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Wood: The Latest Architecture and News

“Wood Can Connect the Simple and the Sublime:” In Conversation With Helen & Hard Architects

In a conversation with Louisiana Channel, the founders of the international practice Helen & Hard Architects reaffirm their insistence on community and sustainability. The use of wood, in their practice, has become more than a building philosophy, it has turned into a philosophy. “Trees have a life of their own, and you feel a deep respect for the time it has taken to grow. We work with something alive, an organic material. We can’t do as we please with it. We must interact with the material.”

In August 2022, Siv Helene Stangeland and Reinhard Kropf, the founders of Helen & Hard, were interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at various locations in and around Stavanger, Norway. The area holds special importance for the architects, whose approach was influenced by the culture that permeates Stavanger and the west coast of Norway.

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The Versatility of Wooden Structures in Contemporary Brazilian Projects

From ancestral constructions to the "concrete of the future", terms abound to describe timber. Present in the history and horizon of world architecture, the material demonstrates a sustainable possibility and is associated with the coziness and warmth that it provides in the spatial atmosphere. In Brazil, it is no different. Several contemporary works explore the qualities and benefits of its use, including structural bias.

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70°N arkitektur, Together with Snøhetta and Artist Joar Nango, Designs a National Theater for the Indigenous Sámi People in Norway

The Sámi National Theater Beaivváš and Sámi High School and Reindeer Husbandry School are two of the most important cultural institutions of Sápmi, a region in northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland traditionally inhabited by the Sámi people. To strengthen the position of the two institutions, a project was initiated in June 2021 to create a shared cultural and educational facility. A design proposal by 70°N arkitektur, in collaboration with Snøhetta and artist and architect Joar Nango, was chosen following a competition. The building, also known as Čoarvemátta, is currently under construction and is expected to be completed by 2024.

“Changing Our Footprint”: Henning Larsen Opens an Explorative Exhibition at Aedes Architecture Forum in Berlin

In an effort to address the architecture industry’s environmental impact, Henning Larsen is presenting the “Changing Our Footprint” exhibition at Aedes Architecture Forum in Berlin. The event features the small but scalable steps that the office is taking to move towards a more desirable future through the projects they are designing and the research they are conducting. The exhibition aims to be an engaging event, inviting visitors to participate in the dialogue, to think critically about the proposed solutions and initiatives, and to ask difficult questions in the search for better outcomes. The exhibition is open until March 22, 2023. Henning Larsen will also host a series of panel debates at the Aedes Architecture Forum from February 22 to March 14.

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The Challenges of Designing a Reusable, Floating Wooden Building

Everyone who has ever built anything—a model, a birdhouse, or small pieces of furniture—has a clear sense of the amount of things that can go wrong during the construction process. A screw that is impossible to tighten fully, a warped wooden board, an inattention or a miscalculation that can frustrate plans instantly. When we transport these small inconveniences to a building scale, with countless processes and many different people involved, we know how complex a work can become and how many things can get out of control, taking more and more time and requiring more and more resources to finish. And when we talk about a building that needs to float, be completely self-sufficient, and, after fulfilling its useful life, be completely reused—could you imagine the technical challenges of building something like this?

Educational Theater of the Arts of Panguipulli in Chile, Wins the Esenciales X Archdaily 2022 Award

Designed by architects Tomás Villalón, Nicolás Norero, and Leonardo Quinteros, the Educational Theater of the Arts of Panguipulli has been chosen in Chile as the winning work in the architecture category of ESENCIALES x ArchDaily 2022.

Adega Casa da Torre / Carlos Castanheira

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Louro, Portugal

What Is Half-Timbered Architecture?

Contrary to what some people mistakenly say, half-timber is not a style, but a building technique. Brought to Brazil by German immigrants, it was used mainly in regions of Espírito Santo, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul. The technique has now become a strong attraction for tourists. But after all, what defines it?

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Call for Submissions: 2022-23 Wood Design & Building Awards

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The Call for Entries is now open to North American and International submissions to the 2022-23 Wood Design and Building Awards program recognizing excellence in wood architecture.

The Wood Design & Building Awards program recognizes design teams that are passionate about celebrating wood as a safe, strong and sophisticated building material.

Mass Is More: An Installation Brings the Innovation of Industrialized Wood Construction to the Barcelona Pavilion

On the 4th of October, the temporary installation "Mass is More", a project designed by Daniel Ibáñez and Vicente Guallart, from the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC), together with Alan Organschi from Bauhaus Earth (BE), was presented at the Barcelona Pavilion. It was open to the general public from the 1st to the 9th of October.

Spaces of Transition that Improve Quality of Life in Interiors

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Although things seem to have returned to normal, it is undeniable that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed everyone. The truth is, its impacts on the economy and society can still be felt and will remain for some time. As a consequence, most people have become more conscious about public health, disease dissemination and the importance of science in everyday life. Many began to place more importance on time spent with family and at home, while companies have realized that not all office spaces are really essential and that home office can be just as effective.

The result is that people have began modifying their spaces to accommodate new uses which might have been unthinkable before. Our homes had to become, in a few weeks, places for rest, work, study, sports and leisure. Most were not prepared for this change, but gradually both residents and architects and designers found ways to adapt to the new reality. We've learned that accommodating new functions into a home means more than just setting up a table in the only free corner of the apartment. The pandemic also accelerated certain global trends and changed our relationships with products, companies and services, in terms of sustainability, social justice, digitization and individualization. The common factor between these different elements is that now they no longer require you to make a choice between one thing or another. Instead, all these elements are now connected, making life, people and products more agile and long-lasting. Under the motto “Create Transitions”, EGGER shows how decors and wood-based products can create and shape change in everyday living.

Henning Larsen Designs Church with Wooden Roof Domes in Copenhagen

Henning Larsen has revealed the first images of the Ørestad Church, the first church to be built in Copenhagen in the last 30 years. The modern monument is built in wood and wood shingle, reflecting Ørestad’s open natural landscape and embracing the identity of the local community. The intention was to create a serene space, detached from the bustle of the city, where the calmness and simplicity of interior spaces can offer residents solace from their everyday life. Construction is expected to start in 2024, and the church will be consecrated in 2026.

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What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From?

In the architectural conversations we are having in today’s world, conversations on materials are widespread. There is discussion on the viability of concrete in the contemporary context, how timber can be more sustainably sourced, and on how biodegradable materials such as bamboo should be more common sights in our urban environments.

But we also need to be talking about what goes into these buildings – that is, the furniture that decorates, enhances, and makes habitable the buildings around us. The materials used to craft these objects have constantly evolved over centuries, and as we approach the end of 2022, it’s worth asking – what does the future hold for what our furniture will be made from?

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Refinement and Warmth: Incorporating Wood into a School’s Façade

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Wooden elements have the power to add warmth to a space or building. Through their shades, textures and rustic look, wooden surfaces tend to stand out, especially when used alongside more neutral and sober materials. In the Aldapeta María Ikastetxea School, a project developed by IDOM in the city of San Sebastian, Spain, the architects used the material in a particularly interesting way. Wood panels brought visual comfort and warmth to the building, whose material palette is limited, focusing especially on the use of glass, steel and exposed concrete.

Guide to Ceilings: Materials and Uses in Architectural Projects

Depending on the aesthetics of a space, the economy of the materials or even their long-term maintenance, there are various types of ceilings that are capable of meeting the technical and functional needs of architectural projects. Regardless of their manufacturing method, whether industrialised or handcrafted, ceilings represent a constructive element that constitutes the finish or interior cladding of roofs.