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Tate Harmer Reveals Plans for Eco-Hotel at the Eden Project in England

16:20 - 25 April, 2017
Tate Harmer Reveals Plans for Eco-Hotel at the Eden Project in England, © AVR London
© AVR London

Tate Harmer has released plans for a new £8.5million hotel that will provide accommodation for visitors of The Eden Project in Cornwall, England, as the project has received planning approval. The 109-room building will utilize locally-sourced materials and meet high standards of efficiency and sustainability, matching the conservation-minded spirit of the Eden Project.

© AVR London © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer +7

UK's First "Naked House" Proposal Aims to Bring Affordability to London's Housing Market

12:45 - 24 April, 2017
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX

The average cost of a home in London has now reached over £500,000 ($640,000), a figure far beyond the reach of the large majority of individuals or families on or below the average UK income (£34,473, or just under $45,000, per year). It’s a story which has been told time and again in recent years; the “housing crisis” of affordability continues to exacerbate the lives of a generation.

For Naked House, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to “stripping affordable housing back to the bare essentials,” crisis necessitates a creative response. With support and funding from the GLA (Greater London Authority) and the incumbent Mayor of London, who has awarded a £500,000 grant to the development, they—in collaboration with OMMX—have now made an important step closer to realizing their vision.

Site model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Interior space. Image Courtesy of OMMX Sectional model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Perspective based on the urban typology of a "Mews". Image Courtesy of OMMX +5

Neo-Bankside Residents Launch Legal Bid Against Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern Extension

04:00 - 19 April, 2017
Neo-Bankside Residents Launch Legal Bid Against Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern Extension, The proximity of the two projects. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
The proximity of the two projects. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Residents of London's Neo Bankside residential building—a luxury complex of apartments designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners—have launched a legal bid against the Tate Modern to close one side of a public viewing platform, designed by Herzog & de Meuron and completed in 2016, which overlooks their properties. As reported by the Architects' Journal, "the applicants say that their human rights are being breached due to ‘near constant surveillance’ from visitors to the neighbouring attraction." The claim goes as far to argue that visitors to the Southbank gallery "constantly view their flats through binoculars, and post photographs and film of their homes on social media sites."

Shortlist Announced for 2017 RIBA London Awards

11:30 - 14 April, 2017
© Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

A total of 85 buildings from the British capital have been shortlisted for the 2017 RIBA London Awards, including projects from Wilkinson Eyre, AHMM, Allies and Morrison, Herzog & de Meuron, and Rogers Stirk Harbour. All 85  buildings will now be visited and carefully assessed by one of four regional juries, before the regional winners are selected in June of this year. Winning projects will continue on to compete for the RIBA Stirling Prize - the UK's highest honor for architecture.

See a complete list of shortlisted buildings after the break.

Nomadic Bookstore in Milan / AA Museum Lab & Lars Müller Publishers

12:30 - 13 April, 2017
Nomadic Bookstore in Milan / AA Museum Lab & Lars Müller Publishers, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Model. Image Courtesy of AA Museum Lab Pavilion under construction. Image Courtesy of AA Museum Lab Model. Image Courtesy of AA Museum Lab Drawing. Image Courtesy of AA Museum Lab +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Piazza S. Marco, 2, 20121 Milano, Italy
  • Tutors

    Giulia Foscari, Harikleia Karamali (Architectural Association)
  • Client

    Lars Müller
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

    Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of AA Museum Lab

This Interactive Map Shows How London Has Changed Over the Past 100 Years

16:00 - 12 April, 2017
This Interactive Map Shows How London Has Changed Over the Past 100 Years, Houses of Parliament – Then and Now. Image Courtesy of Expedia
Houses of Parliament – Then and Now. Image Courtesy of Expedia

Go on a virtual stroll through century-old London, with this new interactive map produced by Expedia. Named “Historic London,” the app takes you through 14 notable sites throughout the British capital, from Buckingham Palace to a view of St. Paul’s Cathedral from Fleet Street. Archival images of the sites from the late 1800s and early 1900s are overlayed onto the streetview of today, so you can easily compare what has and hasn’t changed over the last 100 years.

Check out the interactive map for yourself below:

Hanging Gardens of Babylon-Inspired Residential Units Proposed for Birmingham

06:00 - 12 April, 2017
Hanging Gardens of Babylon-Inspired Residential Units Proposed for Birmingham, Courtesy of Architects of Invention
Courtesy of Architects of Invention

A new housing complex in the form of 500 terraced units has been proposed by London practice Architects of Invention for the city of Birmingham, in response to its growing multicultural population. Drawing inspiration from the ancient Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Garden Hill’s formal composition is that of two staggered 25-storey towers, with private and communal gardens on each level of terraces.

With the project's swooping mass, the residences aim to offer panoramic views of Birmingham, given its central location in the Digbeth area, a 10-minute walk from the city center. Additionally, the staggered towers capture ample daylighting over the course of the day, with the south end benefitting from the morning sun and the north end in the evening.

