that rule the daily life: the use of time and space.” Community involvement in project development was also key to the Espacios de Paz initiative, which sought to  create “a space built not only “for” the community but “by” the community.”

Read on after the break to see the projects that were implemented…

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ARCHIWINDOW: A Glimpse Through “The Eyes of Architecture”

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In his latest series, ARCHIWINDOW, Federico Babina draws some inspiration perhaps from the headline exhibition the Venice Biennale, investigating some of the most famous window designs architecture has to offer. Babina simply says it is ”a little reflection about architecture and the elements that compose it.”

The images reveal how expressive the element of the window can be, as many of the 25 signature designs will be instantly recognizable for die-hard architecture fans, while others may reveal a previously-unrecognized trend in the work of a particular architect.

“The windows are the eyes of architecture. Through the windows enters the light and shadow that creates spaces. The windows invite us to enter the landscape, and are the cracks through which to spy on architecture,” writes Babina. “I tried to transform a detail into the protagonist to emphasize its expressive capacity. A single window can open up a world of information. It allows you to lean out to find clues of the stylistic and linguistic aesthetics of architecture.”

Take a look at all 25 drawings in the ARCHIWINDOW series after the break. And don’t miss Federico Babina‘s other (very popular) illustration sets: ARTISTECT, ARCHISET, ARCHIMACHINE, ARCHIPORTRAIT, ARCHIST, ARCHIBET and ARCHICINE.

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AD Round Up: Canadian Architecture to Be Thankful For

The Crystal, extension to the Royal Ontario Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind. Image © Andrew Rowat

Today marks Canadian Thanksgiving, and to celebrate the occasion we’ve rounded up some of Canada’s best architecture. Our five selections represent five Canadian cities, each with a unique architectural sensibility. We begin in Toronto with the Royal Ontario Museum addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a striking intervention using prisms of glass and steel fused to a 102-year-old museum structure; next we go to Montréal for Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, an interlocking modular housing project designed for the World Exposition of 1967; to Calgary for Santiago Calatrava‘s understated Peace Bridge, a stunning glass-encased red lightning bolt spanning the city’s widest waterway; then to Winnipeg‘s Old Market Square Stage by emerging firm 5468796 Architecture, a chameleonic performance space wrapped by a mesh curtain of steel cubes; and finally to the outskirts of Vancouver for the Richmond Olympic Oval, a masterpiece of engineering and the centre of attention during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Enjoy, eh.

Glasgow School of Art Begins Search for Restoration Architect

© Gordon Hawes Via The Mac Photographic Archive

To repair the damage caused by May’s devastating fire, the Glasgow School of Art is searching for a team to carry out the restoration of Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s celebrated building. Following the overwhelming public support for restoration instead of a contemporary reinterpretation, the selected team will be required to return the building to its original condition over a predicted construction period of five years. More on the restoration after the break.

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Li Xiaodong Wins The Inaugural Moriyama RAIC International Prize

The Liyuan Library. Image Courtesy of RAIC / Li Xiaodong Studio

The Royal Architecture Institute of Canada (RAIC) have announced that Li Xiaodong has been awarded the inaugural Moriyama International Prize, named after esteemed Canadian architect Raymond Moriyama. The prize, which comes with a monetary value of CAD$100,000, has been established to recognise buildings that are judged to be “transformative, inspired as well as inspiring, and emblematic of the human values of respect and inclusiveness.”

The jury deliberated projects submitted from nine countries: , China, France, Germany, Israel, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and Tajikistan. According to the citation, the jury was “impressed by the breadth of international interest in the prize and encouraged by the high level of engagement with the aims and objectives of the program revealed in the submissions.” The prize is open to all architects irrespective of nationality and location and seeks to recognise a single work of architecture (as opposed to a life’s work), celebrating buildings in use.

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Competition Entry: OYO’s Kortrijk Campus Scheme Awarded Second Prize

© OYO – Open Y Office

OYO – Open Y Office, together with Arch&Teco, has received second prize among nine participants in an invited competition for a new Howest campus building in .

