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Beacons of Pride: #LoveWins in These Illuminated Buildings

San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com
San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com

Earlier today, the US Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage should be legal in all 50 states, effectively overruling 14 states that so far have continued to enforce a ban (if you've been on Facebook in the last few hours, you've probably already heard). The ruling comes just in time for Pride Parades which will take place this weekend in many cities, and to celebrate this historic decision, we've rounded up some iconic buildings lit up for past Pride Parades for everybody to enjoy - equally.

2015 European Summer Exhibition Guide

Exhibitions, much like publications and films, are one of the key contemporary methods for the communication of architectural concepts and ideas. They allow the practice, curator or educative body to edit and present information and visuals in a way which narrates a story, provokes new ideas, or feeds into a wider discourse. For many, exhibitions are an invaluable source of inspiration and an engaging way of gaining new, or reaffirming old, knowledge and design precedents. Intimately linked to the space or place in which they are displayed, the best exhibitions also remind us that the practice of architecture is both a profession and a discipline; a valuable way of understanding the built, and unbuilt, world we live in.

If you're traveling to, living or studying in Europe this summer then dive into our compilation of what we consider to be some of the most informative and exciting exhibitions on show in between June and October 2015. If you visit them, or any other exhibitions that you enjoy, share a photograph on Instagram or Twitter with the hashtag #archdailyexhibitions.

Check out our favourite exhibitions on architecture, urbanism and design, from Jyväskylä to Milano, after the break. 

Architecture: Concept and Notation at SAM The Brutalist Playground, London. Image © Assemble & Simon Terrill UK Pavilion / Wolfgang Buttress. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu 'Africa' at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Image © Kere Dano

The Rise Of Private Art Galleries

In an article for The New Yorker, Ben Mauk examines the rise of the private art 'museum.' In the centre of Berlin there sits a "heavy, grey, and shrapnel-pocked" bunker, designed by Nazi architect Karl Bonatz under the direction of Albert Speer which, in 2003, was transformed into a private gallery. Having been bought by Christian and Karen Boros in order to display a portion of their sizeable collection of contemporary art, the only way for a member of the public to gain admittance is by registering online for a group tour. For Mauk, however, this is not necessarily a bad thing. Read the article in full here.

10 Highlights from Guardian Cities' "History of Cities in 50 Buildings"

All good things must come to an end, and Guardian Cities' excellent "History of Cities in 50 Buildings" series is sadly no exception, with only a few more left to be published before they hit 50. The whole series is definitely worth the read, bringing in the best of academic and architectural writing from guest authors and the Guardian's own Cities team, but if you're strapped for time - and if you're an architect, it's fairly likely that's true - we've rounded up 10 highlights from the list to get you started.

Amazonas Theatre, Manaus. Image © Wikimedia user Leaderfo Narkomfin Building, Moscow. Image © Wikimedia user NVO Ponte Tower, Johannesburg. Image © Flickr user fiverlocker Byker Wall Estate, Newcastle. Image © Flickr user George Rex

Incredible Color Video Shows Life in Berlin at the End of WWII

May 8th marks the 70-year anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe, when Germany’s Third Reich surrendered to the Allied forces. To commemorate the anniversary, Konstantin von zur Muehlen has released “Spirit of Berlin,” a short color film with historic footage showing everyday life in the German capital in July 1945 -- just two months after the end of the war. 

Learn more after the break. 

What’s Behind Europe’s Grandiose Rebuilding?

Is there a growing nostalgia pervading attitudes to civic architecture in Europe? From Berlin's new Royal Palace on the River Spree to Turkey's rekindled fascination with their Ottoman heritage, architecture is becoming the medium of choice for exploring a city's roots and a people's past. In this post originally published by TheLong+Short, Feargus O'Sullivan investigates how many governments and developers have decided that the way to future lies in looking backwards.

Reading about Dubai’s Burj Khalifa in the German press, you’d be forgiven for thinking the building was in Leipzig, not the Middle East. “The tallest building in the world is so German,” said Der Spiegel when the tower opened in 2010. “The Burj Khalifa is an Ossi!" shouted Bild, using the common nickname for East Germans. The headlines were partly right: when East Germany’s old parliament building, the Palace of the Republic in Berlin, was demolished in 2006, several thousand tonnes of steel girders were stripped from its carcass and shipped to the Gulf for use in the construction of Burj Khalifa. 

Photographer’s Loft / Bruzkus Batek Architekten

  • Architects: Bruzkus Batek Architekten
  • Location: Berlin, Germany
  • Design Team: Ester Bruzkus, Ulrike Wattenbach
  • Area: 165.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Bruzkus Batek Architekten

Courtesy of Bruzkus Batek Architekten Courtesy of Bruzkus Batek Architekten Courtesy of Bruzkus Batek Architekten Courtesy of Bruzkus Batek Architekten

Urban Treehouse / baumraum

  • Architects: baumraum
  • Location: Zehlendorf, Berlin, Germany
  • Area: 34.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Laura Fiorio

© Laura Fiorio © Laura Fiorio © Laura Fiorio © Laura Fiorio

Review: 'All Of This Belongs To You' - Civic Urbanism At London's Victoria & Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), named after the Queen and Her Consort, has its foundations in the Great Exhibition of 1851 amidst the wealth, innovation and squalor of the Industrial Revolution. Britain was flooded by prosperity which allowed for the development of major new institutions to collect and exhibit objects of cultural significance or artistic value. The institute’s first director, Henry Cole, declared that it should be “a schoolroom for everyone,” and a democratic approach to its relationship with public life has remained the cornerstone of the V&A. Not only has it always been free of charge but it was also the first to open late hours (made possible by gas lighting), allowing a more comprehensive demographic of visitor.

