A space: Lofts in Berlin Mitte / plajer & franz studio

© Christian Rudat

Architects: plajer & franz studio
Location: Kremmener Straße 9, 10435 ,
Project Manager: Sophie Gatzke
Area: 400.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Christian Rudat

Coop Housing at River Spreefeld / Carpaneto Architekten + Fatkoehl Architekten + BARarchitekten

© Ute Zscharnt

Architects: , Fatkoehl Architekten, BARarchitekten
Location: Berlin, Germany
Collaborators: Die Zusammenarbeiter, Christian Schöning, Angelika Drescher
Area: 7400.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Ute Zscharnt, Daka, Michael Matuschka, Andreas Trogisch, Eric Tschernow, Johannes Dumpe

Audi Urban Future Award 2014: Team Berlin’s “Flywheel” Could Revolutionize Personal Mobility

© Audi Urban Future Initiative

One of three runners-up in the 2014 Audi Urban Future Award, the Berlin Team of Max Schwitalla, Paul Friedli and Arndt Pechstein proposed a futuristic and innovative concept for an entirely new type of personal transport. Drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as elevator technology and biomimicry, their designs offer a thought-provoking alternative to our existing systems that could revolutionize the city as we know it.

Though their proposal ultimately lost out to Jose Castillo’s Team Mexico City, the work of the team correlates closely with the aims of Audi’s Urban Future Initiative, offering a compromise between the convenience and status of personal transport and the civic benefits of public transport. Read on to find out how this was achieved.

Fellows Pavilion – American Academy Berlin / Barkow Leibinger

© Stefan Müller

Architects: Barkow Leibinger
Location: ,
Project Architect: Tobias Wenz
Area: 85.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Stefan Müller, Simon Menges

“Fragments of Metropolis”: An Exploration of Berlin’s Expressionist History

© Niels Lehmann & Christoph Rauhut

Despite being born in the same era, embodies an entirely different architectural sensibility to other proto-modernist movements like the Bauhaus. Its complex forms marked the creation of what we know as the modern metropolis and became one of the iconic architectural styles of the Roaring Twenties. Throughout Europe, over 1,000 expressionist buildings remain standing, yet many are forgotten and not properly preserved.

For the past four years, Niels Lehmann and Christoph Rauhut have been working to document these surviving expressionist landmarks, following their previous book “Modernism London Style.” Their new book, “Fragments of Metropolis – ” presents 135 remaining expressionist buildings in and the surrounding area, and with your help this incredible collection documenting the landmarks of expressionism will be published, with colorful photography and detailed maps revealing their exact locations. Follow this link to become a supporter and learn more, or continue after the break to see a selection of images from the book.

Chipperfield On London’s “Success-Based Culture”

Neues Museum, Berlin (courtesy Staatliche Museen zu Berlin). Image © Achim Kleuker

Speaking to The Guardian, David Chipperfield has stated that he regards the hold of private investment over new architecture in London as an ”absolutely terrible” means of building a city. He argues that Berlin – where he spends considerable amounts of time and runs a large office – “is a much more reflective society than ours” because the has sunk into ”a success-based culture.”

[In Berlin] there is still an idea of the public realm. We have given that up in London. We have declared the public realm dead; the question is how to get stuff out of the private sector. We are unbelievably sophisticated at that.

Infographic: The Bauhaus Movement and the School that Started it All

Courtesy of Aram

Bauhaus, the school of design established by Walter Gropius in Weimar in 1919, has arguably been the most influential of any institution in shaping the trajectory of modern architecture. Out of this single school came an entire movement that would have lasting effects on architectural pedagogy and the design of everything from buildings to road signs. Born out of a larger cultural movement following Germany’s defeat in World War I which left the country ripe for regrowth without the previous constraints imposed by censorship, the core of philosophy were the principles of craftsmanship and mass production, which allowed for the movement’s rapid proliferation and a production model that would later inform contemporary design companies such as Ikea. Check out the infographic from Aram below to learn more about the movement, tracking the school from its origins in Weimar, via its canonical Gropius-designed home in Dessau, to its continuing legacy today.

8,000 Illuminated Balloons to Mark 9-Mile Stretch of Berlin Wall

Lichtgrenze (rendering) via the Chicago Tribune

25 years ago on November 9, East German protesters torn down the Berlin Wall. To commemorate this moment, the German capital plans to line the wall’s original 9-mile stretch with 8,000 illuminated, white balloons. The , named lichtgrenze or “light frontier,” will be open November 7. On the 9th, the balloons will be simultaneously released into the air to music provided by the Staatskapelle orchestra.

