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Understanding Grafton Architects, Directors of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale

04:00 - 18 January, 2017
Understanding Grafton Architects, Directors of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, UTEC / Grafton Architects. Image © Iwan Baan
UTEC / Grafton Architects. Image © Iwan Baan

“When you read Love in the Time of Cholera you come to realize the magic realism of South America.” Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara and I were in a corner of the Barbican Centre’s sprawling, shallow atrium talking about the subject of their most recent accolade, the Royal Institute of British Architects inaugural International Prize, awarded that previous evening. That same night the two Irish architects, who founded their practice in Dublin in the 1970s, also delivered a lecture on the Universidad de Ingeniería and Tecnologia (UTEC)—their “modern-day Machu Picchu” in Lima—to a packed audience in London’s Portland Place.

Farrell and McNamara, who together lead a team of twenty-five as Grafton Architects, are both powerful thinkers, considered conversationalists and unobtrusively groundbreaking designers. For a practice so compact, their international portfolio is exceptionally broad. The first phase of the UTEC in the Peruvian capital, which began following an international competition in 2011, represents the farthest territory the practice have geographically occupied. The project is, in their words, a “man-made cliff” between the Pacific and the mountains – on one side a cascading garden, and on the other a “shoulder” to the city cast from bare concrete.

Herzog & de Meuron's Chelsea FC Stadium Receives Council Approval

14:00 - 12 January, 2017
Herzog & de Meuron's Chelsea FC Stadium Receives Council Approval, © Herzog & de Meuron
© Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron’s Chelsea Football Club stadium has been given approval by Hammersmith and Fulham council’s planning committee, reports BBC. The new £500 million stadium, which is estimated to be completed by 2020, will replace the existing stadium at Stamford Bridge, increasing the capacity of the space by almost 20,000 spectators to 60,000 seats.

The design of the new stadium is inspired by Gothic architecture, as well as nearby Victorian-era brick terraces, which will wrap around the entirety of the building.

Committee decision to approve the stadium plans does not mean that work can begin on site; various other permissions will be necessary before the final decision will be made by London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

© Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron +9

Watch the Tides Change from this Thames River Museum Proposal

12:00 - 11 January, 2017

Architect Evgeny Didorenko has released his conceptual proposal, Thames River Museum, which aims to improve connectivity on the North Bank of the Thames River and create an exciting museum space in London.

The Thames Museum is currently a museum concept without permanent accommodation. Though not officially connected to the Thames Museum, Didorenko’s work suggests a location and design for the project that would not only work with the museum’s context, but that would also solve existing issues on the riverbank.

Therefore, the proposal’s site is an underused portion of London’s North Bank—Queen’s Quay. Historically, Queen’s Quay served as a transportation hub to deliver goods to city residents from the sea, but now lies abandoned, and stays dry during periods of low tide, when water levels drop up to eight meters.

Courtesy of Evgeny Didorenko Courtesy of Evgeny Didorenko Courtesy of Evgeny Didorenko Courtesy of Evgeny Didorenko +10

Open Call: Hyde Park Library I London

09:26 - 11 January, 2017
Open Call: Hyde Park Library I London

London - literature's labyrinth of 'lost souls' is one of the favorite settings for writers/poets/scientists/thinkers and intelligentsia, who have nurtured the city into the greatest hub of intellectual revolution. One of the greatest living cities of the planet, London has had the biggest global influence on the socio-economic and cultural landscape of the world. 

Gallery House / Neil Dusheiko Architects

09:00 - 10 January, 2017
Gallery House / Neil Dusheiko Architects, © Agnese Sanvito
© Agnese Sanvito

© Agnese Sanvito © Agnese Sanvito © Tim Crocker              © Tim Crocker              +37

Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London

12:00 - 5 January, 2017
Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London, © Tate Harmer
© Tate Harmer

London-based firm Tate Harmer has won a competition to design a new £6 million ($7.4 million USD) museum for The Scout Association (TSA) at the group’s headquarters in Chingford, east London. Their proposal takes the form of a big, colorful tent that will tell the story of the Scouting movement within a fun, environmentally conscious structure.

© Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer +10

Wolfgang Buttress’ UK Expo Pavilion, "The Hive," Wins 2016 Landscape Institute Award

16:00 - 26 December, 2016
Wolfgang Buttress’ UK Expo Pavilion, "The Hive," Wins 2016 Landscape Institute Award, © Nick Caville BDP. Courtesy of the Landscape Institute
© Nick Caville BDP. Courtesy of the Landscape Institute

BDP and Wolfgang Buttress’ pavilion, The Hive, has been awarded the 2016 Landscape Institute Award for Best Design for a Temporary Landscape as part of their 2016 awards program.

Judges for the award noted the project’s ability to interact with its site, remarking that they were ‘impressed by the quality and simplicity of the design and execution, in particular the way in which the design works with a sensitive landscape to provide a beautiful and functional temporary setting for the installation, and a longer-term facility for events and education.”

Learn the Story Behind Alison & Peter Smithson's Brutalist Icon, Economist Plaza

14:00 - 23 December, 2016

In 2017, British news magazine The Economist will move to a new home, leaving behind its iconic home of 52 years, Economist Plaza.

The project represents the first major commission by British duo Alison and Peter Smithson, who would go on to have esteemed careers as champions of the Brutalist style. Located at 22 Ryder Street, not far from Hyde Park and Buckingham Palace, Economist Plaza marked a significant breakthrough in tall building design, replacing the traditional streetfront of a podium and tower design with stairs and a ramp leading to an elevated plaza from which 3 buildings would rise.