Their latest exhibition, which opens today, seeks to realign the museum’s vast collection and palatial exhibition spaces in South Kensington with these founding concepts. The interventions of All of This Belongs to You attempt to push the V&A’s position as an extension of London’s civic and cultural built environment to the fore, testing the museum’s ability to act as a 21st century public institution. To do this in London, a city where the notion of public and private is increasingly blurred, has resulted in a sequence of compelling installations which are tied together through their relevance either in subject matter, technique, or topicality.

The Ethics of Dust: Trajan’s Column by Jorge Oteros-Pailos. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum ‘AgBags’ installed on the V&A’s stone façade as part of a work by Natalie Jermijenko. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum Spike studs by Kent Stainless Ltd. that are intended 
to discourage people from sitting or sleeping 
in various spaces in the city. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum MacBook Air casing and components from a computer used by journalists to write editorial about the data leaked to The Guardian newspaper by Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor. Image © The Guardian/ Victoria & Albert Museum

Reinier de Graaf on Cultural Amnesia and the "Fall" of the Berlin Wall

"Twenty-five years after the Berlin Wall’s demise, it is as though a large part of the twentieth century never happened," writes OMA principle Reinier de Graaf in his article for Metropolis Magazine "The Other Truth". "An entire period has been erased from public consciousness, almost like a blank frame in a film." Through the course of the article, de Graaf outlines how the West has rewritten the history of the cold war, erasing the "other truth" that existed for nearly half a century in East Berlin, the USSR, and other soviet-aligned states - a truth that we forget to our peril. It may not be immediately architectural, but the essay provides an interesting look into the political thoughts of de Graaf who, as the principle of one of architecture's most prominent research organizations in AMO, has an important influence on the profession's understanding of the wider world. Read the article in full here.

Explore Alexander Brodsky's Architectural Fantasy at Berlin's Tchoban Foundation

From March 13, Berlin's Tchoban Foundation Museum for Architectural Drawing will showcase the work of acclaimed Russian artist and architect Alexander Brodsky in the eponymous exhibition "Alexander Brodsky. Works." 

Curated by Daria Paramonova, architect and co-curator of the Russian Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale, the exhibition will feature a collection of Brodsky's new and old work and run until June 5.

Learn more about the exhibition and view selected works on display after the break.

"Architect", Alexander Brodsky (1984). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation. Museum for Architectural Drawing "Untitled", Alexander Brodsky (1993). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation. Museum for Architectural Drawing "Untitled", Alexander Brodsky (2014). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation. Museum for Architectural Drawing "Vanishing Points", Alexander Brodsky (1997). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation. Museum for Architectural Drawing

Bazar Noir / Hidden Fortress

  • Architects: Hidden Fortress
  • Location: Kreuzbergstraße 78, 10965 Berlin, Germany
  • Area: 85.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Hidden Fortress

Courtesy of Hidden Fortress Courtesy of Hidden Fortress Courtesy of Hidden Fortress Courtesy of Hidden Fortress

R50 – Cohousing / ifau und Jesko Fezer + HEIDE & VON BECKERATH

  • Architects: ifau und Jesko Fezer, HEIDE & VON BECKERATH
  • Location: Ritterstraße 50, 10969 Berlin, Germany
  • Architect In Charge: Verena von Beckerath, Jesko Fezer, Tim Heide, Christoph Heinemann, Susanne Heiss, Christoph Schmidt
  • Area: 2037.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Andrew Alberts

© Andrew Alberts © Andrew Alberts © Andrew Alberts © Andrew Alberts

Video: ZAO/standardarchitecture's Zhang Ke on "Contemplating Basics"

In conjunction with "Contemplating Basics," the 35th Aedes Architecture Forum's exhibition of work by Beijing-based ZAO/standardarchitecture, Reframe presents an interview the firm's founder, Zhang Ke, and Dr Eduard Kögel, an Urban Planner and critic from Berlin.

Gleisdreieck Park / Atelier LOIDL

In the heart of Kreuzberg, Berlin’s new, big inner-city park is opening this summer:  The “Park am Gleisdreieck”, a former triangular junction. The first half of an altogether 36 hectares area spanning in the Western part of Berlin was already opened in September 2011 („Gleisdreieck - Eastpark“).

A space: Lofts in Berlin Mitte / plajer & franz studio

  • Architects: plajer & franz studio
  • Location: Kremmener Straße 9, 10435 Berlin, Germany
  • Project Manager: Sophie Gatzke
  • Area: 400.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Christian Rudat

© Christian Rudat © Christian Rudat © Christian Rudat © Christian Rudat