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Emergency Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Refugee Camps: From Temporary Settlements to Permanent Dwellings

With more than 70 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, according to the UNHCR, and nearly 25.9 million refugees, the time has come to reconsider the traditional emergency camp approach. Although the concept is temporary by definition, in real life the lifespan of these refugee camps exceeds the planned and the expected.

Ranging from seven to seventeen years, most of these settlements surpass their expiry dates. Actually, on average, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Kenya, "many displaced persons spend more than 16 years living as refugees in temporary shelter."

Courtesy of ACNUR SANLIURFA, TURKEY - February 19, 2014: Aerial view of Akcakale Refugee Camp. Approximately 28.000 Syrian people reside in Akcakale Tent Camp in Urfa.. Image via Shutterstock/ By answer5 Aerial shot of syrian refugees camp in Kilis,Turkey. Image via Shutterstock/ By savas_bozkaya Aerial View of Zaatari Refugee Camp. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia + 10

How Community Participation can Assist in Architectural and Urban Post-Disaster Reconstruction

The concepts of autonomy, collaboration, and participation have gained relevance in architecture and urbanism through collaborative actions involving the community, architects, urban planners, and designers. As the number of climate disasters has significantly increased - doubling in the last 40 years according to a report released in 2016 by CRED (Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters) - in addition to conflicts and other tragedies, the demand for the rebuilding of houses and infrastructure in affected areas has grown simultaneously. This has called for a major collaborative effort in architectural and urban reconstruction.

The Use of Prefabrication in 6 Emergency Projects Around the World

Rural Housing Prototype in Apan / DVCH De Villar CHacon Architecture. Image: © Jaime Navarro Soto
Rural Housing Prototype in Apan / DVCH De Villar CHacon Architecture. Image: © Jaime Navarro Soto

Emergencies include a variety of contemporary scenarios ranging from natural disasters to extreme poverty or isolation due to social and political conflicts. In all cases, the disruption of normality and the requirement of basic needs for maintaining a decent quality of life become the basis for finding quick and efficient alternatives to respond to this type of urgency.

How New York City's Architecture Has Responded to National Emergencies over the Last 20 Years

New York City is the pinnacle hybrid between the vibrant and granular neighborhoods that Jane Jacobs once envisioned and the sweeping urban innovations of Robert Moses. However, its diverse population has experienced hardship over the last twenty years, forcing the city into a recursive wave of self-reflection to reevaluate the urban strategies, design trends, and global transportation methods that it had grown so accustomed to. After the September 11th and Hurricane Sandy tragedies, the delicate balance between promoting a sense of individual culture and the strength in unity that New Yorkers are so often known for served as the lifeblood for revitalization. New York City has consistently handled adversity, by always rethinking, redesigning, and rebuilding this city for a better future.

The Humanitarian Works of Shigeru Ban

Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough
Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough

2014 Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban may be as well known for his innovative use of materials as for his compassionate approach to design. For a little over three decades, Ban, the founder of the Voluntary Architects Network, has applied his extensive knowledge of recyclable materials, particularly paper and cardboard, to constructing high-quality, low-cost shelters for victims of disaster across the world —from Rwanda to Haiti, to Turkey, Japan, and more. We've rounded up 10 projects of his humanitarian work, explained by Shigeru Ban Architects themselves.

Paper Log House India. Image © Kartikeya Shodhan Hualin Temporary Elementary School. Image © Li Jun Paper Concert Hall L'Aquila. Image © Didier Boy de la Tour Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough + 25

Streetlight Tagpuro / Eriksson Furunes + Leandro V. Locsin Partners + Boase

© Alexander Eriksson Furunes © Alexander Eriksson Furunes © Alexander Eriksson Furunes © Alexander Eriksson Furunes + 23