Courtesy of Architects of Invention Courtesy of Architects of Invention Courtesy of Architects of Invention Courtesy of Architects of Invention +22

Zaha Hadid Architects Unveils Designs for Sports-Centered Eco Technology Hub in England

12:30 - 6 April, 2017
Zaha Hadid Architects Unveils Designs for Sports-Centered Eco Technology Hub in England, Courtesy of Ecotricity
Courtesy of Ecotricity

British green energy company Ecotricity has revealed plans for a new Zaha Hadid Architects-designed green technology hub in Stroud, England. The project, known as the “Gateway to Stroud,” will consist of several greenhouse-like buildings and a wooden footbridge that will connect the campus to the future all-wood stadium for the Forest Green Rovers football club, also designed by ZHA and revealed late last year.

Planned as a center for local sports and sports science, the ECO park will provide state-of-the-art office space for environmentally-focused companies as well as public access to a wide range of health and leisure activities.

Courtesy of Ecotricity Courtesy of Ecotricity © Zaha Hadid Architects, render by VA © Zaha Hadid Architects, render by VA +9

New Study to Investigate Skyscraper-Induced Depression and Motion Sicknesses

08:00 - 5 April, 2017
New Study to Investigate Skyscraper-Induced Depression and Motion Sicknesses, Courtesy of Flickr User Shashank Jain, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr User Shashank Jain, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Have you been experiencing motion sickness, depression, sleepiness, and even fear, as you gaze out of your window from the 44th floor? If so, you may be prone to “Sick Building Syndrome” – the informal term for side effects caused by swaying skyscrapers, according to experts at the Universities of Bath and Exeter, who are launching a £7 million ($8.6 million) study into their causes and prevention through testing simulations.

“More and more people are living and working in high-rises and office blocks, but the true impact of vibrations on them is currently very poorly understood,” explained Alex Pavic, Professor of Vibration Engineering at the University of Exeter. “It will for the first time link structural motion, environmental conditions, and human body motion, psychology, and physiology in a fully controllable virtual environment.”

RIBA’s New National Architecture Centre Will Celebrate Liverpool’s Architectural History

06:00 - 1 April, 2017
RIBA’s New National Architecture Centre Will Celebrate Liverpool’s Architectural History, © Edmund Sumner
© Edmund Sumner

Liverpool will soon be home to the Royal Institute of British Architect’s (RIBA) new national centre for architecture, RIBA North, which will be a new focal point for visitors to learn about architecture, as well as the culture and history behind Liverpool’s built environment. Occupying a part of the Mann Island Buildings designed by Broadway Malyan in 2013, RIBA North will offer a host of new opportunities for architectural discovery and education, including exhibitions, lectures, tours, and a digital model of the city.

“At RIBA North, we have a building with museum conditions which will offer a magnificent opportunity to view RIBA’s world-renowned historic collections showing hundreds of years of the UK’s extraordinary architectural history,” explained RIBA President Jane Duncan. “We are particularly proud to strengthen our cultural and creative offering in the north of England, and to enable many more people to explore and understand the enormous impact that architecture and design has on all our lives.”

© Edmund Sumner © McCoy Wynne © Web Aviation UK © Web Aviation UK +5

Understanding British Postmodernism (Hint: It’s Not What You Thought)

04:00 - 29 March, 2017
Understanding British Postmodernism (Hint: It’s Not What You Thought), Staff Accommodation block at St Paul’s Girl’s School, by John Melvin (1985), photographed by Martin Charles. Image © John Melvin
Staff Accommodation block at St Paul’s Girl’s School, by John Melvin (1985), photographed by Martin Charles. Image © John Melvin

In this essay by the British architect and academic Dr. Timothy Brittain-Catlin, the very notion of British postmodernism—today often referred to as intimately tied to the work of James Stirling and the the thinking of Charles Jencks—is held to the light. Its true origins, he argues, are more historically rooted.

I grew up in a beautiful late Victorian terrace with ornamental brickwork, shaped ‘Dutch’ gables and pretty arts and crafts stained glass windows – and so I didn’t think then, and I don’t think now, that I had much to learn from Las Vegas. It turns out that I wasn’t the only one. Of British architects who made their names as postmodernists in the 1980s, not a single one would say now that they owed much to Robert Venturi, the American architect widely considered to be a grandfather of movement.

Mercers’ House, Essex Road, Highbury, London, by John Melvin (1992), photographed by Martin Charles. Doctors’ Surgery frontage to Mitchison Road. Image © John Melvin Mercers’ House, Essex Road, Highbury, London, by John Melvin (1992), photographed by Martin Charles. Image © John Melvin Epping Forest Civic Offices, by Richard Reid (1984-90). Axonometric by Richard Reid. Image © Richard Reid & Associates Mercers’ House, Essex Road, Highbury, London, by John Melvin (1992), photographed by Martin Charles. Image © John Melvin +6

Rising Practice Feilden Fowles Beats Out Stirling Prize Winners in University of Cambridge Competition

12:00 - 21 March, 2017
Rising Practice Feilden Fowles Beats Out Stirling Prize Winners in University of Cambridge Competition, © Feilden Fowles
© Feilden Fowles

Homerton College, Cambridge and competition-organizers Malcolm Reading Consultants have announced that emerging practice Feilden Fowles has been selected as the winners of the competition to design a new £7 million showpiece dining hall for Homerton College, the newest constituent college of the University of Cambridge. Unanimously selected by the competition jury, Feilden Fowles’ scheme was chosen over a shortlist of entries from 2016 Stirling Prize winner Caruso St JohndRMMHall McKnight and Walters & Cohen Architects.

