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Whose Eyes on the Street / Liu Jian for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

08:30 - 11 July, 2019
Whose Eyes on the Street / Liu Jian for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, Two Gray Bullet Security Cameras © Scott Webb
Two Gray Bullet Security Cameras © Scott Webb

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

Documentary Film Explores How Architects Can Help Reform the Criminal Justice System

06:30 - 11 July, 2019
Documentary Film Explores How Architects Can Help Reform the Criminal Justice System, Frank Gehry and a student model from one of his studios on prison design. Image © Frank Gehry: Building Justice
Frank Gehry and a student model from one of his studios on prison design. Image © Frank Gehry: Building Justice

This article was originally published in Metropolismag.com.

Set to screen at the ADFF:NOLA festival, Frank Gehry: Building Justice showcases how Gehry-led student architecture studios developed proposals for more humane prisons.

Thanks to initiatives like the Art for Justice Fund, Open Society Foundations, and a slew of insightful reporting, the American criminal justice system has been under great scrutiny and pressure to reform. Some of these changes have been quite prominent—such as the increasingly-widespread decriminalization of pot and pending major federal legislation—and have faced opposition from the powerful lobbying of the private prison corporations. However, despite the depth and breadth of criminal justice reform, one critically important element has remained mostly overlooked: the design of correctional facilities.

How to Design an Accessible Kitchen: Adjustable and Multifunctional Furniture

04:00 - 10 July, 2019
How to Design an Accessible Kitchen: Adjustable and Multifunctional Furniture, Courtesy of Häfele
Courtesy of Häfele

Universal accessibility in architecture refers to the capacity that all people have to access and inhabit a space regardless of their cognitive and physical capacities, and it is a subject that cannot be dismissed. Although little modifications can make a difference, it is ideal for the spaces to be thought out according to universal design guidelines from the beginning.

In the case of the kitchens, a series of new technologies that increase the comfort and efficiency of our daily spaces have made an appearance. Thus, multiplying its functions and allowing better use of the available surface. Let's take a look at the latest innovations presented by Häfele.

Courtesy of Häfele Courtesy of Häfele Courtesy of Häfele Courtesy of Häfele + 24

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Architects to Project Managers: Making the Leap

Sponsored Article
Keypath Education
Keypath Education

Commercial project performance has risen globally on a year-to-year basis. Reports from the Project Management Institute (PMI) show that 71 percent of projects have met their original goals and business intent in 2018, up from 68 percent in 2016.

Project managers have continued to be a driving force behind this change and they are in high demand around the world. PMI also reported the need for 97.7 million project professionals globally by 2027. Without qualified talent in these positions, billions of dollars could be lost to businesses worldwide.

8 Interior Acoustic Panels and Their Constructive Details

09:00 - 9 July, 2019
8 Interior Acoustic Panels and Their Constructive Details, HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

Picture this. You're in a restaurant and you can hear the conversation of the person in the table next to you better than the person you're sitting with. Then, everyone begins to speak louder, making the environment chaotic. Absorption, reflection, reverberation, frequency, decibels, etc. Although acoustics is a complex science that can render buildings almost uninhabitable when not properly thought out, architects do not always possess the theoretical resources nor have the necessary concern to develop acoustically comfortable spaces.

BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam + 37

Federico Babina's New Series Abstracts the Drawing Process

07:30 - 9 July, 2019
Federico Babina's New Series Abstracts the Drawing Process, © Federico Babina
© Federico Babina

Federico Babina has published the latest series from his extensive collection of architectural imagery. “Abstructure: architectural embryos” seeks to question the use of architecture in creating a drawing, rather than the use of a drawing in creating architecture.

Through the compositions, Babina proposes an ideal link between architecture as a form of representation and the representation used in the drawings. Volumes of architecture are broken down to achieve an “abstract” representation, without losing the essence of the design.

© Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina + 24

Black Mirror: What Can it Teach us About the Future of Architecture?

07:00 - 9 July, 2019
© Maíra Acayaba
© Maíra Acayaba

Unlike its TV and film counterparts, which imagine the future as an over-populated dystopian nightmare overrun with violence and chaos, Black Mirror paints a picture of a near future that aligns far more with our current reality--and nowhere is this more apparent than in the architecture shown in the series.

