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Barnard College, The Milstein Center / SOM

12:00 - 26 November, 2018
Barnard College, The Milstein Center / SOM, © Magda Biernat
© Magda Biernat

© Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat + 33

  • Architects

    SOM
  • Location

    3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027, United States
  • Area

    128000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities

09:30 - 24 November, 2018
4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities, © DLR Group
© DLR Group

As architects face up to the need for ethical, sustainable design in the age of climate change awareness, timber architecture is making a comeback in a new, technologically impressive way. Largely overlooked in the age of Modernism, recent years have seen a plethora of advancements related to mass timber across the world. This year alone, Japan announced plans for a supertall wooden skyscraper in Tokyo by 2041, while the European continent has seen plans for the world’s largest timber building in the Netherlands, and the world’s tallest timber tower in Norway.

The potential for mass timber to become the dominant material of future sustainable cities has also gained traction in the United States throughout 2018. Evolving codes and the increasing availability of mass timber is inspiring firms, universities, and state legislators to research and invest in ambitious projects across the country.

Studio Cadena Unveils "Happy" Installation in New York's Flatiron Plaza

13:00 - 21 November, 2018
Studio Cadena Unveils "Happy" Installation in New York's Flatiron Plaza, Happy. Image © Benjamin Cadena
Happy. Image © Benjamin Cadena

Studio Cadena’s Happy installation has been unveiled in New York's Flatiron Plaza. The project is the winner of the fifth annual Design Competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Van Alen Institute. As the centerpiece of the annual holiday program, the installation was selected by a jury with expertise across the worlds of design and public art, including representatives from the Flatiron Partnership, New York City DOT Art, and Van Alen Institute’s board of trustees.

Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock + 7

MVRDV's First US Project Breaks Ground in New York City

13:00 - 15 November, 2018
MVRDV's First US Project Breaks Ground in New York City, Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV
Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV

Dutch practice MVRDV has broken ground on Radio Tower & Hotel, a 21,800-square-meter mixed-use high rise located in the Washington Heights area in northern Manhattan. The 22-storey building is MVRDV’s first major project in the United States and combines hotel, retail, and office functions in vibrantly stacked blocks. The project was designed to reflecte the vivacious character of the neighborhood and set a direction for future development.

Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV + 9

Amazon Selects Both New York City and Arlington for HQ2

13:00 - 13 November, 2018
Amazon Selects Both New York City and Arlington for HQ2, Amazon Seattle HQ. Image © Flickr user Joe Behr licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
Amazon Seattle HQ. Image © Flickr user Joe Behr licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Amazon has selected New York City and Arlington for it's next headquarters, set to become two of the biggest economic development projects in the United States. Instead of choosing one site, Amazon will spread over $5 billion in construction and investments across the two locations. The tech giant will house at least 25,000 employees in each city, and could receive more than $2 billion in tax incentives. The new announcement ends a 14-month competition among cities across the country.

Bleecker Street / Junzi Kitchen

14:00 - 9 November, 2018
© Andres Orozco
© Andres Orozco

© Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco + 15

  • Architects

  • Location

    170 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10012, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Xuhui Zhang
  • Area

    1774.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Citigroup Center / Hugh Stubbins + William Le Messurier

22:00 - 6 November, 2018
AD Classics: Citigroup Center / Hugh Stubbins + William Le Messurier, © Flickr user paulkhor
© Flickr user paulkhor

This article was originally published on November 5, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

In a city of skyscrapers of nearly every shape and size, the Citigroup Center on Lexington Avenue is one of New York’s most unique. Resting on four stilts perfectly centered on each side, it cantilevers seventy-two feet over the sidewalk and features a trademark 45-degree sloping crown at its summit. The original structure responsible for these striking features also contained a grave oversight that nearly resulted in structural catastrophe, giving the tower the moniker of “the greatest disaster never told” when the story finally was told in 1995. The incredible tale—now legendary among structural engineers—adds a fascinating back-story to one of the most iconic fixtures of the Manhattan skyline.

© Flickr user Steven Severing-Haus © Flickr user paulkhor © Flickr user Jeff Stvan © Flickr user Axel Drainville + 10

Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center / Rockwell Group

03:00 - 5 November, 2018
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center / Rockwell Group, © Albert Vecerka / Esto
© Albert Vecerka / Esto

© Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto + 8

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Principal-in-Charge

    Shawn Sullivan
  • Design Lead

    Michael Fischer
  • Area

    17518.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

The Half House / Boro Architects + Cochineal Design

05:00 - 3 November, 2018
The Half House / Boro Architects + Cochineal Design, © Bjorg Magnea
© Bjorg Magnea

© Emma Tannenbaum © Bjorg Magnea © Bjorg Magnea © Emma Tannenbaum + 18

COOKFOX Studio / COOKFOX Architects

14:00 - 1 November, 2018
COOKFOX Studio / COOKFOX Architects, © Eric Laignel
© Eric Laignel

© Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel + 11

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Lead Architects

    COOKFOX Architects
  • Area

    18275.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union

09:00 - 1 November, 2018
Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union, Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union
Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York has unveiled an exhibition showcasing 50 years of undergraduate architectural thesis projects by students of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture.

