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20 Projects Featuring Animals That You Will Fauna Over

14:30 - 4 October, 2016

As we celebrate World Animal Day, take a look at 20 stunning projects we have previously published that do just that, celebrate animals #WorldAnimalDay. 

Whether the space was designed for them or these animals were simply photobombing, these inspiring project images illustrate our quadruped, furry friends enjoying architectural spaces.

See the 20 projects where humans are not the only users. 

9 Lessons For Post-Architecture-School Survival

08:00 - 19 August, 2016

We’ve already talked about this. You’re preparing your final project (or thesis project). You’ve gone over everything in your head a thousand times; the presentation to the panel, your project, your model, your memory, your words. You go ahead with it, but think you'll be lousy. Then you think just the opposite, you will be successful and it will all be worth it. Then everything repeats itself and you want to call it quits.  You don’t know when this roller coaster is going to end. 

Until the day arrives. You present your project. Explain your ideas. The committee asks you questions. You answer. You realize you know more than you thought you did and that none of the scenarios you imaged over the past year got even close to what really happened in the exam. The committee whisper amongst themselves. The presentation ends and they ask you to leave for a while. Outside you wait an eternity, the minutes crawling slowly. Come in, please. The commission recites a brief introduction and you can’t tell whether you were right or wrong. The commission gets to the point.

You passed! Congratulations, you are now their new colleague and they all congratulate you on your achievement. The joy washes over you despite the fatigue that you’ve dragging around with you. The adrenaline stops pumping. You spend weeks or months taking a much-deserved break. You begin to wonder: Now what?

The university, the institution that molded you into a professional (perhaps even more so than you would have liked), hands you the diploma and now you face the job market for the first time (that is if you haven’t worked before). Before leaving and defining your own markers for personal success (success is no longer measured with grades or academic evaluations), we share 9 lessons to face the world now that you're an architect.

Architecture Must Recognize the Debate Around Race and Gender in Addition to its Social Role

07:00 - 29 July, 2016

This article was submitted by one of our readers Stephanie Ribeiro, architecture and urban planning student at the Catholic University of Campinas. She is a black feminist activist, who has had her writings posted on Marie Claire magazine’s website, as well as on blogs Negras, Geledés, Capitolina, Think Olga, Folha de São Paulo and The Huffington Post. She currently writes for HuffPost and other portals. She has been voted one of the most influential black women on the internet by Black bloggers and is one of the Inspiring Women by Ong Think Olga. In 2015, she received the Theodosina Ribeiro Medal given by the Legislative Assembly of São Paulo, which honored her activism on behalf of black women. She is currently writing her first book, with Companhia das Letras.

My decision to study architecture was a naive one, made after having taken several vocational tests I found on Google. When I found out it was one of the toughest courses in Brazilian public universities, I thought about giving up. But I was already hooked by the history of architecture and its social role.

Call for Submissions: Obama Presidential Center

10:30 - 21 April, 2016
Call for Submissions: Obama Presidential Center

1. INTRODUCTION
“The Obama Presidential Center will bring to life the vision and legacy of President Obama, including inspiring an ethic of citizenship, expanding opportunity in a global age, and promoting peace, justice, and dignity throughout the world.” (Source: Obama Foundation)

This competition challenges designers to create an exceptional presidential library for U.S. President Obama (OPL). We look for design proposals with wide reaching architectural interventions that deal with the challenging South Side of Chicago, and make a case for a sustainable urban and economic growth. There are currently two potential site locations – one on the east side and the other on the west side of the University of Chicago (see p1.jpg): The Washington Park site and Jackson Park site. You are asked to make a choice between the two sites. There were numerous alter-native site proposals, e.g. sites in New York, Hawaii, Chicago etc. The Obama Foundation has identified these two properties as the ones with the most potential, based on key assumptions, opportunities and limitations relative to their contexts.

How To Eliminate Gender Disparity in Architecture, According to Our Readers

11:01 - 18 April, 2016
How To Eliminate Gender Disparity in Architecture, According to Our Readers, © Robert Venturi
© Robert Venturi

The movement towards gender equality in the architecture profession has been gaining attention for some time now, led in large part by surveys of the profession such as the AIA’s recent diversity study or of course the annual Women in Architecture survey by The Architectural Review and The Architects’ Journal. However, recently the debate around gender has taken on a different form; in a response to the AR's most recent survey published in RIBA Journal, for example, the curator of Turncoats and founder of the practices Interrobang and Studio Weave Maria Smith argues that it is time to move on to a more nuanced depiction of the problem. “I’d like to see a radical change in how this discussion is framed,” she says. “We must move away from generic indignation and start to properly interrogate why both men and women practice architecture the way they do.”

In light of this slow movement towards action in place of indignation, on International Women’s Day last month we asked our readers what exactly should be done to eliminate gender inequality in the field of architecture. The question provoked a broad and at times incredibly heated discussion - read on to find out what our readers had to say on the topic.

