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Ada Louise Huxtable Prize: The Latest Architecture and News

Amanda Levete Wins 2018 Jane Drew Prize for Women in Architecture

14:00 - 1 February, 2018
Amanda Levete Wins 2018 Jane Drew Prize for Women in Architecture, AL_A's MAAT museum in Lisbon. Image © Francisco Nogueira
AL_A's MAAT museum in Lisbon. Image © Francisco Nogueira

British architect Amanda Levete has been selected as the recipient of the 2018 Jane Drew Prize, recognizing “an architectural designer who, through their work and commitment to design excellence, has raised the profile of women in architecture.”

Founder of London-based practice AL_A, Levete rose to promise as one half of Stirling Prize-winning practice Future Systems, which she ran with then-husband Jan Kaplický. Together, they completed paradigm-shifting and critically acclaimed works such as the Birmingham Selfridges and the Lord’s Media Centre, winner of the 1999 RIBA Stirling Prize.

Levete left Future Systems to form AL_A in 2009, where she found continued success designing cultural venues with bold materiality. Some of the firm’s best known works include the Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon, the Central Embassy Shopping Center in Bangkok, the 2015 MPavilion in Melbourne, and the recently-opened addition to the V&A museum in London.

Rachel Whiteread Wins 2017 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize

06:00 - 9 February, 2017
Rachel Whiteread Wins 2017 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, Caruso St John (UK) with artist Rachel Whiteread. Image © Caruso St John Architects, Marcus Taylor and Rachel Whiteread & Malcolm Reading Consultants
Caruso St John (UK) with artist Rachel Whiteread. Image © Caruso St John Architects, Marcus Taylor and Rachel Whiteread & Malcolm Reading Consultants

Artist Rachel Whiteread has won the 2017 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, which recognizes individuals working in the wider architectural industry who have made a significant contribution to architecture and the built environment. Whiteread was selected by respondents to the Architectural Review’s Women In Architecture: Working in Architecture survey.

Some of Whiteread’s notable work includes her 1993 Turner Prize-winning House, her collaboration with architects like Caruso St John on the UK Holocaust Memorial International Design Competition, and her participation on the RIBA Stirling Prize 2016 jury.

Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize

12:00 - 26 February, 2016
Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan
SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan

Julia Peyton-Jones has won the 2016 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize. Awarded as part of the Architectural Review's (AR) annual Women in Architecture Awards, the prize honors Peyton-Jones' "incredible global impact achieved with limited resources – and as someone who has done so much to nurture architectural vision and make architecture available to many people."

Peyton-Jones has serves as the Serpentine Gallery co-director for the past 25 years, overseeing the start of the Serpentine Gallery Pavillon commissions and opening of Zaha Hadid Architects' Serpentine Sackler Gallery. She will step down from her longstanding position this summer.

Jane Priestman Wins Inaugural Ada Louise Huxtable Prize

00:00 - 5 February, 2015
Jane Priestman Wins Inaugural Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, Priestman worked with Foster + Partners on the Stansted Airport during her time at the British Airports Authority. Image © Foster + Partners
Priestman worked with Foster + Partners on the Stansted Airport during her time at the British Airports Authority. Image © Foster + Partners

Judges Patty Hopkins, Eva Jiricna and John McAslan have awarded Jane Priestman the Ada Louise Huxtable Prize. The 85-year-old British designer, lauded for being a “visionary” client, is the first to receive this lifetime achievement award, which honors non-architects which have significantly contributed to the architectural profession.

“Her contribution to future generations is immeasurable,” said the judges. “Priestman had the belief that architecture could change people lives, and wanted to work with architects who could help her do it.”