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ArchDaily Editors Select 20 (More) Amazing 21st Century Museums

In honor of International Museum Day we’ve collected twenty compelling museum projects. In this round up you’ll find a truly global selection; from Wang Shu's Ningbo Historic Museum in China and Tod Williams + Billie Tsien's Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia to Monoblock's Contemporary Art Museum in Buenos Aires, see all of our editors’ favorites after the break!

4 Ways Cold-Climate Cities Can Make The Most Of Their Waterfronts

Urban waterfronts have historically been the center of activity for many cities. They began as economic, transportation and manufacturing hubs, but as most industries changed their shipping patterns and consolidated port facilities, many industrial waterfronts became obsolete. In Europe, smaller historic ports were easily converted to be reused for leisure activities. However, in North America, where the ports were larger, it was more difficult to convert the waterfronts due to logistical and contamination issues.

Over the past 40 years or so, architects and urban planners have started to recognize the redevelopment potential for waterfronts across the United States and Canada, and the impact they can have on the financial and social success of cities. Though cold-climate cities pose a unique challenge for waterfront development, with effective planning waterfront cities with freezing winter months can still take advantage of the spaces year-round.

Chaudière Island project in Ottawa. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Solar study for Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will

Perkins+Will's CIRS Building Wins RAIC's Green Building Award

Perkins+Will's Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) at the University of British Columbia has been announced as the recipient of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada's 2015 Green Building Award. Granted by the RAIC and Canada Green Building Council, the award celebrates stellar architectural designs adhering to responsiveness to occupants' well-being and environmental responsibility. The CIRS achieved LEED Platinum status and is a regenerative structure, implementing ingenious strategies to sustain net-positive energy, net-zero water, and net-zero carbon in both construction and operation.

Perkins+Will’s “Sleek” Manhattan Tower to Feature Five Open-Air Gardens

© Perkins+Will / MIR
© Perkins+Will / MIR

Conceptual plans of Perkins+Will’s East 37th Street Residential Tower in New York City have been unveiled. Debuted in Cannes, France, during MIPIM, where the high-rise received a “Future Projects Award,” the 700-foot-tall Manhattan tower boasts a “shimmering, angled curtain wall” organized by five clusters of shared amenities and open-air gardens.

More about the 65-story, 150,000-square-foot condominium tower, after the break. 

BIG, Heatherwick and The Living Named Among Fast Company's Most Innovative Architectural Practices of 2015

Fast Company has announced who they believe to be the most innovative practices in architecture for 2015. Topping this list is the online remodeling community Houzz, the BIG powerhouse and David Benjamin’s The Living. See the complete list, after the break, and let us know who you believe is the world’s most innovative firms in the comment section below.

Recycling In Practice: Perkins + Will Finds New Life for Cardboard Tubes

In architectural offices, the cardboard tubes used in large-format rolls of paper seem to multiply at an alarming rate, populating every nook and cranny until they fill the rafters. The team at Perkins + Will Boston have invented a cheeky solution to stem cardboard tube proliferation in the form of a privacy screen that behaves simultaneously as a sound and visual barrier, and as a storage space. Composed of dozens of reclaimed cardboard tubes fitted into a CAD-mapped and cut plywood frame, the 'wall' provides ample opportunities for drawing storage, sunlight mitigation, and playful interaction without disrupting workflow.

Find out more about Perkins + Will's solution to cardboard tube waste after the break

Courtesy of Perkins + Will  Implementation plan . Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will Courtesy of Perkins + Will  Phase one installed. Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will

How to Design Offices for Clients Who Have Bigger Problems Than Design

We spend a lot of time and effort debating and researching how to design the perfect office - perhaps too much time, according to Rachel Casanova, a Principle and Director of Workplace at Perkins + Will. In this post, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "When the Open Office Isn't Always the Problem or Solution", Casanova argues that we ought to be thinking about office design more holistically, taking into account not just the physical space of the office, but also how the client runs their workplace. At best, design can catalyse a more nurturing office environment, but for each company the way to achieve this may be different; there is no 'one-size-fits-all' office solution. Read on after the break to find out why.

Why Tall Wooden Buildings are On the Rise: An Interview with Perkins+Will's Wood Expert

Material Minds, presented by ArchDaily Materials, is our new series of short interviews with architects, designers, scientists, and others who use architectural materials in innovative ways. Enjoy!

Wood. The United States is the largest producer of the natural resource in the world. But yet we rarely see it in commercial, high-rise construction. So we asked a wood expert -- Rebecca Holt at Perkins+Will, an analyst for reThink Wood's recent Tall Wood Survey  -- to tell us about its potential benefits. 

AD: Why is wood a material architects should use in taller buildings?

There are lots of reasons to consider wood – first it has a lower environmental impact than other traditional choices like concrete and steel.  Wood is the only major building material that is made the by sun and is completely renewable.

RAIC Honors Peter Busby with Gold Medal

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada has named Peter Busby the 2014 recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal, the highest honor awarded by the organization. Since founding his Vancouver practice in 1984, Busby has built a reputation for being a “powerful catalyst in the growth of the green architecture movement,” a pioneer in sustainability. In 2004, Busby merged his firm with Perkins+Will. He now serves as the Managing Director of Perkins+Will’s San Francisco office. More information on Busby and the award, here

Perkins+Will Selected to Design Prentice Replacement

Northwestern University has selected Perkins+Will to design the new 600,000 square foot Biomedical Research Building for the Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Planned for the site of Bertrand Goldberg’s recently demolished Prentice Woman’s Hospital, the new building will “anchor the University’s research facilities and be the hub of a world-class research and development enterprise that attracts innovation and entrepreneurship.”