Female Architects Speak Out About Gender Differences in New York Times Article

12:00 - 17 April, 2016
Female Architects Speak Out About Gender Differences in New York Times Article, Clockwise from top left: Rosemary Park, Rebecca G. Barnes, Amity Kurt, Patricia Galván, Farida Abu-Bakare and Claire Weisz, women who responded to the survey. Image via The New York Times
Clockwise from top left: Rosemary Park, Rebecca G. Barnes, Amity Kurt, Patricia Galván, Farida Abu-Bakare and Claire Weisz, women who responded to the survey. Image via The New York Times

Gender inequality in the architecture profession has continued to be a cause for concern, with a recent survey from the AIA showing that women feel that little to no progress has been made with overcoming gender obstacles. Following the recent passing of Zaha Hadid, a powerful pioneer and role model for female designers, The New York Times launched an online survey asking women in architecture about their experiences in the profession. Read some of the excerpts from the two hundred responses they received after the break.

Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture

08:00 - 16 April, 2016
Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture, Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow
Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow

Following the death of Zaha Hadid on March 31st of this year Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, hones in on the role of women in architecture and design. They discuss why, despite an almost 50:50 gender split in undergraduate architecture courses, women are still grossly underrepresented at senior levels within the profession by featuring conversations with two leading female architects, Angela Brady OBE and Amanda Levete. The episode also looks back over the lives of some of architecture's overlooked heroines.

Los Angeles Architect Jennifer Siegal Wins 2016 arcVision Prize

13:30 - 8 April, 2016
Los Angeles Architect Jennifer Siegal Wins 2016 arcVision Prize, Works by OMD. Image Courtesy of arcVision
Works by OMD. Image Courtesy of arcVision

Jennifer Siegal, founder of Los Angeles-based Office of Mobile Design (OMD), has been announced as the winner of the fourth arcVision Prize – Women and Architecture, an international award to women’s architecture organized by Italcementi. Siegal was unanimously chosen by the jury for being “a fearless pioneer in the research and development of prefabricated construction systems, at low prices for disadvantaged users and areas, who has been able to invent and build practical solutions and a new language for mobile and low-cost housing."

"Innovation and unconventional thinking are both hardwired into my DNA. This shows in my body of work and research that questions everything, particularly the static, heavy, inflexible architecture that we somehow still expect in a world that is anything but," said Siegal in a press release.

Why Equal Representation for Women in Architecture is Better for Everyone

10:00 - 15 March, 2016
Why Equal Representation for Women in Architecture is Better for Everyone

In the ongoing debate about women in the architecture profession, you rarely hear an argument for why equal representation is important; it's generally assumed to be an unquestionable moral imperative. However, in this article originally published on the Huffington Post as "Why Women's Leadership Is Essential for Architects," Lance Hosey argues that, regardless of your position on equality as a moral imperative, better representation of women in architecture could benefit everyone in the profession—in very tangible ways.

Last week, on International Women's Day (March 8), the American Institute of Architects (AIA) published "Diversity in the Profession of Architecture," its first diversity report in a decade. The release follows the creation in December of the AIA's "Equity in Architecture Commission," a panel of twenty architects, educators, and diversity experts to investigate diversity and inclusion in the profession. The new report documents a survey of over 7,300 professional architects and students, including men and women, 79% of them whites and 21% people of color.

20 Women in Architecture Shortlisted for arcVision Prize

12:00 - 10 March, 2016
20 Women in Architecture Shortlisted for arcVision Prize, Francisco Rodrigues Lobo Secondary School by 2014 arcVision winner Inês Lobo Arquitectos. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Francisco Rodrigues Lobo Secondary School by 2014 arcVision winner Inês Lobo Arquitectos. Image © Leonardo Finotti

20 prominent women in architecture have been shortlisted for the arcVision Prize - a prize that "aims to give recognition to women whose work brings an innovative new design, theoretical or practical approach to the economic, social and cultural issues at play in the field of architecture." Referred to some as the "Pritzker for women," the yearly arcVision Prize is now in its fourth edition.

The full list of nominees includes:

What Should We Be Doing To Eliminate Gender Inequality in Architecture?

08:00 - 8 March, 2016
What Should We Be Doing To Eliminate Gender Inequality in Architecture?, Denise Scott Brown in Las Vegas in 1966. Image © Robert Venturi
Denise Scott Brown in Las Vegas in 1966. Image © Robert Venturi

In recent years, there has been a significant amount of attention paid to the gender debate in architecture, with many asking why, in the 21st century, our profession can still be such a challenging career path for women. In many ways, this focus on women in architecture has seemed successful: In 2014, Julia Morgan became the first woman awarded the AIA Gold Medal, and while Denise Scott-Brown may not have been retroactively awarded a Pritzker Prize, the AIA's decision to open up its Medal to more than one person at a time finally allowed her to join Julia Morgan on the (very short) list of female winners. Over in the UK, this year Zaha Hadid was awarded the RIBA Gold Medal, making her the first woman in history to receive the prize without sharing it with a male partner. Yet despite these apparent victories for equality in architecture, we still see headlines like the recent discovery by the AR's Women in Architecture Survey that gender disparities are, in fact, increasing.

Today, on International Women's Day, we wanted to open up a discussion among ArchDaily readers to see what else could be done. What more could architects, institutions and indeed even the media do to close the gender gap in our profession? Let us know in the comments below and the best responses will be featured in an upcoming article.