A Photographic Essay on the Reification of Bodies in Neufert's Ergonomics

04:00 - 9 July, 2019
Human-Reification. Image © Paul Gisbrecht
Human-Reification. Image © Paul Gisbrecht

The relationship between the human body and architecture has always been a key element in architectural design and practice, however, the connection between the two wasn't documented or even accepted until the rise of ergonomics some years ago. Nowadays, the question is how is the body perceived in modern times? How does this perception influence the way we design the buildings and spaces that we inhabit? Too often, ergonomics is seen as a discipline that emphasizes the separation between body and object; however, not only is it the connection between them, it is also the pre-established blueprint that maximizes and synchronizes their productivity. At its most basic level, it's a technical discourse on the increasingly mechanized human dwelling. 

An Architecture of Turbulence

12:15 - 8 July, 2019
An Architecture of Turbulence, Courtesy of rzlbd
Courtesy of rzlbd

A single family house may often have been considered as a very small pixel within any urban context, but the fact is, on average more than fifty percent of the urban fabric is being shaped by these tiny small pixels. It is well said by Tadao Ando: “The house is the building type that can change society.” Thus, this is how a client, a developer, a builder, an architect, or a designer could or should be responsible and willingly participate in a collective effort to shape a better urban context.

Types of White: the Work of Fran Silvestre

07:00 - 8 July, 2019
Types of White: the Work of Fran Silvestre, © Fernando Alda
© Fernando Alda

There are many kinds of white, all have no color but they are very different from each other: some silent, others deafening; there is the white of absence and also the one of eloquent presence; neutral white is very common, which one day may be painted with other tones; but there are also things born to be white, which could not be of any another color. Fran Silvestre’s architecture is composed of few essential signs, lines, planes and volumes thought and built with great geometric control.

Boost Your Project Using Assets In 3D Scenes

06:15 - 8 July, 2019
Boost Your Project Using Assets In 3D Scenes, Courtesy of Enscape
Courtesy of Enscape

Presenting your model containing various assets can give your client a better understanding and vision of how everything would look in real life. There is no need for building 3D scene objects by yourself or pay a lot of money for them. For example, if you own an Enscape license you have access to many kinds of 3D models, such as people, furniture, vegetation, street items, vehicles and other accessories. Just by using drag and drop, you can put the assets into your model and scale them to the size you need.

In some cases, an experienced user would be able to create similar content using your CAD software or import it from other sources – but even then, those assets would demand a lot more resources. But if you would use unnecessarily complex and/or foreign geometry in your CAD, those assets would take a lot more resources and the 3D views would be much slower. Enscape content, instead, is represented by a simple placeholder in your CAD program (Revit, SketchUp, Rhino or ArchiCAD) and replaced with these high-quality components in Enscape’s real-time rendering environment. The web-based library is being updated regularly.

Courtesy of Enscape Courtesy of Enscape Courtesy of Enscape Courtesy of Enscape + 10

12 Steps to a Successful Critique

10:00 - 7 July, 2019
12 Steps to a Successful Critique , © Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond

Juries, assessments, 15 minutes of hell... no matter what you call it, a critique is always agonizing. Regardless of how confident you are with your proposal and how much thought and effort you have put into every detail, at least one of the jury members will make sure to find something to complain about.

To prepare you for upcoming juries, artist Chanel Dehond has illustrated 12 steps to having a successful critique (or surviving one, at least).

Tokyo Travel Diary: Architecture and Manga

10:00 - 6 July, 2019
Tokyo Travel Diary: Architecture and Manga, Montagem feita a partir dos desenhos cedidos pelos autores. . Image Cortesia de a+t architecture publishers
Montagem feita a partir dos desenhos cedidos pelos autores. . Image Cortesia de a+t architecture publishers

Traveling around Japan can be an impressive experience for a Western tourist - especially if they have some connection with architecture. In addition to the huge cultural differences, the country is known for its rich architectural production - eight of the 42 Pritzker Prize laureates are Japanese - which has maintained its consistency since the 1960s.

SKNYPL Explores the Role of Urbanism in Creating and Overcoming Fear

08:00 - 6 July, 2019
SKNYPL Explores the Role of Urbanism in Creating and Overcoming Fear , via SKNYPL on Vimeo
via SKNYPL on Vimeo

The London Festival of Architecture, the world’s largest annual festival of its kind, took place across the city this June. The month-long festival welcomed thousands of people to explore architecture installations and creations, and take part in the activities and discussions, which included an event put together by SKNYPL.

