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Buildings Are Not Sacred, but We Can Find Beauty Through Them

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

What makes something sacred? When does a building mean more to us than nearly all other places, spaces, objects, or activities in our lives? Architects strive to achieve the sacred in buildings, but it’s the rest of us who either sense it or not, whatever the aesthetics may be. I think the meaning of what is sacred to us can be most profoundly seen and felt when things change.

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Exploring the Structural Details of a Bamboo Dome

Through the analysis of an innovative bamboo grid structure created using augmented reality by architects Kristof Crolla and Garvin Goepel in August 2023, we delve into the intricate world of bamboo architecture, focusing on its application in dome structures through a series of detailed illustrations that uncover the depth of this sustainable material's capabilities.

German Design Awards 2025 Open Call for Entries With New AI Metaverse Category

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Companies, designers, architects and agencies worldwide are invited to submit their products and projects for the German Design Awards 2025. Organized by the German Design Council, the Awards set international standards for original design developments and competitiveness on the global market, whether through digitalization or AI. The platform honors only projects that are pioneering in the German and international design landscape with positive developments in circular design, making success visible, while also opening up a valuable network, international reach and additional market opportunities for the award winners.

AI and the Human Vector in Architecture: Embracing Emotional Engagement and Empathy

This article is the tenth in a series focusing on the Architecture of the Metaverse. ArchDaily has collaborated with John Marx, AIA, the founding design principal and Chief Artistic Officer of Form4 Architecture, to bring you monthly articles that seek to define the Metaverse, convey the potential of this new realm as well as understand its constraints. In this feature, architect John Marx questions the limits and capabilities of AI in architecture and in creating buildings that resonate deeply with people and communities.

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Customizable and Sustainable Porcelain Tiles on Demand: The Case of Kaolin

 | Sponsored Content

Personalization of architectural and design elements has become an important global trend in the creation of exceptional and individualized spaces. These days, anything that can be personalized is fair game, with both clients and architects eager to stand out and create designs that are a true reflection of their personal tastes and lifestyles. In the realm of porcelain tiles, personalization is a key way to infuse design with personality, which the brand Kaolin has been focusing on through its Customization Program.

Working Smarter, Not Harder to Reduce Emissions from Concrete and Steel

It’s now clear that approximately 80% of emissions from landscape architecture projects come from materials. This includes the extraction of natural resources, and their manufacturing, transportation, and construction in parks, plazas, streets, campuses, and neighborhoods. A significant portion of emissions in the built environment can be traced back to two materials: concrete and metal, which includes steel and aluminum.

The challenge lies in the fact that we use a large amount of both materials, they are difficult to replace due to their strength and utility, and improving their environmental impact is a complex process. But progress is being made.

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"Architecture is That Fixed Element Within Nature": David Montalba in My Point of View

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Discover the latest issue of Sky-Frame's 'My Point of View' with architect David Montalba.

David Montalba was born in Switzerland but grew up in California. He became a passionate surfer, bobbing in the waves of the Pacific, staring at the land, yet always feeling and hearing the ocean around him; profoundly connected to nature.

“I was surfing by the time I was 12 or 13, and it was my driving force probably all the way up to 18 or 19,” he notes. “It brought a kind of spirituality to my life. That was when I felt most connected to nature and I was truly with myself… It’s still a really special thing for me. It’s one of those things that can both ground you and connect you with nature in a unique way.” 

The Second Studio Podcast: Concepts in Architecture Offices

The Second Studio (formerly The Midnight Charette) is an explicit podcast about design, architecture, and the everyday. Hosted by Architects David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, it features different creative professionals in unscripted conversations that allow for thoughtful takes and personal discussions.

A variety of subjects are covered with honesty and humor: some episodes are interviews, while others are tips for fellow designers, reviews of buildings and other projects, or casual explorations of everyday life and design. The Second Studio is also available on iTunes, Spotify, and YouTube.

This week David and Marina of FAME Architecture & Design discuss architecture concepts in the office. The two cover the importance of conceptual thinking, the lack of concepts in architecture offices, projects in architecture school vs in practice, the challenges of merging conceptual thinking and technical aspects in practice, and more. Enjoy!

Barcelona World Capital of Architecture 2026: 10 Blind Walls International Ideas Competition for Young Architects

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As Barcelona gears up to be the World Capital of Architecture in 2026, it is calling on young architects under 35 to reimagine 10 permanent blind walls, one in each district, and transform them into new facades that will leave a legacy in the city. This International Ideas Competition for Young Architects aims to improve the quality of public space through transformation and revitalization. Organized by the Barcelona City Council and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe, made jointly with UNESCO and the International Union of Architects (UIA), it seeks architectural proposals that give meaning to walls that are currently anonymous and without any prominence, exposed in public space in a permanent provisional state.

Why So Many Banal Boxes? Because Architecture Reflects the Ethos of Its Time

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

The whining of architects is futile. The stick-frame-over-podium building—the so-called 5-over-1—is here to stay. The Box, as I like to refer to it, utilizes the hybrid technology of a concrete-and-steel base below wood-frame construction, and is used predominantly for market-rate housing. Despite the common negative reaction to its banal aesthetics, the appeal to a large segment of apartment consumers is undeniable. It’s an obvious hit with developers, too.

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The Rise of Night Mayors: Managing Economy, Culture Security and Climate Change after Dark

Over the years, the nocturnal landscape of cities has witnessed a significant transformation, marked by the emergence of more than 80-night mayors globally, a trend that has been on the rise since the early 2000s. Andreina Seijas, currently working as an Associate at Gehl, has analyzed these shifting dynamics of night-time governance in her research and during her doctoral studies at Harvard GSD. Seijas speaks in the interview about this development, challenges, and opportunities with night mayors, global differences, and the role of climate change. Seijas' upbringing in Caracas, Venezuela, where safety concerns dictated strict curfews, ignited her passion for creating safer, more inclusive urban environments, particularly for the youth. Her quest for a better future for the urban night explores the potential for cities to become safer, more inclusive, and more productive by creating spaces for work and leisure after dark.

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