In Honor of Women's Day, 15 Exceptional Projects

06:00 - 8 March, 2016

Zaha Hadid, Di Zhang, Carme Pinos, Jeanne Gang, Carla Juaçaba, Bia Lessa, Elisabete de Oliveira Saldanha, Sandra Barclay, Kazuyo Sejima, Sharon Davis, Elisa Burnazzi,Tatiana Bilbao, Jô Vasconcellos, Odile Decq, María Victoria Besonías, Lina Bo Bardi. 

While there is still a lot of progress that needs to be made to achieve gender equality within the profession, women are behind some of the most recognizable and inspiring projects. To honor their work, and in light of International Women's Day, we present 15 outstanding projects designed by female architects. 

The selection features work by the only two women to have been awarded the Pritzker Prize – Zaha Hadid and Kazuyo Sejima – as well as projects designed by Sharon Davis and Elisabete de Oliveira Saldanha, who both won Building of the Year 2016 awards. All fifteen projects represent the potential of each architect and can serve as inspiration for everyone. 

View all of the projects after the break. 

Jeanne Gang Named Architect of the Year in AR's 2016 Women in Architecture Awards

10:30 - 4 March, 2016
Jeanne Gang Named Architect of the Year in AR's 2016 Women in Architecture Awards, Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership / Studio Gang. Image © Steve Hall for Hedrich Blessing
Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership / Studio Gang. Image © Steve Hall for Hedrich Blessing

The Architectural Review has announced the final winners in its 2016 Women in Architecture awards, awarding Mexican architect Gabriela Etchegaray with the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture, and Jeanne Gang with the Architect of the Year award. In honoring Gang and Etchegaray, the AR noted that both "have demonstrated excellence in design and a commitment to working both sustainably and democratically with local communities." The pair join other Women in Architecture Award winners Odile Decq and Julia Peyton-Jones, who last week received the 2016 Jane Drew Prize and Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, respectively. Read on for more about the awards.

Women in Architecture's 2016 Survey Finds Widened Gender Disparities

06:00 - 29 February, 2016
Women in Architecture's 2016 Survey Finds Widened Gender Disparities , via Women in Architecture
via Women in Architecture

The Architectural Review has released the results of the fifth annual Women in Architecture survey, providing insights into the experiences of over 1,000 women worldwide.

One out of five women responding to the survey said that they would not encourage a woman to start a career in architecture, and a similar proportion said they were unsure—only six out of ten overall would recommend an architectural career to another woman.

Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize

12:00 - 26 February, 2016
Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan
SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan

Julia Peyton-Jones has won the 2016 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize. Awarded as part of the Architectural Review's (AR) annual Women in Architecture Awards, the prize honors Peyton-Jones' "incredible global impact achieved with limited resources – and as someone who has done so much to nurture architectural vision and make architecture available to many people."

Peyton-Jones has serves as the Serpentine Gallery co-director for the past 25 years, overseeing the start of the Serpentine Gallery Pavillon commissions and opening of Zaha Hadid ArchitectsSerpentine Sackler Gallery. She will step down from her longstanding position this summer. 

Odile Decq Honored with 2016 Jane Drew Prize

12:30 - 25 February, 2016
Odile Decq Honored with 2016 Jane Drew Prize, Saint-Ange Residency / Studio Odile Decq. Image © Roland Halbe
Saint-Ange Residency / Studio Odile Decq. Image © Roland Halbe

Odile Decq has won the 2016 Jane Drew Prize as part of the Architectural Review's (AR) annual Women in Architecture Awards. Co-founder of Studio Odile Decq, the French architect was awarded for being a "a creative powerhouse, spirited breaker of rules and advocate of equality." Her diverse portfolio ranges from art galleries and museums, to social housing and infrastructure. She is best known for the Cargo incubator building in Paris and the Fangshan Tangshan National Geopark Museum in Nanjing, China.

AR Shortlists 15 for Women in Architecture Awards

12:53 - 10 February, 2016
AR Shortlists 15 for Women in Architecture Awards, © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

The Architectural Review (AR) has unveiled the candidates for its 2016 Woman Architect of the Year and the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture awards. Tatiana Bilbao, Jeanne Gang, Kazuyo Sejima and Charlotte Skene Catling are all being considered as the woman of the year for their impact and ability to inspire change within the profession. 

Eleven women are being considered for the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture prize for their "use of innovative architecture to effect positive social change." Read on to see them all. 

Take AD Magazine’s Women in Architecture Survey for Upcoming Special Edition

08:00 - 2 February, 2016
Take AD Magazine’s Women in Architecture Survey for Upcoming Special Edition, Courtesy of Architectural Design
Courtesy of Architectural Design

In August 1975, Architectural Design magazine published a special edition about Women in Architecture. At the time, director Monica Pidgeon sent letters to 100 architects asking what women can contribute to architecture that men can’t (and vice-versa), as well as the advantages and disadvantages of being a woman in the profession. 

Now, 40 years later, a new version of the study aims to repeat Pidgeon’s initiative through an online survey with similar questions