‘People’s Palaces’: Behind The Scenes at Mecanoo’s Upcoming Exhibition in Berlin

YouTube Preview Image

Mecanoo have shared with us a behind the scenes look at their upcoming at Berlin’s Aedes Architecture Forum, entitled People’s Palaces. Presenting some of the Dutch practice’s recent public buildings, such as the 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize nominated Library of Birmingham and the Maritime and Beachcombers Museum in Texel, the Netherlands, the timing of the exhibition also celebrates the company’s 30th anniversary. Founded in 1984, continues to develop a strong reputation for libraries, as well as cultural spaces and performance venues. This exhibition specifically traces the impact of ’s public buildings on local communities.

Daniel Libeskind Reflects On Designing Buildings With ‘Emotional Weight’

Canadian National Holocaust Monument, . Image © Government of Canada

In an interview with Shaunacy Ferro for FastCo DesignDaniel Libeskind looks back over his built works and discusses the significant ‘emotional weight’ imbued in many of his projects, from the Jewish Museum in Berlin to his masterplan for Ground Zero in New York City. When asked why he continually returns to projects such as Holocaust memorials – with the Canadian National Holocaust Memorial currently underway in Ottawa - Libeskind stated: “It’s not something that I choose very lightly, because it’s very difficult, but I believe that it’s very important.” For him, creating these monuments is part of the act of doing “something that moves us beyond just the darkness and gives us something positive. [...] Even when it comes to the memory, you can’t just dwell on the irreversibility of the tragedy. You have to have something hopeful.”

Diagram: Canadian National Holocaust Monument. Image © Government of Canada

AD Classics: Jewish Museum, Berlin / Daniel Libeskind

Read the article in full here.

Apartments Charlotte / Michels Architekturbüro

© Werner Huthmacher

Architects: Michels Architekturbüro
Location: Charlottenstraße, 10117 Berlin,
Property Developer: WI Concept, Berlin
Area: 347.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Werner Huthmacher

David Chipperfield’s “Sticks and Stones” Toys with Van Der Rohe’s Bones in Berlin

© Gili Merin

In Berlin, Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie has begun a new phase today with the opening of David Chipperfield’s intervention, a prologue to the imminent restoration which the famed British architect is about to undertake. Completed in 1968, the gallery was Mies’ last project and his final masterpiece; for nearly fifty years, nobody dared to touch it – until now. Marking this event is a large, site-specific , created by Chipperfield as an attempt to engage Mies in a spatial experiment (or perhaps a last, apologetic tribute to the 20th century master) moments before he is about to embark on a mission which will, inevitably, transform Mies’ ultimate legacy.

“Seoul: Towards a Meta-City” Exhibition Opens in Berlin

Courtesy of ANCB

On Thursday, the Aedes Network Campus Berlin (ANCB) Metropolitan Laboratory hosted a symposium to mark the opening of the  ”: Towards a New City,” in collaboration with the City of Seoul. The city has identified three key objectives to help them strike a balance between restoration and change when moving forward with future development: revival of history, restoration of nature, and renewal of people’s lives. Seven projects that reflect these goals are on display at the exhibition. For more details, continue reading after the break.

CocaCola Headquarters in Berlin / NPS Tchoban Voss

© Claus Graubner

Architects: NPS Tchoban Voss
Location: Stralauer Allee 4, 10245 , Germany
Architect In Charge: Sergei Tchoban, Architekt BDA
Project Manager And Partner: Philipp Bauer (service stage 1-2: Axel Binder)
Design Team: Christoph Heimermann, Anissa Landgraf, Kenan Ozan
Area: 10263.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Claus Graubner

The Factory Berlin / Julian Breinersdorfer Architecture

© Werner Huthmacher

Architects: Julian Breinersdorfer Architecture
Location: Berlin,
Project Team: Corentin Héraud, Eric Wolfgang Eisenhut, Sarina Giffhorn, Minho Park, Roma Gadomska-Miles, Martino Pacchetti, Cameron Halls, Roberta D’Alessandro, Julian Breinersdorfer, Rekha Barry
Area: 10000.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Werner Huthmacher

“Lina Bo Bardi: Together” at the DAZ Berlin

If you are in Berlin in August, make sure to check out the “Lina Bo Bardi: Together” at The Deutsche Architecture Zentrum, dedicated to the legacy of the famed Italian-born Brazilian architect, and focusing on her “capacity to engage with every facet of culture and to see the potential in all manner of people.” More on the exhibition after the break.

No Wódka / KONTENT

© Zajaczkowski Photography

Architects: KONTENT
Location: Pappelallee 10, ,
Architect In Charge: Monika Ryszka, Marcin Giemza
Area: 86 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Zajaczkowski Photography

Housing at the Old City Wall Berlin / Sohrab Zafari

© Christian Dammert, Aviel Avdar

Architects: Sohrab Zafari
Location: Waisenstraße 30, ,
Collaborators: Thomas Zeissig, Daniel Behnke, Roger Mandel
Year: 2014
Photographs: Christian Dammert, Aviel Avdar