ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

h

Nominate now the Building of the Year 2017 »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Grandstand Stadium / ROSSETTI

11:00 - 4 January, 2017
Grandstand Stadium / ROSSETTI, © Rafael Gamo
© Rafael Gamo

© Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo +38

  • Architects

  • Location

    Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11375, United States
  • Area

    125000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Video: Daniel Libeskind on the "Jungle" of New York City

16:00 - 21 December, 2016

“If you took the whole world and collapsed it into one little ball, you’d find it here, in this city.”

In this video from the Louisiana Channel, Daniel Libeskind talks about the chaotic beauty of and his love for New York City. Born in Poland, at the age of 13 Libeskind immigrated to New York, where he witnessed both the building and the collapse of the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers. Intimate with the site, Libeskind was later tasked with designing the masterplan for the World Trade Center's reconstruction.

Check out the video to hear the architect discuss the tolerance, complexities and fascination of his adopted home.

Plans Revealed to Transform Pier 26 into New Park along the Hudson River in New York

12:15 - 19 December, 2016
Plans Revealed to Transform Pier 26 into New Park along the Hudson River in New York, Rendering by OLIN Studio, via Tribeca Citizen. ImagePier 26
Rendering by OLIN Studio, via Tribeca Citizen. ImagePier 26

The Hudson River Park Trust has revealed plans to transform the 800-foot-long Pier 26, located on the Hudson River in the New York neighborhood of TriBeCa. Currently vacant, the pier is set to receive a new park designed by landscape architects OLIN Studio and a maritime education center designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects.

10 Things You Didn't Know About Modern Icon Pierre Chareau

06:00 - 16 December, 2016
10 Things You Didn't Know About Modern Icon Pierre Chareau, Pierre Chareau, Maison de Verre interior, 1928–32, Paris. Image © Mark Lyon. From the 2016 Organizational Grant to The Jewish Museum for "Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design."
Pierre Chareau, Maison de Verre interior, 1928–32, Paris. Image © Mark Lyon. From the 2016 Organizational Grant to The Jewish Museum for "Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design."

Known for his collaboration on the legendary Maison de Verre, French architect, and interior designer Pierre Chareau is a celebrated artist cited by Richard Rogers, Jean Nouvel, and more as a major influence on their work.

Completed in 1932, Maison de Verre—or “House of Glass”—has become a prime example of modern architecture, despite the fact that not many people have actually seen the hidden treasure, located on Paris’ Left Bank.

Although his work is currently viewed in high regard, Chareau had a tumultuous career, with large variances between his successes and his failures.

Drawing from a Cultured Magazine spotlight article on the designer, we have compiled a list of facts about Chareau’s life and career that showcase the rollercoaster of his success.

Continue reading for the 10 things you didn’t know about Pierre Chareau.

Davis Brody Bond and Kieran Timberlake Unveil Designs for NYU Complex in New York

06:00 - 14 December, 2016

The architectural team comprised of Davis Brody Bond and Kieran Timberlake has unveiled its newest updates on the design for 181 Mercer, a 735,000-square-foot complex for New York University that will replace a 35-year-old gym facility and become NYU’s largest classroom building, as well as a space for performing arts, athletics, and students and faculty housing. 

AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux

04:00 - 11 December, 2016
AD Classics: Trylon and Perisphere / Harrison and Fouilhoux, Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr user Richard under CC BY 2.0

With the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s, the great World’s Fairs that had been held around the globe since the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 lost much of their momentum. With the specter of another global conflict looming like a stormcloud on the horizon in the latter half of the decade, prospects for the future only grew darker. It was in this air of uncertainty and fear that the gleaming white Trylon and Perisphere of the 1939 New York World’s Fair made their debuts, the centerpiece of an exhibition that presented a vision of hope for things to come.

