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Carlo Ratti Associati: The Latest Architecture and News

Carlo Ratti Associati and Engineer Michel Virlogeux Propose a Replacement for the Collapsed Baltimore Bridge

Following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Maryland, construction group WeBuild, in collaboration with design office CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati and engineer Michel Virlogeux, has revealed an updated design for a replacement bridge. The new cable-stayed design aims to redefine the entrance to the Baltimore Harbor and offer an improved version of this symbol of the city.

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Designing the Future of Energy: An Exhibition on Design's Role in the Matter Opens at Vitra Design Museum

The Vitra Design Museum presents 'Transform! Designing the Future of Energy', an exhibition running from March 23rd to September 1st, 2024. As energy stands as the cornerstone of modern society, the subject encompasses political, social, and environmental dimensions. The exhibition aims to highlight design’s role in the effort to transform the energy sector into a more efficient, reliable, and sustainable one, relying more on renewable sources, smart mobility systems, and moving towards self-sufficient cities.

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Carlo Ratti Associati Transforms Refinery Plant into Clean Battery Park in Italy

Carlo Ratti Associati has just revealed its designs for a waterfront green energy park in Trieste, Italy. Initially a disused petroleum refinery, the initiative seeks to bridge the gap between the city’s industrial past and a sustainable future by repurposing oil storage tanks into renewable energy solutions. Dubbed “water batteries,” the repurposed oil storage tanks are linked to the Adriatic Sea.

Coldefy and Carlo Ratti Associati Reveal Design of the French Pavilion for Expo Osaka 2025

French architecture studio Coldefy and Italian architecture practice CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati have unveiled ‘Theatrum Naturae’, or ‘Theatre of Nature,’ the project selected as France’s national pavilion at Expo Osaka 2025. The proposal welcomes both natural and artificial habitats, aiming to illustrate how design can connect human and non-human worlds while showcasing France’s contribution to culture and the natural environment. In the exhibition, the visitors will be invited to explore France’s multiple ecosystems and rediscover a connection to nature.

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Carlo Ratti Appointed Curator of the 2025 Venice Architecture Biennale

The Board of Directors of La Biennale di Venezia has just announced Carlo Ratti as the next curator of the International Architecture Exhibition. The 19th exhibition will take place in 2025, from May 24 to November 23. The appointment was recommended by President Roberto Cicutto, and has the support of Pietrangelo Buttafuoco, President of La Biennale di Venezia for the four-year term March 2024-2027.

Carlo Ratti Associati Designs Kinetic Solutions to Flooding, Transforming Turin's Waterfront in Italy

Carlo Ratti Associati has revealed the design transformation of Turin’s historic waterfront in Italy. The project’s main aim is to address the current climate crisis and leverage architectural solutions to create spaces that can withstand the recurring floods of the Po River. Throughout the scheme, many architectural elements are kinetic, allowing them to rise above the water. “Floating Above the Floods” creates new solutions for urban climate adaptations and provides insights into universal strategies for urban waterways.

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When Mixed-Use Architecture Uses Open Facades to Make Friends

Let’s talk. Good communication is key to building and maintaining working relationships, be they personal, romantic, business, or geopolitical. The importance of communication with and respect for one’s neighbors is a lesson that has featured heavily in many texts and teachings from all religions and cultures for millennia, possibly sparking civilization itself. 

Some of the fastest growing economies are keen to shout from their garden rooftops about their growing environmentalism, infrastructure, attractive investment opportunities, and rising architectural scene, but also to keep alive the history and culture of their past, and build socially active environments.

These four building projects from across East Asia and Europe both visually and symbolically invite guests inside to see how they operate, building positive relationships with residents of the building and the city, and visitors from beyond.

Kengo Kuma's Proposal for the Egyptian Museum Expansion in Torino Creates New Urban Axis

Kengo Kuma and Associates have just been awarded second place in an architecture competition to design the expansion and renovation of the Egyptian Museum in Torino, Italy. It served for many decades as the primary civic space in Turin, with its public areas closed off from the rest of the city. Kengo Kuma’s proposal aims to recreate the public plaza, a city center covered by a thin glass canopy. Founded in 1824 and is the oldest museum for Ancient Egyptian culture, the Egyptian Museum in Torino held a competition earlier this year and received entries by Pininfarina Architecture, Carlo Ratti Associati, and Snøhetta. The winning project by OMA / David Gianotten and Andreas Karavanas will transform the museum into a cultural space, creating one covered courtyard and a series of connected urban rooms within the existing settlement.

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The 15 Winners of the 2023 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards

After another successful selection process, with over 150,000 votes cast during the last 3 weeks, the collective intelligence of our community has helped us to highlight and recognize the best recent architecture projects. The 75 finalists, which is already a winners list, are a testament to the innovative and diverse ways in which architecture responds to the challenges of our built environment.

The scale of this award is a reflection of how important architecture is today, as the deepening complexity of our world places increasing pressure and demands upon our built environment. To deal with issues such as the climate crisis, energy scarcity, population density, social inequality, housing shortages, fast-moving urbanization, diminished local identity, and a lack of diversity, architecture needs to open itself. We are happy to see how the question posed by this award has gained global attraction. Voices from outside of the architectural profession stated: “This is what we consider good architecture”, due to its impact and symbolism, as seen on Globo or El País. Architectural recognition goes beyond its usual professional borders, and is able to motivate, rejoice and excite an ever growing number of people who understand the importance of our built environment and its impact on quality of life.

The winners are a concrete example of what society recognizes as good architecture, but also of what it demands from it. We take the responsibility to continue building on the spirit of the award, strengthening the expert’s choice and the contribution that our community makes based on their preferences and selections throughout the year, together with the voice of a wider community.

The ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards is brought to you thanks to Dornbracht, renowned for leading designs for architecture, which can be found internationally in bathrooms and kitchens.

Carlo Ratti Associati Explore Energy Sharing with the World’s Largest Urban Solar Farm for Expo 2030 in Rome

CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati, together with architect Italo Rota and urbanist Richard Burdett, unveiled the master plan for Rome’s bid to host the World Expo in 2030. The project proposes a joint effort from every participating country to contribute to a solar farm that could power the exhibition site and help decarbonize the surrounding neighborhoods. The Expo is proposed to take place in Tor Vergata, a vast area in Rome and home to the eponymous university and a densely inhabited residential district. All the pavilions are designed to be fully reusable, as the area is proposed to be transformed into an innovation district after the event in the hope of revitalizing the somewhat neglected neighborhood. The master plan was developed with several partners, including ARUP for sustainability, infrastructure, and costing, LAND for landscape design, and Systematica for mobility strategy.

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CRA and Italo Rota Transform an 18th-Century Hospital Complex in Italy with the Addition of a Kinetic Roof

CRA - Carlo Ratti Associati and architect Italo Rota have developed a project to transform an 18th-century hospital complex in Modena, Italy, into a multidisciplinary cultural and innovation hub. The master plan for the new hub, called AGO Modena Fabbriche Culturali, includes an origami-inspired kinetic roof designed in collaboration with artist-engineer Chuck Hoberman. The feature will cover a triangular-shaped plaza in the center of the complex. The restoration plan also aims to create flexibility so that the structure can easily adapt to changing future configurations.