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The Milkshake Tree / pH+

09:00 - 23 July, 2016
The Milkshake Tree  / pH+, © Paul Raftery
© Paul Raftery

© Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery Courtesy of pH+ +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    United Kingdom, Peninsula Square, London SE10 0ES, UK
  • Area

    35.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Foundry Mews / Project Orange

05:00 - 22 July, 2016
Foundry Mews / Project Orange, © Jack Hobhouse
© Jack Hobhouse

© Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    United Kingdom, Barnes High St, London SW13, UK
  • Area

    800.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

designjunction 2016

14:09 - 18 July, 2016
designjunction 2016, Designjunction 2016, King's Cross, London (September 22 – 25, 2016)
Designjunction 2016, King's Cross, London (September 22 – 25, 2016)

designjunction, now in its sixth year, returns for the annual London Design Festival. Relocating to an exciting new home in King’s Cross, designjunction takes over four main sites for a curated programme of design exhibitions, installations, retail experiences, events and workshops based upon the theme #ImmersedinDesign.

Pea Soup House / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

13:00 - 15 July, 2016
Pea Soup House / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Courtesy of FCB Studios
Courtesy of FCB Studios

Courtesy of FCB Studios Courtesy of FCB Studios © Elizabeth Knuckles Courtesy of FCB Studios +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    London, United Kingdom
  • Project organisers

    RIBA/London Festival of Architecture
  • Structural Engineers

    Expedition Studio
  • Area

    52.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of FCB Studios , Elizabeth Knuckles

Lambeth Marsh House / Fraher Architects

03:00 - 15 July, 2016
Lambeth Marsh House  / Fraher Architects, © Jack Hobhouse
© Jack Hobhouse

© Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse © Jack Hobhouse +26

City of London Building Award 2016 Winners Announced

12:30 - 14 July, 2016
City of London Building Award 2016 Winners Announced, Winner: New Ludgate. Designed by Fletcher Priest Architects and Sauerbruch Hutton. Image
Winner: New Ludgate. Designed by Fletcher Priest Architects and Sauerbruch Hutton. Image

New Ludgate, a retail and commercial development located two blocks east of St. Paul’s Cathedral in downtown London, has been named the City of London Building of the Year 2016. The complex consists of two new buildings, One New Ludgate by Fletcher Priest Architects and Two New Ludgate by Sauerbruch Hutton. The award was given in recognition of “the buildings that support the ambitions of the City of London in delivering a world-class working environment, by evaluating both the quality of the architectural design and the impact the building has had on the city street scene.”

One New Ludgate by Fletcher Priest Architects. Image © Tim Soar Two New Ludgate by Sauerbruch Hutton. Image © Jan Bitter Salters’ Hall by dMFK. Image © Jack Hobhouse  Leathersellers’ Hall by Eric Parry. Image © Dirk Lindner +18

AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects

04:00 - 12 July, 2016
AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects, © Joas Souza
© Joas Souza

On the 29th December, 1940, at the height of the Second World War, an air raid by the Luftwaffe razed a 35-acre site in the heart of the City of London to the ground. The site was known as the Barbican (a Middle English word meaning fortification), so-called for the Roman wall which once stood in the area. Following the war, the City of London Corporation—the municipal governing body for the area—started to explore possibilities to bring this historic site into the twentieth century.

© Joas Souza © Joas Souza Gilbert House piloti. Image © Joas Souza Defoe House. Image © Joas Souza +28

Round-Up: Tall Stories From Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist'

07:30 - 8 July, 2016
Round-Up: Tall Stories From Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist', Courtesy of Monocle
Courtesy of Monocle

A new collection of five minute-long Tall Stories—developed by the team behind The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities—guide the listener through the condensed narratives of a series of architectural projects from around the globe, encompassing their conception, development, use and, in some cases, eventual demise. We've selected eight of our favorites from the ongoing series, ranging from London’s Casson Pavilion to Honolulu's Waikiki Natatorium War Memorial, and the Estadio Centenario stadium in Montevideo.

