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ArchDaily & Strelka Award: Vote Now to Decide the Winners

18:50 - 18 July, 2019
ArchDaily & Strelka Award: Vote Now to Decide the Winners

ArchDaily, Strelka Institute, and Strelka KB have selected a long list of 50 architectural projects nominated for the joint ArchDaily & Strelka Award, which celebrates emerging architects and new ideas that transform the contemporary city. Now the readers of ArchDaily and Strelka Mag can vote for their favorite project to decide the finalists.

Architect Transforms a Copenhagen Railway Depot into a Colorful Playground

07:00 - 6 June, 2019
Architect Transforms a Copenhagen Railway Depot into a Colorful Playground, © Illya Rastvorov
© Illya Rastvorov

The 2019 CANactions International Architecture Festival focused on an exploration of a notion of "Hromada" — Ukrainian name for the 'community', which is embedded into the country's historic and cultural codes and reflected in contemporary social movements and architectural forms.

33BY Designs Babi Yar Memorial for Ukraine

05:00 - 6 June, 2019
33BY Designs Babi Yar Memorial for Ukraine, Courtesy of 33BY
Courtesy of 33BY

Ukraine-based 33BY Architecture has designed a Babi Yar memorial and information center for the city of Kiev. The concept of the project is designed to remind people about the tragedy at Babi Yar from 1941-1943. The info center was made to be a Holocaust memorial that could be moved and reinstalled in different locations. The project aims to convey the tragedy of events and create a space for contemplation and remembrance.

Celebrate Ukraine's Soviet Brutalist Architecture with this New Short Film

08:00 - 24 July, 2018
Celebrate Ukraine's Soviet Brutalist Architecture with this New Short Film, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/shiborisan/25966454071'>hélène veilleux [Flickr]</a>, under the license <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
© hélène veilleux [Flickr], under the license CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The fall of the Iron Curtain in 1991 came not only with political, economic, and social implications but also left behind a distinctive style of architecture. This architecture, under the Soviet regime, was a system which relied on quantifiable targets, such as the Five Year Plan. These quotas forced architects to evaluate building projects in terms of material and labor costs, number of units, volume of skilled and unskilled labor, and so forth. As a result, architecture across these regions became an industrial commodity, an outward flex of power and technological innovation, and a collective of architects executing a Stalinist vision.

This Crowdsourced and Crowdfunded Pavilion in Ukraine Embodies the Collaborative Spirit

04:00 - 30 June, 2018
This Crowdsourced and Crowdfunded Pavilion in Ukraine Embodies the Collaborative Spirit, © Alexandr Burlaka
© Alexandr Burlaka

In Dnipro, Ukraine, sits a unique multi-purpose pavilion rich with historical roots and design influence. Stage is a collaborative project between architects from Ukraine, Poland, Denmark and Italy, crowdsourced and crowdfunded by the citizens of Dnipro. The site for the pavilion has been centered around community involvement throughout the complex history of Dnipro, but it has laid unused for over 70 years.

The Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and Future

14:30 - 30 April, 2018
The Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and Future, Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/oinkylicious/2329332355/in/photolist-4xQrmF-Zy21ao-Kk1D9g-Gb2HP2-Gbd54x-JowQgL-Gbd2dH-kmncdm-HhH4ar-vjHaG4-UEr5H6-a18skw-4Jfgyq-a15xDt-b8aKqR-79Cs8L-7f8k5o-6mTumV-AchudK-nMskBH-21Paa6J-YtFY7A-Zym38a-GqNxX-Zu4Rj7-Zvy49y-o4Cvtz-GvJskr-Zvy4ZV-a18r3j-nMrmxp-22mw4E4-a18sfj-9pfhyd-a18srJ-6mTu12-8AFucS-6mTu6v-6mXBWu-a18q1b-6mXBNJ-a18rMf-a15AuP-a15Aor-aR4JPT-CJcGwg-d7Z5uq-GqPr6-GqKb1-a15B3P'>Flickr user oinkylicious</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image© Flickr user oinkylicious licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

April 26th saw the 32nd anniversary of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, with the explosion of the Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine causing the direct deaths of 31 people, the spreading of radioactive clouds across Europe, and the effective decommissioning of 19 miles of land in all directions from the plant. Thirty-two years later, a dual reading of the landscape is formed: one of engineering extremes, and one of eeriness and desolation.

