ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

Elytra Filament Pavilion Explores Biomimicry at London's Victoria and Albert Museum

08:00 - 25 May, 2016
Elytra Filament Pavilion Explores Biomimicry at London's Victoria and Albert Museum , © NAARO via the V&A
© NAARO via the V&A

The Victoria and Albert Museum has unveiled its latest installation: the Elytra Filament Pavilion, a project displaying the culmination of four years of research on the integration of architecture, engineering, and biomimicry principles, in an exploration of how biological fiber systems can be transferred to architecture.

The 200-square-meter structure is inspired by lightweight construction principles found in nature, namely "the fibrous structures of the forewing shells of flying beetles known as elytra," states a press release.

Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron

11:00 - 23 May, 2016
Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +8

Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid

09:30 - 22 May, 2016
Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid, Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture
Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture

In their semester-long project at Zaha Hadid’s final studio course at the Yale School of Architecture, students Lisa Albaugh, Benjamin Bourgoin, Jamie Edindjiklian, Roberto Jenkins and Justin Oh envisioned a new a high density mixed-use project for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard, the largest undeveloped piece of land still existing in central London.

Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture +17

Monocle 24's The Urbanist: Live (2016)

16:00 - 18 May, 2016
Monocle 24's The Urbanist: Live (2016), The Urbanist LIVE - Monocle
The Urbanist LIVE - Monocle

Join us for this special live episode of The Urbanist at our Marylebone HQ, where Monocle editor Andrew Tuck hands over the floor to city-planners, policy-makers and urban leaders to discuss how to build a better London. How would you ​fix the capital? We’ll look at transport, culture, housing, business, the night-time economy and much more. Be part of the debate following the election of the city’s new mayor.

OMA Partner Reinier de Graaf on the Social Dimension of Luxury Housing at Holland Green

16:50 - 12 May, 2016
OMA Partner Reinier de Graaf on the Social Dimension of Luxury Housing at Holland Green, © Nick Gutteridge
© Nick Gutteridge

This week, OMA has unveiled their latest project in London, Holland Green. Working alongside Allies & Morrison, the firm has created three new luxury residential buildings on a site of significant cultural importance: the former home of the Commonwealth Institute, designed by Sir Robert Matthew, one of the founding partners of RMJM. As a result, OMA and Allies & Morrison’s Holland Green project involved much more than just adding fuel to the fire of London’s booming luxury residential market—it also involved an extensive conversion to the original 1962 Commonwealth Institute exhibition hall, funded through the scheme’s profitable residential offering, to prepare the heritage building for its new tenants the Design Museum.

ArchDaily spoke with Reinier de Graaf, the partner in charge of the project at OMA, to discuss the development’s social aspirations, the challenges of the London context, and the story behind the project.

© Philip Vile © Sebastian van Damme © Philip Vile © Sebastian van Damme +12

Zaha Hadid Architects and Others Envision Heathrow's Future

08:00 - 12 May, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects and Others Envision Heathrow's Future , Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre
Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre

Heathrow Airport is offering a first glimpse at commissioned expansion proposals by Zaha Hadid Architects, Grimshaw, HOK, and Benoy, that will shape the future of the global hub in London. The project brief called for "bold ideas to create a world-class sustainable airport that [will] deliver innovations in passenger service, integrate local communities, and showcase the best of British design." Challenging the architects to push the boundaries of what is the current airport typology, the proposals are meant to drive a step change in global airport design.

Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre Grimshaw Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre HOK Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre Benoy Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre +4

Building on the Built: the Work of Jonathan Tuckey Design

04:00 - 12 May, 2016
Building on the Built: the Work of Jonathan Tuckey Design, Exhibition. Image © James Brittain
Exhibition. Image © James Brittain

In Granary Square, located in London’s King’s Cross, there is a fragment of the poem Brill by Aidan Dunn set into the ground, which reads: “King’s Cross, dense with angels and histories. There are cities beneath your pavements, cities behind your skies.” Anchored by the converted granary building and a rejuvenated stretch of canal, Argent’s ongoing King’s Cross development is an appropriate setting for Building on the Built, an exhibition which presents the work of London-based practice Jonathan Tuckey Design.

Crossrail Unveils New Station Designs for London's Elizabeth Line

12:00 - 11 May, 2016
Paddington Station, Proposed Ticket Hall. Image Courtesy of Crossrail
Paddington Station, Proposed Ticket Hall. Image Courtesy of Crossrail

Crossrail Limited has released new renderings of stations set to open on the Elizabeth Line in London. Notable features of the new stations include step-free access from train to street, and seamless integration into the existing Transport for London (TfL) network. Seating, signage and full-height platform screen doors emulate precedents within the system to promote ease and familiarity. The designs strive for simplicity and clarity with reduced visual clutter and clear sight lines along platforms. Additionally, there will be permanent artworks installed and fully-integrated in many of the central London stations. The stations depicted – Paddington, architect Weston Williamson, Bond Street, architect John McAslan + Partners, Tottenham Court Road, architect Hawkins\Brown, Farringdon, architect Aedas, Liverpool Street, architect Wilkinson Eyre, Whitechapel, architect BDP, and Woolwich, architect Weston Williamson – are scheduled to begin service in December of 2018.