The theme for the year 2019 was ‘Boundaries’ in all its forms: zones, walls, city limits… And for their first international show, SKNYPL presented “PHOBOS”, a film-installation about Moscow and the fearful impact of having physical and metaphysical boundaries. The studio created a special online version of the film especially for ArchDaily readers.

Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example

07:00 - 5 July, 2019
Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example, © Carolina Barría Kemp, under license <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt
© Carolina Barría Kemp, under license CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt

Chile is a country used to natural disasters as much as to the reconstruction process. However, the frequency of these cycles has increased over the years. According to the Ministry of Interior (Homeland), 43% of all natural disasters recorded in Chile since 1960 happened between 2014 and 2017. In fact, the government is already involved in several reconstruction processes across the country.

Designed by Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos, Kaukari Urban Park turned the channel of the Copiapó River into an accessible urban green space, capable of controling potential floods, just as it happened in 2015. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Designed by Sebastian Irarrázaval, the Constitución Public Library was part of a public-private initiative taken to rebuild the city of Constitución after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Felipe Díaz Contardo Designed by PLAN Arquitectos, Constitución's Consistorial Town Hall was part of the reconstruction of the city after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Pablo Blanco Villa Verde Housing / ELEMENTAL. Image © Suyin Chia + 7

RPBW on the Roles of Architects and What Makes their Office Unique

04:00 - 5 July, 2019
RPBW on the Roles of Architects and What Makes their Office Unique , SGBL Headquarters Beirut. Image © RPBW
SGBL Headquarters Beirut. Image © RPBW

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

George Orwell x Leonardo da Vinci / Daan Roosegaarde for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

11:00 - 4 July, 2019
George Orwell x Leonardo da Vinci / Daan Roosegaarde for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, © Studio Daan Roosegaarde
© Studio Daan Roosegaarde

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

It’s Time to End the Reign of Single-Family House Zoning

07:00 - 4 July, 2019
It’s Time to End the Reign of Single-Family House Zoning, An aerial view of housing developments near Markham, Ontario. Image © IDuke, November 2005
An aerial view of housing developments near Markham, Ontario. Image © IDuke, November 2005

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Practicing architects live and die by zoning regulations. We begin routine projects by reading ordinances and calling local officials to reassure clients that their desired outcomes will be possible under current land-use laws. If we’re lucky, the project will be built without troublesome variances and hearings before stony-faced zoning boards. Increasingly, however, what seemed straightforward and responsible 15 years ago is today considered controversial enough to merit a public hearing, and perhaps the assistance of high-priced attorneys. Often, the issue is protecting the “rights” of nearby homeowners, who see their property values threatened by any new development.

School and Daycare Projects for Different Climates

05:00 - 4 July, 2019
School and Daycare Projects for Different Climates, HN Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Toshinari Soga (studio BAUHAUS)
HN Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Toshinari Soga (studio BAUHAUS)

European children spend approximately 200 days a year at primary school. Even though the academic year in most parts of the world is not as long as in Europe, the place where children and adolescents spend the most time, following their own homes, is usually in educational institutions. These can be places for learning, playing and socializing, and as sad as it may be, they can also be safer places for children living in environments of abandonment, hunger, and violence, providing them with opportunities and even meals. A United Kingdom-wide survey found that the differences in physical characteristics of classrooms accounted for 16% of the variations in learning progress over the course of a year. In other words, the better a classroom is designed, the better children perform academically. According to the study, the factors that most affect children are sunlight, indoor air quality, acoustic environment, temperature, the design of the classroom itself and the stimulation within it.

Patrik Schumacher on Parametric Design and the Early Days of Zaha Hadid Architects

04:00 - 4 July, 2019
Patrik Schumacher on Parametric Design and the Early Days of Zaha Hadid Architects, Patrik Schumacher. Image © ZHA
Patrik Schumacher. Image © ZHA

Design:ED Podcast is an inside look into the field of architecture told from the perspective of individuals that are leading the industry. This motivational series grants unique insight into the making of a successful design career, from humble beginnings to worldwide recognition. Every week, featured guests share their personal highs and lows on their journey to success, that is sure to inspire audiences at all levels of the industry. Listening to their stories will provide a rare blueprint for anyone seeking to advance their career, and elevate their work to the next level.

In this episode of Design:ED Podcast, Patrik Schumacher — the company director and Senior Designer for the esteemed Zaha Hadid Architects — sits down to discuss the future of parametric design, the early days of Zaha Hadid Architects, and how the firm is continuing the legacy of Zaha Hadid after her passing in 2016.

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