Watch the video above to learn the story behind the project, and read more about the legacy the Economist will leave behind, here.

Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects

11:00 - 20 December, 2016
 Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects, © Tim Crocker
© Tim Crocker

© Tim Crocker              © Tim Crocker              © Tim Crocker              © Tim Crocker              +23

The Zig Zag Building / Lynch Architects

05:00 - 19 December, 2016
The Zig Zag Building / Lynch Architects, © Hufton and Crow
© Hufton and Crow

© David Grandorge © David Grandorge © Tim Soar © Sue Barr +81

Experience the Sir John Soane's Museum, Virtually

04:00 - 18 December, 2016
Experience the Sir John Soane's Museum, Virtually, Temple of Vesta in Plaster of Paris model by François Fouquet. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum
Temple of Vesta in Plaster of Paris model by François Fouquet. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum

The Sir John Soane’s Museum is often cited as a seminal inspiration for architects of all generations. Located in London's Lincoln's Inn Fields, the house—designed by Soane (born in 1753), architect of the Bank of England—is a remarkable biographical bricolage of unique spaces, objects and ideas. Kept exactly as it was at the time of Soane's death in 1837, the museum is packed with paintings, sculpture, furniture and drawings – all curated and composed by the architect himself to "enhance their poetic qualities."

Soane’s ingenious design for the courts in Westminster. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum Temple of Vesta in Plaster of Paris model by François Fouquet. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum Pompeii in 1820 showing partial excavation. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum Temple of Vesta modelled in cork by Giovanni Altieri. Image © Sir John Soane's Museum +8

Director of London's Architectural Association, Brett Steele, to Become UCLA Dean

05:30 - 15 December, 2016
Director of London's Architectural Association, Brett Steele, to Become UCLA Dean, The Architectural Association on Bedford Square, London
The Architectural Association on Bedford Square, London

Brett Steele, Director of London's Architectural Association (AA) since 2005, has announced that he will become Dean of UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture in August 2017. Although American-born, Steele has since become a naturalized British citizen. He studied at the AA, the University of Oregon, and the San Francisco Art Institute respectively, before working as a Project Architect at Zaha Hadid Architects in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

RIBA to Present Seminal Show on Mies van der Rohe's Unrealized "Mansion House Tower"

04:00 - 13 December, 2016
RIBA to Present Seminal Show on Mies van der Rohe's Unrealized "Mansion House Tower", Proposed Mies van der Rohe-designed tower block for the Mansion House Square scheme. Image © John Donat / RIBA Collections
Proposed Mies van der Rohe-designed tower block for the Mansion House Square scheme. Image © John Donat / RIBA Collections

Next year the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) will open a seminal new exhibition: Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square. The show will examine two iconic schemes proposed for the same site in the City of London: Mies van der Rohe’s unrealised Mansion House Square project (developed by Lord Peter Palumbo) and its built successor, James Stirling Michael Wilford & Associates’ No.1 Poultry.

Leo Villareal + Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands Wins London's Illuminated River Competition

12:15 - 12 December, 2016
Leo Villareal + Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands Wins London's Illuminated River Competition, Current / Leo Villareal with Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands and Future\Pace. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and Leo Villareal and Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands
Current / Leo Villareal with Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands and Future\Pace. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and Leo Villareal and Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

The team led by light artist Leo Villareal and architects and urban planners Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands has been announced as the winner of the Illuminated River International Design Competition.

Selected from a six-strong shortlist of internationally acclaimed architects and designers, the winning design was lauded by Illuminated River Foundation Chair Hannah Rothschild as “beautiful, ambitious and realisable but always considerate to the environment, lighting levels and energy conservation.”

Mathematics: The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects

05:00 - 11 December, 2016
Mathematics: The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects, © Luke Hayes
© Luke Hayes

© Luke Hayes © Luke Hayes © Luke Hayes © Luke Hayes +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Kensington, London SW7, United Kingdom
  • Architects in Charge

    Zaha Hadid, Patrik Schumacher
  • Project Director

    Charles Walker
  • Area

    913.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

A Look at London's New Design Museum Through the Lens of Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia

09:30 - 10 December, 2016
A Look at London's New Design Museum Through the Lens of Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia, © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia
© Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia

With the opening of the new Design Museum in London, the former Commonwealth Institute building designed by RMJM in 1962 has been given a new lease of life. With an exterior renovation by OMA and Allies & Morrison, and interiors by John Pawson, last month the building reopened after a fourteen-year closure—finally offering the public a chance to experience the swooping paraboloid roof from the inside. Read on to see photographs of the Design Museum's new home by Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia.

© Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia +38

Sunken Bath Project / Studio 304 Architecture

05:00 - 9 December, 2016
Sunken Bath Project / Studio 304 Architecture, © Radu Palicica Photography
© Radu Palicica Photography

© Radu Palicica Photography © Radu Palicica Photography © Radu Palicica Photography © Radu Palicica Photography +14

London's Aylesbury Estate: A Housing Project Then and Now

04:00 - 9 December, 2016

Originally built to house over 7,000 people in the 1970s, the Aylesbury Estate in South East London was once one of largest housing projects in Europe. In recent years it has "fallen into rapid decline" and, according to British filmmaker Joe Gilbert, "perfectly encapsulates the growing housing crisis and problems caused by gentrification." With narration by Tom Dyckhoff, this short film aims to capture the reality of a housing utopia which has de-evolved into an uncomfortable reality.