Tottenham Court Road, Proposed Platform Level at Dean Street. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Farringdon Station, Proposed Platform Level Concourse. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Woolwich Station, Proposed Platform. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Farringdon Station, Proposed Station Concourse at Cowcross Street Entrance. Image Courtesy of Crossrail +16

Holland Green / OMA + Allies & Morrison

07:20 - 11 May, 2016
Holland Green / OMA + Allies & Morrison, © Nick Gutteridge
© Nick Gutteridge

© Philip Vile © Philip Vile © Sebastian van Damme © Nick Gutteridge +31

London's Victoria & Albert Museum to Present "A World of Fragile Parts" at 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 11 May, 2016
London's Victoria & Albert Museum to Present "A World of Fragile Parts" at 2016 Venice Biennale, V&A Italian Cast Court, 1920. Image © V&A Images
V&A Italian Cast Court, 1920. Image © V&A Images

The 2016 Venice Biennale will see the inaugural collaboration between La Biennale and London's Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) with an exhibition located in the Sale d’Armi (Arsenale) entitled A World of Fragile Parts. The show aims to explore the threats facing the preservation of global heritage sites and how the production of copies can aid in the preservation of cultural artefacts.

See All 36 Winners of the 2016 RIBA London Awards

12:00 - 8 May, 2016
See All 36 Winners of the 2016 RIBA London Awards, © Edmund Sumner
© Edmund Sumner

From a shortlist of 68 buildings, 36 London projects have been awarded the 2016 RIBA London Awards for architectural excellence, the city's most prestigious design honor. The winners include a home for ravens, a Japanese-inspired London terrace home and a historical restoration. All of these designs will be further considered for the RIBA National Awards, to be announced in July. The winners of the national award will then create a shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize – the highest award for architecture in the UK.

Panel Discussion: Architectural disAssociation

14:00 - 4 May, 2016
Panel Discussion: Architectural disAssociation, Event poster
Event poster

Architectural disAssociation - A reflection on the state of the education of architecture at the AA. Open discussion inviting everyone with an opinion of the school - students, tutors and alumni alike to retrospectively reflect on the state of the AA's unit system and speculate the possible future of its education. This discussion will have no panel as it is an open floor discussion.

Anish Kapoor Studios II, III, IV, V, VI & VII / Caseyfierro Architects

02:00 - 2 May, 2016
Anish Kapoor Studios II, III, IV, V, VI & VII  / Caseyfierro Architects, © Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson

© Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson © CFA © Jim Stephenson +28

Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben to Undergo Renovations

12:00 - 1 May, 2016
Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben to Undergo Renovations, © Flickr CC User Alun Salt, Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© Flickr CC User Alun Salt, Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

The Parliament of the United Kingdom has announced a series of renovations that will take place on Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben in London, starting in early 2017. During the renovation period, the tower and clock will be partially covered with scaffolding, which will be removed as the work progresses. Moreover, the clock mechanism will be stopped for several months, during which there will be no chiming or striking of the iconic bells. 

Anish Kapoor Studio I / Caseyfierro Architects

22:00 - 26 April, 2016
Anish Kapoor Studio I  / Caseyfierro Architects, © Ben Blossom
© Ben Blossom

© Ben Blossom © Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson © CFA +17

Take a Look Through London's History with this Interactive Map

11:30 - 21 April, 2016
Take a Look Through London's History with this Interactive Map, via Locating London's History
via Locating London's History

It's no secret that architects are often fascinated by maps, and in the age of Google - where access to accurate maps of almost anywhere in the world has become universal - maps have become one of the most powerful ways to understand our cities. Interestingly, Google has in a way enabled a new way to interrogate maps from the past, as historic maps can be more easily overlaid with the Google interface to make comparisons to the present day. That's just what the website Locating London's Past has done, creating a tool to compare three maps: the current version of Google Maps, the first Ordnance Survey map from 1863-80, and John Rocque's 1746 Survey of London, allowing web users to see the growth of the UK capital over the past 270 years.

Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building

07:00 - 21 April, 2016
Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building, Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects
Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects

Dublin-based Grafton Architects, who last year were awarded the Jane Drew Prize, have seen off competition from the likes of Herzog & de Meuron and David Chipperfield Architects to win the contest to design the London School of Economics’ (LSE) £100 million ($144 million) Paul Marshall Building. The new center will house the academic departments of Accounting, Finance and Management and research centres, including the Marshall Institute, with teaching facilities as well as new multipurpose sports and arts facilities. Grafton Architects are reportedly "absolutely delighted to be given this opportunity to build in this unique location in Lincoln's Inn Fields, across from the wonderful Sir John Soane’s Museum, for a visionary client such as LSE."

Coup De Grâce

04:00 - 19 April, 2016
Coup De Grâce, City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes
City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes

The following article was first published by Volume Magazine in their 47th issue, The System*. You can read the Editorial of this issue, How Much Does Your System Weigh?here.

Neoliberal post-fordism poses a dramatic challenge to urbanism as we have come to know it since the early 20th century. The public planning process has become more and more an embarrassment and obstacle to urban and economic flourishing. It’s a relic of a bygone era. The high point of urban planning was the post-war era of socialist planning and re-construction of the built environment. With respect to this period we can speak about physical or perhaps ‘positive planning’, in the sense of governments formulating concrete plans and designs about what to build. This era has long gone as society evolved beyond the simple fordist society of mechanical mass production to our current post-fordist networked society. When a few basic standards were functionally separate, optimized and endlessly repeated, central planning could still cope with the pace of societal progress. The world we live in today is far too multi-faceted, complex and dynamic to be entrusted to a central planning agency. The old model broke apart as it could not handle the level of complexity we live with and our cities should accommodate. The decentralized information processing mechanism of the market was indeed capable of managing such levels of complexity and, for this reason, has effectively taken over all positive decision-making processes.