the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Mexican Architecture

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Countries
  3. Mexico

Latest projects in Mexico

Latest news in Mexico

Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018

12:30 - 28 March, 2018
Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018, Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards
Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards

Results have been announced for the 5th Global LafargeHolcim Awards for Sustainable Construction, with three women-led teams awarded the gold, silver, and bronze positions. The design competition asked participants to speculate on future methods of balancing environmental performance, social responsibility and economic growth, “exemplifying architectural excellence and a high degree of transferability.”

Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers

08:00 - 17 March, 2018
Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers, © Lorena Darquea
© Lorena Darquea

The history of Mexican photography has contributed to highlighting Mexico's presence in the world. Photographers like Elsa Medina, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Maya Goded, and Juan Rulfo have masterfully portrayed the life of the buildings, houses and the streets of a rapidly built, nineteenth-century Mexico. 

The Curious Design Enigmas of Chichén Itzá's Temple of Kukulkán

09:30 - 16 March, 2018
The Curious Design Enigmas of Chichén Itzá's Temple of Kukulkán, Courtesy of Ezra Schwartz
Courtesy of Ezra Schwartz

This article was originally published by Ezra Schwartz on LinkedIn. It has been reprinted here with permission from the author. 

Spotlight: Luis Barragán

10:30 - 9 March, 2018
Spotlight: Luis Barragán, Casa Gilardi. Imagevia <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Casa_Giraldi_Luis_Barragan.JPG'>Wikimedia user Ulises00</a> (public domain)
Casa Gilardi. Imagevia Wikimedia user Ulises00 (public domain)

One of Mexico's greatest architects, Luis Ramiro Barragán Morfín (March 9, 1902 – November 22, 1988) revolutionized modern architecture in the country with his use of bright colors reminiscent of the traditional architecture of Mexico, and with works such as his Casa Barragán, the Chapel of the Capuchinas, the Torres de Satélite, "Los Clubes" (Cuadra San Cristobal and Fuente de los Amantes), and the Casa Gilardi, among many others.

These 6 Firms Are Spearheading the Post-Digital Drawing Craze in Mexico

14:00 - 4 March, 2018
These 6 Firms Are Spearheading the Post-Digital Drawing Craze in Mexico, Cortesía de PALMA
Cortesía de PALMA

The hyperrealistic representation of architecture is not a new concept due to the ubiquity of tools that offer the possibility of creating perplexing images with photographs. However, those who defend the expressive capacity of hand drawings have found ways to take advantage of the digital tools of the last decades to represent their architectural projects. 

Benjamín Romano: "I Focus on Improving the Building"

09:30 - 23 February, 2018
Benjamín Romano: "I Focus on Improving the Building", Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand

Visiting Mexico City several times in recent months enabled me to get to know a number of leading architects there. In the process, I was in turn directed to other architects that were new to me, whom I then discovered were, in fact, the leading and most revered architects in the country according to the local architectural community. I am particularly referring to Alberto Kalach and Mauricio Rocha, whose interviews were published in this column last year, and Benjamín Romano, whose name came up when I asked a number of architects to cite their favorite building from recent years in Mexico City. Along with the absolute favorite, Vasconcelos Library by Kalach, another structure stood out: Torre Reforma, a 57-story office tower, the tallest building in the city. The following conversation with Romano, its architect, took place inside this unusually powerful and inventive structure.

Teddy Cruz Wins 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture

06:00 - 7 February, 2018
Teddy Cruz Wins 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture, Courtesy of The Vilcek Foundation
Courtesy of The Vilcek Foundation

Each year the Vilcek Foundation selects American immigrant champions of the arts and sciences. This year the 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture was awarded to Guatemala-born, and now San Diego-based, professor and architect Teddy Cruz. Cruz uses his past experiences, living in Guatemala during its civil war, to focus his academic and professional career on shaping political and socioeconomic forces.

Félix Candela’s Concrete Shells Through Photographs, Architectural Models and Plans

14:00 - 4 February, 2018
 Félix Candela’s Concrete Shells Through Photographs, Architectural Models and Plans, Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt
Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt

Spanish and Mexican architect Félix Candela is widely recognized as one of the most prominent figures in 20th century architecture. His innovative experiments with reinforced concrete produced iconic buildings deemed cascarones, or 'shell structures', such as the Pavilion of Cosmic Rays at UNAM, Mexico City (1951); the Chapel Lomas de Cuernavaca, Cuernavaca (1958); Los Manantiales Restaurant, Xochimilco (1958); and the Palace of Sports for the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. 

Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards

12:40 - 1 February, 2018
Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards, Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales
Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales

The Architectural League of New York has announced the recipients of its 2018 Emerging Voices awards, spotlighting individuals and firms “with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism.”

Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”

09:30 - 12 January, 2018
Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”, House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan
House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan

As part of a generation of designers that have, in recent years, put Mexico on the map, Tatiana Bilbao is an architect that is increasingly part of the profession’s global consciousness. But, while some Mexican architects have made their mark with spectacular architecture following the international trend of “iconic” architecture, Bilbao opted instead for a more people-focused approach. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, Bilbao explains how she got into this type of community-building architecture, her thoughts on architectural form, and her ambitions for the future.

Loading... It could take a few seconds