Mexican Architecture

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Taller Capital Wins the 2022 MCHAP Award for Emerging Practice for the Colosio Embankment Dam in Mexico

The Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP) has selected Containing the Flood: Colosio Embankment Dam by Loreta Castro Reguera and José Pablo Ambrosi of Taller Capital as the winners of the 2022 MCHAP.emerge award. Acknowledging the best-built work in the Americas authored by a practice in its first ten years of operation, the 2022 MCHAP Prize for Emerging Practice (MCHAP.emerge) considered built works completed in the Americas between January 2018 to December 2021. Past MCHAP.emerge Laureates include Pezo von Ellrichshausen (2014), PRODUCTORA (2016), and Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (2018).

The Mies Crown Hall Prize Announces Finalists for 2022 MCHAP Award for Emerging Practice

The Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP) has announced four finalist projects designed by emerging practices in the Americas for the 2022 MCHAP.emerge, the fourth cycle of the award.

Mexican Interiors: Bathrooms Integrating Matt Black Fittings and Taps

Over the years, interior design has evolved according to the needs that arise, but above all, according to the experiences it seeks to evoke in the user. In the last two years, we have witnessed a radical change and a particular interest in this subject because the pandemic forced us to pay specific attention to the configuration of the places we inhabit. This brought about much more holistic designs that seek to address the user's wellbeing, combining colors, sensory experiences, technology, and natural elements that promote health.

From Chile to Mexico: 30 Houses on the Coast of the Pacific Ocean

Is there only one way to inhabit the coast? The Pacific coast, the largest ocean on earth, is a vast territory with a great diversity of temperature, winds, and topography, among others. Consequently, it has a great variety of ecosystems, ranging from the freezing point near the poles, vast deserts and forests, to the hot tropical rainforest. Such majestic diversity is no stranger to architecture, responding to the different contexts in which it is placed. As a result, there is a great variety of architectural works, all of which share in framing the views of the sea.

The Mies Crown Hall Prize Announces Shortlist for 2022 MCHAP Award for Emerging Practice

After a two-year suspension due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize has announced that 10 projects designed by emerging practices in the Americas have been shortlisted for the 2022 MCHAP.emerge.

21 Spaces in Mexico That Integrate Hammocks for Rest and Contemplation

One of the most representative non-fixed elements of the tropical zones of Mexico are the hammocks, as they are part of the history and daily life, representing an important piece of furniture in the houses. Although it is true that the hammock is not originally from Mexico, it is thought that it may have arrived in the Yucatan Peninsula and was adopted throughout the southeast of the country in areas whose temperature and humidity require a kind of floating bed. In the case of the Mayan region, hammocks were initially made of Hamack tree bark. Later, both in the Mexican region and in the rest of Central America, the sisal plant, with softer and more elastic fibres, began to be used.

Architecture or Revolution: Frida Kahlo’s Houses and the Functionalist Movement

Geometric shapes, exposed reinforced concrete walls, visible electrical installations, large windows that prioritize natural light and ventilation, gardens that value native plants. The first works by the Mexican architect Juan O’Gorman, built between 1929 and 1932, bring an aesthetic that can be seen today, but in reality they are the pure expression of one of the currents of the 20th century modernist movement, functionalism.

Mexican Interiors: 46 Dining Spaces in Houses and Flats

Over the years, interior design has evolved according to the needs that arise, but above all according to the experiences it seeks to evoke in the user. In the last two years we have witnessed a radical change and a special interest in this subject because the pandemic forced us to pay specific attention to the configuration of the places we inhabit. This has brought about much more holistic designs that seek to address the wellbeing of the user, combining colours, sensory experiences, technology and natural elements that promote health.

Architecture as a Book of Fiction: Craig Dykers on the Snøhetta-Designed Museum of Environmental Sciences in Mexico

In Mexico, until recently, unknown to many, an architectural project has been slowly revealing itself to society. The Environmental Sciences Museum (MCA for its Spanish acronym) of the University of Guadalajara in the state of Jalisco is one of the most ambitious architectural projects in Western Mexico. Not only because of its unusual architecture but also because of how it seeks to communicate the mission of a natural history museum, one that can hardly be called traditional.

Crafting for Contemplation: The Minimal vs. The Ornamental

A few weeks ago, this year’s edition of the Serpentine Pavilion opened to the public. Designed by Chicago-based artist Theaster Gates, it’s an evocative project, its cylindrical form referencing American beehive kilns, English bottle kilns, and Musgum adobe homes found in Cameroon.