Drawing together the works of Elizabeth Diller, Laurie Hawkinson, Daniel Libeskind, and others, the exhibition titled “Archive and Artifact: The Virtual and the Physical” presents hand-drawn, digital, and three-dimensional works.

Margaux Wheelock-Shew The Factory of Fake Autonomy: Reassembling the Social Landscape of Labor. Thesis, 2017-18. Photo by Lea Bertucci. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Stanley Allen. Project Title: The Theater of Production. Course/AY: Thesis, 1980-81.  Professors: John Hejduk, Raimund Abraham, Anthony Candido, Ricardo Scofidio, Robert Slutzky, Bernard Tschumi. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Daniel Libeskind. Project Title: Collage. Course/AY: Thesis, 1969-70. Professors: John Hejduk, Lewis Davis, Robert Slutzky, Fred Travsiano. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Edward Arcari. Project Title: Construction Site. Course/AY: Thesis, 1985-86. Professors: John Hejduk, Donald Wall, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union + 13

WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group

13:59 - 30 October, 2018
WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group, © Dave Burk
© Dave Burk

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Dave Burk + 12

  • Architects

  • Location

    421 8th Ave, New York, NY 10001, United States
  • Partners-in-Charge

    Bjarke Ingels, Daniel Sundlin, Beat Schenk
  • Project Designer

    Otilia Pupezeanu
  • Project Architect

    Jeremy Babel
  • Area

    930.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham

22:00 - 27 October, 2018
AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham, © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York
© Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York

This article was originally published on May 25, 2015. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Before the impossibly “super-thin” tower became ubiquitous on the Midtown Manhattan skyline, Raimund Abraham’s Austrian Cultural Forum challenged the limits of what could be built on the slenderest of urban lots. Working with a footprint no bigger than a townhouse (indeed, one occupied the site before the present tower), Abraham erected a daring twenty-four story high-rise only twenty-five feet across. Instantly recognizable by its profile, a symmetrical, blade-like curtain wall cascading violently toward the sidewalk, ACFNY was heralded by Kenneth Frampton as “the most significant modern piece of architecture to be realized in Manhattan since the Seagram Building and the Guggenheim Museum of 1959.” [1]

The massing of the building is dictated solely by zoning laws and the immediacy of its neighbors. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York The director's office that occupies the box-like protrusion on the southern facade. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York East-facing section with the "scissor stairs" on the left-hand side + 7

Junzi Kitchen Columbia University / Xuhui Zhang

16:00 - 26 October, 2018
Junzi Kitchen Columbia University / Xuhui Zhang, © Andres Orozco
© Andres Orozco

© Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco © Andres Orozco + 12

  • Architects

  • Location

    2896 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Xuhui Zhang
  • Area

    1800.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Adjaye’s 130 William Street Tower Begins Façade Installation in Manhattan

13:00 - 26 October, 2018
Adjaye’s 130 William Street Tower Begins Façade Installation in Manhattan, 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson
130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson

Adjaye Associates130 William Street residential tower in Lower Manhattan has begun installation of the building facade. As New York YIMBY reports, last week the hand-cast concrete arches started getting installed. Made to recall New York City’s historic fabric from the 19th and early 20th centuries, the facade was designed around an eclectic material and color palette. Once finished, the tower will include 244 new luxury condominiums in the Financial District.

130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson + 5

100 Years of Change in New York's Skyline: 1920 - 2020

04:00 - 18 October, 2018
100 Years of Change in New York's Skyline: 1920 - 2020, via Liberty Cruises
via Liberty Cruises

Manhattan is known for its iconic skyline, brimming with skyscrapers, high rises, and some of the most impressive architecture in the world. But it wasn’t always that way; it took hundreds of years for New York City to become the structurally diverse, world-famous city that it is today.

AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA

22:00 - 14 October, 2018
AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published on July 22, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

The New Museum is the product of a daring vision to establish a radical, politicized center for contemporary art in New York City. With the aim of distinguishing itself from the city’s existing art institutions through a focus on emerging artists, the museum’s name embodies its pioneering spirit. Over the two decades following its foundation in 1977, it gained a strong reputation for its bold artistic program, and eventually outgrew its inconspicuous home in a SoHo loft. Keen to establish a visual presence and to reach a wider audience, in 2003 the Japanese architectural firm SANAA was commissioned to design a dedicated home for the museum. The resulting structure, a stack of rectilinear boxes which tower over the Bowery, would be the first and, thus far, the only purpose-built contemporary art museum in New York City.[1]

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

Updated $13 Billion Plans for New York JFK Airport Overhaul Released

09:00 - 11 October, 2018
Updated $13 Billion Plans for New York JFK Airport Overhaul Released, via Governor of New York
via Governor of New York

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has unveiled an updated $13 billion plan to transform John F. Kennedy International Airport into a “world-class 21st-century airport.” The scheme will add two major international terminals at the North and South sides, increasing airport capacity by 4 million square feet and 15 million annual passengers.

The plans are derived from a 2017 masterplan led by Grimshaw Architects and Mott MacDonald, which sought to combine the airport’s eight disparate terminal sites into one unified system.

via Governor of New York via Governor of New York via Governor of New York via Governor of New York + 18