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World War Ii: The Latest Architecture and News

Dorte Mandrup Wins Competition to Construct Heritage Center Atop a WWII Bunker 

06:00 - 14 February, 2018
© Mir
© Mir

Danish firm Dorte Mandrup A/S has been announced as the winners of a competition to design the new Trilateral Wadden Sea World Heritage Partnership Center on a historic UNESCO naval site in Wilhelmshaven, Germany. Selected from 14 entries, the firm’s winning proposal will seemingly float atop an existing World War II bunker and house the offices of a joint Danish, German and Netherlandish corporation working to protect the Wadden Sea area.

Exhibition: "The Evidence Room" at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto

18:14 - 14 August, 2017
Exhibition: "The Evidence Room" at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Interior perspective of The Evidence Room with models of Auschwitz gas column and gas-tight hatch, plaster casts, and model of gas-tight door.   Photo by Fred Hunsberger, University of Waterloo School of Architecture.
Interior perspective of The Evidence Room with models of Auschwitz gas column and gas-tight hatch, plaster casts, and model of gas-tight door. Photo by Fred Hunsberger, University of Waterloo School of Architecture.

Widely acclaimed as a critically important work on its debut at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition of the 2016 Venice Biennale, The Evidence Room examines the chilling role architecture played in constructing the Auschwitz death camp.

AD Classics: Gallaratese Quarter / Aldo Rossi & Carlo Aymonino

11:15 - 14 March, 2017
AD Classics: Gallaratese Quarter / Aldo Rossi & Carlo Aymonino, © Gili Merin
© Gili Merin

As the dust settled following the Second World War much of Europe was left with a crippling shortage of housing. In Milan, a series of plans were drafted in response to the crisis, laying out satellite communities for the northern Italian city which would each house between 50,000 to 130,000 people. Construction the first of these communities began in 1946, one year after the end of the conflict; ten years later in 1956, the adoption of Il Piano Regolatore Generale—a new master plan—set the stage for the development of the second, known as 'Gallaratese'. The site of the new community was split into parts 1 and 2, the latter of which was owned by the Monte Amiata Società Mineraria per Azioni. When the plan allowed for private development of Gallaratese 2 in late 1967, the commission for the project was given to Studio Ayde and, in particular, its partner Carlo Aymonino. Two months later Aymonino would invite Aldo Rossi to design a building for the complex and the two Italians set about realizing their respective visions for the ideal microcosmic community.[1]

© Gili Merin © Gili Merin © Gili Merin © Gili Merin + 17

AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux

04:00 - 11 December, 2016
AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux, Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0

With the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s, the great World’s Fairs that had been held around the globe since the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 lost much of their momentum. With the specter of another global conflict looming like a stormcloud on the horizon in the latter half of the decade, prospects for the future only grew darker. It was in this air of uncertainty and fear that the gleaming white Trylon and Perisphere of the 1939 New York World’s Fair made their debuts, the centerpiece of an exhibition that presented a vision of hope for things to come.

Image via MetMuseum.org (Public Domain) A quarter section of the Perisphere reveals its steel skeletal structure. ImageImage via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) Image via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) The Helicline connected the Trylon and Perisphere and allowed visitors to make their way back to the ground from six stories up + 8

This 3-Mile-Long Nazi Resort is Being Resurrected as a Luxury Getaway

09:30 - 28 September, 2016
This 3-Mile-Long Nazi Resort is Being Resurrected as a Luxury Getaway, © Metropole Marketing
© Metropole Marketing

This article was originally published on Business Insider as "Hitler's 3-mile-long abandoned Nazi resort is transforming into a luxury getaway."

Three years before Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler ordered the construction of the world's largest tourist resort, located on a beachfront property on the island of Rügen. The Nazis called it Prora.

Capable of holding more than 20,000 residents at a single time, Prora was meant to comfort the weary German worker who toiled away in a factory without respite. According to historian and tour guide Roger Moorhouse, it was also meant to serve as the carrot to the stick of the Gestapo—a pacifying gesture to get the German people on Hitler's side.

But then World War II began, and Prora's construction stalled—until now.

© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/99667320@N06/13352750454/in/photolist-mkWkvq-mkXX9i-mmvq8W-mroohW-n29cTK-mpjJy7-n34o2d-mFZRB2-mxKSBy-n5eudF-n6tHtc-n6WRZ8-mTV4ZX-n7vgVk-mZq98P-mZqATk-n1gupw-mKEMe8-mKEHmX-mD8Gyd-mKE7NF-mWhv2M-j5WdR9-iH8HG7-j56D8z-iNwCzr-iKUXXP-iH4kaF-iM7Lwn-iLW3sS-j5TGBr-iNySQW-mVPruk-mxH7yP-iP1Qaz-j95ec5-j92BrT-j889S2-jb3G5A-jb2rMZ-naEwMZ-naEfKP-n1fXS9-mZPP8M-mZPtJ6-mXGxAj-mWidK4-mHUpwd-mG1Kir-mFZADX'>Flickr user Pixelteufel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flur_Zerstoerungen.JPG'>Wikimedia user Wusel007</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>. Image5 © Metropole Marketing © Metropole Marketing + 17

2016 Venice Biennale Exhibition to Examine the 2000 Irving Trial and the Architecture of the Holocaust

06:00 - 22 February, 2016
2016 Venice Biennale Exhibition to Examine the 2000 Irving Trial and the Architecture of the Holocaust, Back Sectional Elevation of The Evidence Room (Siobhan Allman, Anna Longrigg, Donald McKay, Michael Nugent, Nicole Ratajczak, Alexandru Vilcu). Image © The Evidence Room
Back Sectional Elevation of The Evidence Room (Siobhan Allman, Anna Longrigg, Donald McKay, Michael Nugent, Nicole Ratajczak, Alexandru Vilcu). Image © The Evidence Room

In 2000, in a trial held in London, the notorious British Holocaust denier David Irving sued an American historian and her publisher for libel. He posited that the Holocaust didn't really happen – "was the planned and systematic murder of six million European Jews an elaborate hoax?" The battle over the meaning of the architectural evidence took centre stage. Ultimately, forensic interpretation of the blueprints and architectural remains of Auschwitz became crucial in the defeat of Irving, in what remains to date the most decisive victory against Holocaust denial.

The Evidence Room Isometric (Siobhan Allman, Anna Longrigg, Donald McKay, Michael Nugent, Nicole Ratajczak, Alexandru Vilcu). Image © The Evidence Room Plaster Cast of Gas Hatch from Auschwitz Gas Chamber, Copied From Photo by Omer Arbel. Image © Omer Arbel Interior Perspective of Auschwitz Gas Column in The Evidence Room (Siobhan Allman, Anna Longrigg, Donald McKay, Michael Nugent, Nicole Ratajczak, Alexandru Vilcu). Image © The Evidence Room Interior Perspective of Gas Chamber Door in The Evidence Room (Siobhan Allman, Anna Longrigg, Donald McKay, Michael Nugent, Nicole Ratajczak, Alexandru Vilcu). Image © The Evidence Room + 14