Image via MetMuseum.org (Public Domain) A quarter section of the Perisphere reveals its steel skeletal structure. ImageImage via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) Image via nyworldsfaircollections.tumblr.com (Public Domain) The Helicline connected the Trylon and Perisphere and allowed visitors to make their way back to the ground from six stories up +8

Foster + Partners' Plans for 50 Hudson Yards in New York Unveiled

14:00 - 8 December, 2016
Foster + Partners' Plans for 50 Hudson Yards in New York Unveiled, Courtesy of Related-Oxford
Courtesy of Related-Oxford

Foster + Partners’ designs for the latest tower to be located within New York’s Hudson Yards megaproject have been revealed. Named 50 Hudson Yards, the building will rise 985 feet (300 meters) into the sky in becoming New York City’s fourth largest commercial office tower with 2.9 million gross square feet and the new home of leading investment firm BlackRock.

50 Hudson Yards with 30 Hudson Yards and the No. 7 Subway. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford 50 Hudson Yards and 10th Avenue. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford Courtesy of Related-Oxford Hudson Yards Masterplan. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford +8

Re-Constructivist Architecture

05:00 - 6 December, 2016
Re-Constructivist Architecture, Casa Cecchini a S. Maria di Galeria, Roma, 1971 - A. Anselmi (with C. Giannini) - edited by Warehouse of Architecture and Research with Valentino Danilo Matteis
Casa Cecchini a S. Maria di Galeria, Roma, 1971 - A. Anselmi (with C. Giannini) - edited by Warehouse of Architecture and Research with Valentino Danilo Matteis

Ierimonti Gallery New York is pleased to present Re-Constructivist Architecture, curated by Jacopo Costanzo and Giovanni Cozzani with Giulia Leone and promoted by the Scientific Technical Committee of Casa dell'Architettura in collaboration with Consulta Giovani Roma. The exhibition will feature the work of thirteen international emerging architecture firms, aiming to portray a generation of architects born in the ‘80s: a countertrend that tries to recover a debate lost years ago and obstructed by a cumbersome star system.

XOCO 325 / DDG

15:00 - 5 December, 2016
XOCO 325 / DDG, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Robert Granoff © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Robert Granoff +17

The Economic and Social Power of Walkable Cities

08:00 - 5 December, 2016
The Economic and Social Power of Walkable Cities, New York, USA. Image © Flickr User: Jeffrey Zeldman. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
New York, USA. Image © Flickr User: Jeffrey Zeldman. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Over the last few years, the way Americans move around has changed remarkably, especially among young people. Previously the automobile was people’s preferred, if not the only, option. Now they are choosing to walk, bike, or use public transport according to recent studies.

This difference in preferred transportation methods has generated many benefits not only for residents but also for cities, in both economic and social terms. 

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

04:00 - 5 December, 2016
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction +6

Calatrava's St. Nicholas National Shrine at the World Trade Center Tops Out

13:20 - 29 November, 2016
Calatrava's St. Nicholas National Shrine at the World Trade Center Tops Out, via Saint Nicholas National Shrine at the World Trade Center
via Saint Nicholas National Shrine at the World Trade Center

The Santiago Calatrava-designed St. Nicholas National Shrine at the World Trade Center has topped out, and capped with a temporary, six-foot-tall cross.

The Byzantine-styled structure was envisioned by Calatrava in 2013 as a non-denominational spiritual center to replace the original St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, located at 155 Cedar Street, which was destroyed on 9/11.

"Never Built New York" Explores the Forgotten Past and the Future that Never Was

09:30 - 29 November, 2016
Raymond Hood Skyscraper Bridge. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books
Raymond Hood Skyscraper Bridge. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "An Incredible Journey into the New York City that Never Was."

Imagine the waters surrounding the Statue of Liberty were filled up with land. That you could walk right up to Lady Liberty herself, following a path from Manhattan’s Battery Park. Believe it or not, in 1911, this could have been.