“We envision this new campus as an interactive field where we catch the classrooms in the middle; conceived as areas of focus. This field contains lecture rooms, informal meeting spaces, restaurant, bar, shop and lounge areas and wraps around the area of focus; connecting the park all the way up to the roof garden where students, teachers, alumni, companies and neighbors are invited to shop and exchange knowledge.”

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Spotlight: César Pelli

Courtesy of Construye

“[Architecture can be defined as] giving an appropriate response and an adequate artistic interpretation of the problems that are faced in each project.”

Argentine architect César Pelli (born October 12, 1926) is known for designing some of the tallest buildings in the world, including the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, the Torre Cristal in Madrid and Costanera Center in Santiago, Chile.

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The Latest 99% Invisible: Hundertwasser and His Fight Against the Godless Line

Hot Springs Village, Bad Blumau, Styria, Austria. Image © Flickr CC User Enrico Carcasci

In the latest episode of his 99% Invisible podcast, digs into the work of lesser-known architect Tausendsassa Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser. Often cited for his colorful and curvilinear forms, his name translates to “Multi-Talented Peace-Filled Rainy Day Dark-Colored Hundred Waters.” In everything from his name to his unusual ideas put forth in manifestos, it is immediately evident that Hundertwasser was no ordinary architect. Listen to the podcast and check out some of Hundertwasser’s works after the break.

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Spotlight: Richard Meier

© Richard Phibbs

“When I am asked what I believe in, I say that I believe in architecture. Architecture is the mother of the arts. I like to believe that architecture connects the present with the past and the tangible with the intangible.”

, the Pritzker Prize and AIA Gold Medal winning architect, is well known for his abstracted, often white, buildings and unrelenting personal design philosophy. Citing Bernini and Borromini as influences as well as Le Corbusier and Louis Kahn, Meier received his Bachelor in Architecture from Cornell University in 1957 and took jobs with Skidmore Owings and Merrill and Marcel Breuer soon after his graduation. He began his own private practice in New York in 1963 and rocketed to architectural fame in the early 1970s, after being named as one of the “New York Five.”

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Women in the Workplace: How Does Architecture Compare?

via FiveThirtyEight

How do architects stack up against other professions on male/female ratio? Recent data on workers in the United States reveals some compelling information on where women are working – and where men hold sway. Construction work leans heavily male, while research and analyst work is led by women. Where does architecture fit on the scale? See the full infographic showing the percentage of men versus women in architecture after the break.

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Red Architecture Wins Top New Zealand Prize for “Innovative Black Barn”

Modern Barn Form / . Image Courtesy of ADNZ

Red Architecture’s “innovative black barn” has been awarded the ADNZ‘s (Architectural Designers ) 2014 Supreme National Design Award for its “subtle, economical and clever design.” Located in the beautiful rural landscape of Whatawhata in the Waikato, the project houses a private residence and garage within two “crisp barn-like forms” clad in vertical run steel and recycled bricks taken from the devastation caused by the Christchurch earthquakes.

In addition to the Supreme Award winner, eight designs from across the country were presented Resene Architectural Design Awards at the ceremony. View a glimpse of each awarded project, after the break.

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Competition Entry: Pedro Livni + Fernando De Rossa’s Proposal for Dalseong Citizen’s Gymnasium

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Pedro Livni and Fernando De Rossa have shared with us their proposal for the Dalseong Citizen’s Gymnasium open ideas competition, which was awarded honorable mention. As part of the district’s centennial anniversary, the competition aimed to replace an existing, outdated sports hall with a new gymnasium complex for the local residents of Hyeonpung-myeon neighborhood within the Daegu district of Dalseong-gun.

drozdov&partners were ultimately crowned as winners of the competition, however you can review Pedro Livni and Fernando De Rossa after the break.

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Maya Lin Wins $300,000 Gish Prize

/ Maya Lin

Maya Lin has been selected to receive the 21st Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, a $300,000 award presented annually to “a man or woman who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life.”