Archimatika Architects Unveils Lively Plans for New Ukrainian Housing Project

14:00 - 16 October, 2016
Archimatika Architects Unveils Lively Plans for New Ukrainian Housing Project, Courtesy of Archimatika Architects
Courtesy of Archimatika Architects

Archimatika Architects has unveiled the plans for “Leopol Town,” a new housing project located on Styiska Street in Lviv, Western Ukraine. Overall, the project will include seven buildings, with 757 flats, shops, cafeterias, restaurants, and public access at the lower levels.

Nature-Inspired Design Named Winner of Sylvan Theatre Competition

16:00 - 1 October, 2016
Nature-Inspired Design Named Winner of Sylvan Theatre Competition , Courtesy of Eric Rodrigues
Courtesy of Eric Rodrigues

The Fallen Leaf, designed by Eric Rodrigues, has been named the first-place winner of the competition for the new Sylvan open air theatre in Cherkasy City Park, Ukraine. With a plan to demolish the old building, the new theatre is inspired by nature: it integrates into the landscape of the Cherkasy municipal park and uses only natural and locally sourced stone and wood. The form of the glue laminated timber roof is that of a falling leaf, whose organic slope helps to enhance the theatre's acoustics.

Should the Ukrainian Capital "Erase its Soviet Past or Learn to Live With History?"

04:00 - 17 November, 2015
Should the Ukrainian Capital "Erase its Soviet Past or Learn to Live With History?", The Friendship of Nations Arch, Kyiv/Kiev. Image © Ryan Koopmans
The Friendship of Nations Arch, Kyiv/Kiev. Image © Ryan Koopmans

In a 'long view' piece for The Calvert Journal, Owen Hatherley tackles one of the most pressing cultural questions facing many former Soviet countries: should the Ukrainian capital of Kiev (or Kyiv) erase its Soviet past or learn to live with history? For a city which saw a popular revolution against "a grotesquely wealthy elite" last year, Kiev is developing a flourishing independent cultural scene. In this article Hatherley, who has taken part in the city's 2015 art biennial, expertly narrates the city's Soviet, post-Soviet and contemporary "oligarch-funded" architecture to ask: "if Soviet Ukraine can’t be wished away, what should be conserved, and what should be rejected?"

"Superstructure": 11 Projects That Defined Kiev's Soviet Modernism

10:30 - 29 March, 2015
"Superstructure": 11 Projects That Defined Kiev's Soviet Modernism, Pavilion "Transport", from the Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy of USSR. Image Courtesy of Valentyn Shtolko
Pavilion "Transport", from the Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy of USSR. Image Courtesy of Valentyn Shtolko

Around the globe, the post-war years were a period of optimism and extreme experimentation. On both sides of the cold war's ideological divide, this optimism found its greatest expression, architecturally speaking, in modernism - but of course, the particular circumstances of each city offered a unique spin on the modernist project. According to the curators of "Superstructure," an exhibition presented at Kiev's Visual Culture Research Center from January 28th to February 28th, the utopian architectural works of Kiev represented "an attempt to transform the city into the environment for materialization of artistic thinking – in contrast to the strict unification of city space by typical construction and residential blocks." Architects such as Edward Bilsky and Florian Yuriyev, often working in collaboration with artists such as Ada Rybachuk and Volodymyr Melnychenko attempted to create projects that were a complete synthesis of architecture and art - an approach to design that often didn't sit well with the Ukrainian authorities of the time.

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