In Never Built New York, authors Greg Goldin and Sam Lubell (foreword by Daniel Libeskind) describe with irony, and sometimes nostalgia, the most significant architectural and planning projects of the last century, projects that would have drastically changed the city—but never did.

12 Projects Recognized as 2016 NYC Public Design Commission Award Winners

16:00 - 28 November, 2016

Mayor Bill de Blasio and the New York City Public Design Commission have announced the winners of their 2016 Awards for Excellence in Design. Established in 1983, the award has been bestowed annually to projects from the city’s five boroughs that “exemplify how innovative and thoughtful design can provide New Yorkers with the best possible public spaces and services and engender a sense of civic pride.” Both built and unbuilt projects are considered for the award. Previous winners have included Studio Gang’s Fire Rescue 2 (2015), the Louis Kahn-designed Four Freedoms Park (2014), and Steven Holl’s Hunters Point Library (2011).

40th Police Precinct / BIG + Starr Whitehouse. Image Courtesy of BIG Waterfront Nature Walk / George Trakas + Quennell Rothschild & Partners. Image Courtesy of George Trakas and Quennell Rothschild & Partners The High Line Park Passage and Spur / James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Piet Oudolf. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf Snug Harbor Cultural Center Music Hall Addition / Studio Joseph + SCAPE/Landscape Architecture. Image Courtesy of Studio Joseph and SCAPE +39

See How New York’s Pilot Scheme of Modular Microhouses Was Built

09:30 - 26 November, 2016

[In New York] there’s this math problem: 1.8 million small households and only one million suitable apartments. – Mimi Hoang, principal of nArchitects

Last year, nArchitects released a trailer that teased the development of their winning adAPT NYC entry, Carmel Place (formerly known as My Micro NY). The competition sought to address the need for small household apartments in New York City. Now in a newly released video, the full story of the city’s tallest modular tower comes together in smooth timelapse to a dainty piano soundtrack.

© Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez +26

Enclave at the Cathedral / Handel Architects

11:00 - 25 November, 2016
Enclave at the Cathedral / Handel Architects, © David Paler
© David Paler

© David Paler © David Paler © David Paler © David Paler +15

  • Architects

  • Location

    400 W 113th St, New York, NY 10025, United States
  • Area

    403000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Monument to Privacy: Is This Manhattan Skyscraper a NSA Listening Post?

04:00 - 23 November, 2016

Many have walked by and wondered what purpose this vast, windowless skyscraper in the heart of Manhattan serves. 33 Thomas Street, also known as the "Long Lines Building" (LLB), is an impenetrable monolithic fortress amid canyons of glass and steel. Ostensibly an AT&T telecoms building, the New York Times have recently reported (based on investigative work by The Intercept) that this "blank face[d] monument to privacy" may in fact be a NSA (National Security Agency) listening post, hidden in plain sight.

Gentrification's Image Problem and How It Has Been Villified

08:00 - 21 November, 2016
Gentrification's Image Problem and How It Has Been Villified, Revitalização da High Line, linha férrea desativada de Nova York, elevou os preços dos imóveis da região. Image © Steven Severinghaus, via Flickr. CC
Revitalização da High Line, linha férrea desativada de Nova York, elevou os preços dos imóveis da região. Image © Steven Severinghaus, via Flickr. CC

The idea of revitalizing a public space by bringing improvement that brings people together should not generate suspicion or fear. However, specific examples of places that have seen the cost of living greatly increase after their revitalization have been creating paradoxes. After all, does this "new villain" called gentrification have any relation to placemaking?

The answer, unfortunately, is yes. Although it's not a direct relation of cause and effect, it is impossible to deny the tenuous line between the two concepts. By definition, gentrification, or "ennoblement," refers to the social, cultural, and economic improvement of a neighborhood or, on a larger scale, of an entire region. Placemaking is the process of planning quality public spaces that contribute to the well-being of the local community. The concepts may be similar, but the methods and consequences of the two are very different.