Drapers Field / Kinnear Landscape Architects

13:00 - 6 July, 2016
Drapers Field / Kinnear Landscape Architects , © Adrian Taylor
© Adrian Taylor

© Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor +11

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

10:30 - 28 June, 2016
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan +34

Serpentine Summer House / Barkow Leibinger

05:00 - 23 June, 2016
Serpentine Summer House  / Barkow Leibinger, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan Model Concept +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    United Kingdom, Kensington Gardens, London W2 2UH, UK
  • Architect in Charge

    Frank Barkow, Regine Leibinger
  • Area

    50.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Hackney New School / Henley Halebrown Rorrison Architects

03:00 - 22 June, 2016
Hackney New School  / Henley Halebrown Rorrison Architects, © David Grandorge
© David Grandorge

© David Grandorge © David Grandorge © David Grandorge © David Grandorge +29

  • Architects

    Henley Halebrown Rorrison, HHbR
  • Location

    Kingsland Rd, London, UK
  • Project Architect

    Noel Cash
  • Area

    5500.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

FORBES MASSIE STUDIO: SEDUCTION OF LIGHT

11:30 - 20 June, 2016
FORBES MASSIE STUDIO: SEDUCTION OF LIGHT, Forbes Massie Studio, Summer Exhibition
Forbes Massie Studio, Summer Exhibition

The exhibition celebrates the imagery of Forbes Massie Studio by presenting a collection of their latest commissions with renowned UK and international architectural practices, on exceptional and high profile projects. Entitled 'Seduction of Light', the collection emphasizes the Studio's approach to image making, focusing particular attention to Composition, Light, Materiality and Atmosphere.

A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision

09:30 - 20 June, 2016
A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision, The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as “Dystopia in the Sky."

For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral.

AD Classics: Palace of Westminster / Charles Barry & Augustus Pugin

04:00 - 20 June, 2016
AD Classics: Palace of Westminster / Charles Barry & Augustus Pugin, The Palace of Westminster as seen from the River Thames. Image Courtesy of Flickr user Alex Brown
The Palace of Westminster as seen from the River Thames. Image Courtesy of Flickr user Alex Brown

At 6:20pm on the evening of October 16, 1834, a fire began in the old Palace of Westminster in London – the foremost seat of parliamentary governance for both the United Kingdom and the British Empire across the seas. The inferno, which burned until the early hours of the morning, destroyed so much of the medieval complex that neither restoration nor preservation were considered viable options – a new palace would have to rise from the ashes to surround the largely undamaged Westminster Hall.[1] The fire gave the United Kingdom a chance not only to replace what was considered as an outdated, patchwork of government buildings, but to erect a Gothic Revival landmark to spiritually embody the pre-eminence of the United Kingdom across the world, and the roots of modern democracy.

Elevation. Image Courtesy of Merrell Publishers Limited Drawing of the 'Estimates' design for the House of Lords by Pugin. ImageCourtesy of Yale University Press The original, unsatisfactory design for the House of Commons. ImageCourtesy of Yale University Press Plan. Image Courtesy of Yale University Press, Ltd. +13

Call for Submissions: LOBBY No.5 – "Faith"

12:00 - 19 June, 2016
Call for Submissions: LOBBY No.5 – "Faith", © LOBBY
© LOBBY

For centuries, faith has been a source of immeasurable blessings as well as uncountable catastrophes. People, no matter how different, have always felt protected under the aegis of a common belief and united to accomplish the unthinkable. But its fruitful potentials are only equal to its destructive dangers. Faith can be the most untameable of fires, and with the promise for righteousness or virtue it can tear families apart, close down borders, promote genocide, foster war.

Gallery: Wolfgang Buttress' Relocated Expo Pavilion, The Hive, Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

06:30 - 19 June, 2016
Gallery: Wolfgang Buttress' Relocated Expo Pavilion, The Hive, Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Wolfgang Buttress’ The Hive, a Gold Medal-winning UK Pavilion originally built for the 2015 Milan Expo, has been relocated to the Kew botanical gardens in central London. The striking (and photogenic) "beehive" was designed by the British practice to provide visitors with a glimpse into the life of a working bee; its 169,300 individual aluminium components—reaching 17-meters tall and fitted with hundreds of LED lights—created a multi-sensory experience that shed light on the importance of the pollinator. Following its relocation, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to this installation and its new home.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +23

Allies and Morrison Propose Alternative to Contested Garden Bridge

16:00 - 15 June, 2016
Allies and Morrison Propose Alternative to Contested Garden Bridge, Courtesy of Allies and Morrison
Courtesy of Allies and Morrison

Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge project has been under fire since plans were announced in 2013, drawing skepticism of the fairness of the competition process, and even being called “nothing but a wasteful blight.” Last month, London's new mayor Sadiq Khan gave a lukewarm endorsement of the project, noting that since £37.7m of the £60m allocated by the government has already been spent, scrapping the project now would end up costing taxpayers more than going forward with it.

The current predicament has inspired architects Allies and Morrison to design an alternative option – one that could both save the taxpayers money and create a new greenway spanning the Thames. Many of the complaints directed toward the original design have been associated with the cost of building a new bridge that would serve limited transportation needs; Allies and Morrison eliminate this issue by simply placing a garden pathway onto an existing piece of infrastructure, the nearby Blackfriars Bridge.