The artist and architect, who first rose to fame with her design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, was chosen from 100 nominees spanning across all fields of the arts. She was lauded for her “last memorial” - What Is Missing? - in which she has been developing for the past seven years in hopes to raise awareness about the degradation of our planet and rapid extinction of the world’s animals and plants.

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See The Most Over Budget Projects of All Time Ranked in this Infographic

Courtesy of Podio

One thousand nine hundred and ninety: the percentage by which the $3 billion Montreal Olympic Stadium - a project designated only $148 million in 1973 – exceeded its original budgetTen: the number of years that the Sydney Opera House was over its deadline. Twenty-four: the number of projects included in Monumental Budget Busters, an interactive infographic ranking an array of works - ranging from the International Space Station to the Sochi Olympics - from smallest to largest in cost and time overruns. The list includes infrastructure, architecture, and governmental projects with budget overruns ranging from $210 million to $68 billion. These costs beg the question – does the end justify the means? Find out with the interactive infographic after the break.

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Who Should Win the Stirling Prize? The BBC Invites You to Cast Your Vote

The RIBA and the have partnered to screen a series of interactive online films in the final week leading up to the announcement of the 18th RIBA Stirling Prize. As the UK’s most prestigious architecture award, given annually to “the architects of the building that has made the greatest contribution to the evolution of architecture over the past year,” the shortlist has garnered worldwide attention. Although the ultimate decision lies in the hands of a jury, headed by British architect Spencer de Grey, the BBC will host a public vote which is available as of today.

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Call for Entries: Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence 2015

RBA 2013 Winner: Via Verde / Dattner Architects + Grimshaw Architects. Image © David Sundberg

The Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence (RBA) has opened their 2015 call for applications. The biennial award celebrates urban places that are distinguished by quality design and their social and economic contributions to our nation’s cities. Winners offer creative placemaking solutions that transcend the boundaries between architecture, urban design and planning and showcase innovative thinking about American cities. One Gold Medal of $50,000 and four Silver Medals of $10,000 will be awarded. Projects must be a real place, not just a plan or a program, and be located in the 48 contiguous United States. Award winners may use prize money in any way that benefits the project. The deadline for entries is December 9, 2014. Learn how to apply here

Drozdov&Partners Selected to Design Dalseong Citizen’s Gymnasium

© Drozdov&Partners

Ukrainian practice drozdov&partners has been announced as winners of an open ideas competition for the Dalseong Citizen’s Gymnasium. As part of the district’s centennial anniversary, the competition aims to replace an existing, outdated sports hall with a new gymnasium complex for the local residents of Hyeonpung-myeon, a neighborhood within the district of Dalseong-gun.

The winning design favors a minimalist approach, integrating a “simple volume” within the hillside site that reactivates an existing public plaza and sports hall, while strengthens its connection to the surrounding neighborhoods, schools and city transit.

Construction is expected to begin in 2015. More project information and images, after the break.

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View from the Top: Instagrammer Climbs NYC’s Tallest Building

Photo taken from 432 Park Ave, looking West. Image © Demid Lebedev

“The higher you get the lonelier the world seems.”

Seventeen-year-old Demid Lebedev, better known by his Instagram username Demidism, recently climbed to the top of 432 Park Avenue, capturing unprecedented views from what will be New York City’s tallest residential building. “I went to heaven and back,” writes Lebedev in one of the photo’s captions. Surrounded in fog, Lebedev captures views from distinct levels of the building, which is currently in its final stage of construction. 432 Park Avenue will top out at 1,398 feet, surpassing One57 and earning the crown as the city’s tallest residential building when it opens in 2015.

Yet following his climb, Lebedev was arrested and charged with criminal trespass and reckless endangerment, local press reported.

We caught up with Lebedev to learn what it’s like to climb to the top of the city’s tallest buildings and how the city changes as it extends upward. Read what Lebedev had to say and enjoy his stunning photos after the break.

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