“Feilden Fowles’ concept design for the dining hall subtly relates to the existing ensemble of buildings and the garden setting, and yet has the poise to convince as a showpiece,”  said Professor Geoffrey Ward, Principal of Homerton College, Cambridge.

 “What appealed so strongly about the team’s particular approach was their openness to creating many opportunities for dialogue. We are looking forward to working with them as they develop the detailed design.”

© Feilden Fowles © Feilden Fowles © Feilden Fowles © Feilden Fowles +5

Carmody Groarke’s Cliff-Top Seaside Hotel Secures Planning Approval

14:15 - 20 March, 2017
Carmody Groarke’s Cliff-Top Seaside Hotel Secures Planning Approval , Model of the proposed new building from above. Image © Carmody Groarke
Model of the proposed new building from above. Image © Carmody Groarke

Carmody Groarke’s competition winning design for a new hotel retreat on Burgh Island off the coast of Devon, UK, has received planning approval, clearing the way for the dramatic structure to begin construction. The cliff-top “Pool House” will join the Grade-II listed art deco Burgh Island Hotel in providing accommodation to adventurous visitors, offering panoramic views of the of the Bantham Estuary and the hotel’s Mermaid Pool, an outdoor seawater pool and private beach for hotel guests.

Model of the proposed new building, viewed from the mermaid pool. Image © Carmody Groarke Model of the proposed new building. Image © Carmody Groarke View of the proposed hotel suite from above, looking over the mermaid pool. Image © Carmody Groarke View of the Burgh Island Hotel from the mainland. Image © Carmody Groarke +6

Ideas Competition: What Would a 24-Hour City of the Future Look Like?

19:30 - 14 March, 2017
Ideas Competition: What Would a 24-Hour City of the Future Look Like?, Night Time is the Right Time
Night Time is the Right Time

The Built Environment Trust along with the Greater London Authority are seeking ideas that could help the nightlife of cities work better – be culturally, socially, economically beneficial.

Architects, landscape architects, planners, environmentalists, material scientists, economists, product designers, acoustic experts and other interested parties are invited to submit ideas for better 24 hour cities. The brief is broad: we want big visions and detailed specific thoughts… all can be contenders for the exhibition, publication and prizes on offer.

Alison Brooks Architects Designs First London Highrise for Greenwich Peninsula Development

12:00 - 14 March, 2017
Alison Brooks Architects Designs First London Highrise for Greenwich Peninsula Development, © Alison Brooks Architects
© Alison Brooks Architects

Alison Brooks Architects has revealed designs for their first London highrise as the project receives planning permission. The mixed-use scheme will consist of a cluster of 4 residential towers of varying heights, with co-work and leisure at the ground floor and podium levels, contributing community value to the regeneration of London’s Greenwich Peninsula, the site of Roger Stirk Harbour + Partners’ O2 Arena and a future £1 Billion Mixed-Use Project by Santiago Calatrava.

© Alison Brooks Architects © Alison Brooks Architects © Alison Brooks Architects © Alison Brooks Architects +7

Foster + Partners Wins Ipswich River Crossings Competition

12:00 - 13 March, 2017
Foster + Partners Wins Ipswich River Crossings Competition, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Competitions has announced that Foster + Partners has been selected as the winners of the Ipswich River Crossings competition, beating out proposals from a shortlist including Adamson Associates, Knight Architects, Marc Mimram and Wilkinson Eyre. The competition sought designs for three bridges crossing the Upper Orwell River that could reinvigorate and increase connectivity within Ipswich’s waterfront district.

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners +6

Santiago Calatrava on Ground Zero, Design Philosophy and the Greenwich Peninsula Project

04:00 - 3 March, 2017

Earlier this month, Hong Kong-owned developer Knight Dragon revealed plans for an billion-dollar urban-development scheme that will completely transform London’s Greenwich Peninsula. In this edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, the team speak to Santiago Calatrava—who will be designing the core of this grand new project—about this and his public-spirited design philosophy. Why, they ask, has he’s always wanted to leave a mark on the "Big Smoke?"

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Wins Competition for University of Warwick Arts Hub

12:00 - 21 February, 2017
Courtesy of RIBA Competitions
Courtesy of RIBA Competitions

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios has been selected as the winners of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) competition to design the new Faculty of Arts Building at the University of Warwick, in Coventry, England. Lauded for its flexibility and collaboration-fostering design, the winning proposal was selected over finalist entries from Foster + Partners, Grimshaw, White Arkitekter and Wilkinson Eyre.