Northwestern Unveils Potential Replacements for Prentice

Northwestern University has unveiled three final proposals that are in the running to replace Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Woman’s Hospital, which is currently being demolished in Chicago after a long, high-profile preservation battleThe shortlisted architects - Goettsch Partners and Ballinger, Perkins + Will, and Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture and Payette - have each proposed a two-phased plan for the 600,000 square-foot Biomedical Research Building, which is intended to become a “world-class research and development enterprise” that serves as an “anchor” for the Feinberg School of Medicine’s research facilities.

View the shortlisted proposals after the break...

2013 Great Places Award Winners Announced

Seven exemplary projects in architecture, planning, landscape architecture, and urban design have been named winners of the 2013 Great Places Awards and were honored during the 44th annual conference of the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) earlier this month. The EDRA Great Places Awards recognizes professional and scholarly excellence in environmental design and pay special attention to the relationship between physical form and human activity or experience.

The winners after the break...

AIA Selects Four Projects for National Healthcare Design Awards

Massachusetts General Hospital - The Lunder Building; Boston / NBBJ
Massachusetts General Hospital - The Lunder Building; Boston / NBBJ

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) has announced four recipients of the AIA National Healthcare Design Awards program. The awards program highlights the “best of healthcare building design and healthcare design-oriented research” that exhibit “conceptual strengths that solve aesthetic, civic, urban, and social concerns as well as the requisite functional and sustainability concerns of a hospital”. The AIA National Healthcare Design Award recipients are:

The Transparency Project / Perkins + Will

Everyday, Americans all over the country go to work. They get in their cars, arrive at the office, and sit inside. Then, they go home, maybe watch some TV, and go to bed. 5 days a week. About 50 weeks a year. Our built environment is where we now spend about 90% of our time. Unluckily for us, however, a recent Forbes article suggests that, most of the time, indoor air quality is actually worse than outdoor, to the point where it’s potentially hazardous: “paint, carpet, countertops, dry wall, you name it and chances are it’s got some sort of toxic ingredient.” And yet we have little way of knowing just how bad our building’s “ingredients” are for us. Until now. Perkins+Will has been busy making lists of harmful substances, and their side effects, found in commonly used building materials. Just last week, they released a report tackling one such “toxin”: asthmagens, affecting over 23 million Americans (including 7.1. million children). The forward-thinking firm is on the cutting-edge of a movement, instigated by clients and fast taking over the architecture world – towards “healthy” buildings (inside and out). Read more about Perkins+Will’s revolutionary Transparency Project, after the break…

Top 250 U.S. Architectural Firms

Shanghai Tower, currently in progress. Courtesy of Gensler
Shanghai Tower, currently in progress. Courtesy of Gensler

Architectural Record has published their annual list of the “Top 250 Architecture Firms” in the United States. The companies are ranked according to architectural revenue from the prior year. Gensler claimed the number one spot, with a record high of $764 million in revenue, over the long-standing leader AECOM, whom brought in $445 million in 2011. The firms classify themselves by: A = Architect AE = Architect-Engineer AP = Architect Planner EAL = Engineer Architect Landscape AEC = Architect-Engineer-Contractor Continue after the break to review the top 25.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital / Perkins+Will

Photo: Matt Wargo | Courtesy of Perkins+Will
Photo: Matt Wargo | Courtesy of Perkins+Will

The new facility designed by Perkins+Will for the John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland approaches the design as a total experience of healing that includes architecture and urban design.  The project proposes to redefine the hospital experience with The Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center and the Sheikh Zayed Tower, whose goal is to emphasize transformative patient-centric care. More after the break.

Photo: Arch Photo, Inc. (Eduard Hueber) | Courtest of Perkins+Will Photo: Arch Photo, Inc. (Eduard Hueber) | Courtesy of Perkins+Will, OLIN (Garden) and Spencer Finch (Facade) Photo: Arch Photo, Inc. (Eduard Hueber) | Courtesy of Perkins+Will Photo: Arch Photo, Inc. (Eduard Hueber) | Courtesy of Perkins+Will

Perkins+Will and Pringle Brandon Merge

VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Centre by Perkins+Will. © Perkins+Will.
VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Centre by Perkins+Will. © Perkins+Will.

Big news: two architectural heavyweights have joined forces. Pringle Brandon and Pringle Brandon Drew (their more commercial branch) have merged with top-ranking international design firm Perkins+Will. Their joint London and Dubai Offices will know be known as (take a deep breath): Pringle Brandon Perkins+Will. Pringle Brandon (PB) stands to expand its international presence with the merger; Perkins+Will will be able to tap into PB’s strengths in interior design, workplace consultancy, & sustainable practice – as well as their presence in Europe and the UAE, where it has experienced two consecutive years of double-digit growth. Story via Architects Choice and Pringle Brandon‘s Press Release.

AIA Selects the 2012 COTE Top Ten Green Projects

University of Minnesota Duluth – Bagley Classroom Building / Salmela Architect © Paul Crosby
University of Minnesota Duluth – Bagley Classroom Building / Salmela Architect © Paul Crosby

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions. Now in its 16th year, the COTE Top Ten Green Projects program is one of the profession’s best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence. The highlighted projects are the result of a thoroughly integrated approach to architecture, natural systems and technology. They have made a positive contribution to their communities, improved comfort for building occupants and reduced environmental impacts through strategies such as reuse of existing structures, connection to transit systems, low-impact and regenerative site development, energy and water conservation, use of sustainable or renewable construction materials, and design that improves indoor air quality. All the projects will be honored at the AIA 2012 National Convention and Design Exposition, next month in Washington, D.C. Continue after the break to review the top ten green projects.